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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9645
Polybius, Histories, 36.12


nan1.  It should cause no surprise if at times I use my proper name in speaking of myself, and elsewhere use general expressions such as "after I had said this" or again, "and when I agreed to this.",2.  For as I was personally much involved in the events I am now about to chronicle, I am compelled to change the phrases when alluding to myself, so that I may neither offend by the frequent repetition of my name, nor again by constantly saying "when I" or "for me" fall unintentionally into an ill-mannered habit of speech.,3.  What I wish is by using these modes of expression alternately and in their proper place to avoid as far as possible the offence that lies in speaking constantly about oneself, as such personal references are naturally unwelcome, but are often necessary when the matter cannot be stated clearly without them.,5.  Luckily I have been assisted in this matter by the fortuitous fact that no one as far as I know, up to the time in which I live at least, has received from his parents the same proper name as my own.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.4.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.4.4.  For since the city of our origin was Agyrium in Sicily, and by reason of our contact with the Romans in that island we had gained a wide acquaintance with their language, we have acquired an accurate knowledge of all the events connected with this empire from the records which have been carefully preserved among them over a long period of time.
2. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.1.1, 1.2.1, 1.3.3, 1.5.1, 1.8.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1.1.  Although it is much against my will to indulge in the explanatory statements usually given in the prefaces to histories, yet I am obliged to prefix to this work some remarks concerning myself. In doing this it is neither my intention to dwell too long on my own praise, which I know would be distasteful to the reader, nor have I the purpose of censuring other historians, as Anaximenes and Theopompus did in the prefaces to their histories, but I shall only show the reasons that induced me to undertake this work and give an accounting of the sources from which I gained the knowledge of the things that I am going to relate. 1.2.1.  That I have indeed made choice of a subject noble, lofty and useful to many will not, I think, require any lengthy argument, at least for those who are not utterly unacquainted with universal history. For if anyone turns his attention to the successive supremacies both of cities and of nations, as accounts of them have been handed down from times past, and then, surveying them severally and comparing them together, wishes to determine which of them obtained the widest dominion and both in peace and war performed the most brilliant achievements, he will find that the supremacy of the Romans has far surpassed all those that are recorded from earlier times, not only in the extent of its dominion and in the splendor of its achievements — which no account has as yet worthily celebrated — but also in the length of time during which it has endured down to our day. 1.3.3.  But Rome rules every country that is not inaccessible or uninhabited, and she is mistress of every sea, not only of that which lies inside the Pillars of Hercules but also of the Ocean, except that part of it which is not navigable; she is the first and the only State recorded in all time that ever made the risings and the settings of the sun the boundaries of her dominion. Nor has her supremacy been of short duration, but more lasting than that of any other commonwealth or kingdom. 1.5.1.  In order, therefore, to remove these erroneous impressions, as I have called them, from the minds of many and to substitute true ones in their room, I shall in this Book show who the founders of the city were, at what periods the various groups came together and through what turns of fortune they left their native countries. 1.8.4.  Such things, therefore, will be the subjects of my history and such will be its form. I, the author, am dionysius of halycarnassus, the son of Alexander. And at this point I begin.
3. Strabo, Geography, 1.1.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1.1. IF the scientific investigation of any subject be the proper avocation of the philosopher, Geography, the science of which we propose to treat, is certainly entitled to a high place; and this is evident from many considerations. They who first ventured to handle the matter were distinguished men. Homer, Anaximander the Milesian, and Hecataeus, (his fellow-citizen according to Eratosthenes,) Democritus, Eudoxus, Dicaearchus, Ephorus, with many others, and after these Erastosthenes, Polybius, and Posidonius, all of them philosophers. Nor is the great learning, through which alone this subject can be approached, possessed by any but a person acquainted with both human and divine things, and these attainments constitute what is called philosophy. In addition to its vast importance in regard to social life, and the art of government, Geography unfolds to us the celestial phenomena, acquaints us with the occupants of the land and ocean, and the vegetation, fruits, and peculiarities of the various quarters of the earth, a knowledge of which marks him who cultivates it as a man earnest in the great problem of life and happiness.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ambition/ambitious Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
audience,plutarchs interaction with his Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
chaeronea Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
characterisation,plutarchs self- Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
cicero Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
criticism,plutarchs stance towards others Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
criticism,readers exercise of Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
criticism Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
demosthenes (orator) Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
diodorus siculus Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238
dionysius of halicarnassus Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238
envy Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
examples (i.e. paradigm),oikeia Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
examples (i.e. paradigm),plutarch himself as Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
examples (i.e. paradigm),the subjects as Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
examples (i.e. paradigm) Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
herodotus Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238
local and global perspectives Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238
lycurgus Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
past,connected with present Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
polybius Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238
prologue (to plutarchs book) Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
rhetoric(al),contrasted with action Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
self-praise' Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 44
sicily Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238
strabo,geography Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 238