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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9645
Polybius, Histories, 31.9


nan In Syria King Antiochus, wishing to provide himself with money, decided to make an expedition against the sanctuary of Artemis in Elymaïs. <, On reaching the spot he was foiled in his hopes, as the barbarian tribes who dwelt in the neighbourhood would not permit the outrage, <, and on his retreat he died at Tabae in Persia, smitten with madness, as some people say, <, owing to certain manifestations of divine displeasure when he was attempting this outrage on the above sanctuary. IV. Affairs of Italy The Rival Ptolemies <


nan1.  In Syria King Antiochus, wishing to provide himself with money, decided to make an expedition against the sanctuary of Artemis in Elymaïs.,2.  On reaching the spot he was foiled in his hopes, as the barbarian tribes who dwelt in the neighbourhood would not permit the outrage,,3.  and on his retreat he died at Tabae in Persia, smitten with madness, as some people say,,4.  owing to certain manifestations of divine displeasure when he was attempting this outrage on the above sanctuary. IV. Affairs of Italy The Rival Ptolemie


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 6.1-6.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6.1. King Antiochus was going through the upper provinces when he heard that Elymais in Persia was a city famed for its wealth in silver and gold. 6.2. Its temple was very rich, containing golden shields, breastplates, and weapons left there by Alexander, the son of Philip, the Macedonian king who first reigned over the Greeks. 6.3. So he came and tried to take the city and plunder it, but he could not, because his plan became known to the men of the city 6.4. and they withstood him in battle. So he fled and in great grief departed from there to return to Babylon. 6.5. Then some one came to him in Persia and reported that the armies which had gone into the land of Judah had been routed; 6.6. that Lysias had gone first with a strong force, but had turned and fled before the Jews; that the Jews had grown strong from the arms, supplies, and abundant spoils which they had taken from the armies they had cut down; 6.7. that they had torn down the abomination which he had erected upon the altar in Jerusalem; and that they had surrounded the sanctuary with high walls as before, and also Beth-zur, his city. 6.8. When the king heard this news, he was astounded and badly shaken. He took to his bed and became sick from grief, because things had not turned out for him as he had planned. 6.9. He lay there for many days, because deep grief continually gripped him, and he concluded that he was dying. 6.10. So he called all his friends and said to them, "Sleep departs from my eyes and I am downhearted with worry. 6.11. I said to myself, `To what distress I have come! And into what a great flood I now am plunged! For I was kind and beloved in my power. 6.12. But now I remember the evils I did in Jerusalem. I seized all her vessels of silver and gold; and I sent to destroy the inhabitants of Judah without good reason. 6.13. I know that it is because of this that these evils have come upon me; and behold, I am perishing of deep grief in a strange land. 6.14. Then he called for Philip, one of his friends, and made him ruler over all his kingdom. 6.15. He gave him the crown and his robe and the signet, that he might guide Antiochus his son and bring him up to be king. 6.16. Thus Antiochus the king died there in the one hundred and forty-ninth year.
2. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 1.13, 1.14, 1.16, 2.19, 2.20, 2.21, 2.22, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26, 2.27, 2.28, 2.29, 2.30, 2.31, 2.32, 4.16, 4.17, 5.17, 5.18, 5.19, 5.20, 6.12, 6.13, 6.14, 6.15, 6.16, 6.17, 6.18-7.42, 8, 9, 9.7, 9.8, 9.10, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 11, 14, 15 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.13. For when the leader reached Persia with a force that seemed irresistible, they were cut to pieces in the temple of Nanea by a deception employed by the priests of Nanea.'
3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 13.354-13.356 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13.354. But Aias’s counsel was contrary to theirs, who said that “she would do an unjust action if she deprived a man that was her ally of that authority which belonged to him, and this a man who is related to us; for,” said he, “I would not have thee ignorant of this, that what injustice thou dost to him will make all us that are Jews to be thy enemies.” 13.355. This desire of Aias Cleopatra complied with, and did no injury to Alexander, but made a league of mutual assistance with him at Scythopolis, a city of Celesyria. 13.356. 3. So when Alexander was delivered from the fear he was in of Ptolemy, he presently made an expedition against Celesyria. He also took Gadara, after a siege of ten months. He took also Amathus, a very strong fortress belonging to the inhabitants above Jordan, where Theodorus, the son of Zeno, had his chief treasure, and what he esteemed most precious. This Zeno fell unexpectedly upon the Jews, and slew ten thousand of them, and seized upon Alexander’s baggage.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander the great Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 353
antiochus iv epiphanes Lidonnici and Lieber, Heavenly Tablets: Interpretation, Identity and Tradition in Ancient Judaism (2007) 257
artemis, temple of Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 148
daphne Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 148
epitomator, see also author Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 25
jerusalem Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 353
martyrologies, as secondary source Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 25
motifs (thematic), games with epiphanes Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 25
motifs (thematic), tit for tat Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 25
numbers, accuracy of Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 148
samuel the little Lidonnici and Lieber, Heavenly Tablets: Interpretation, Identity and Tradition in Ancient Judaism (2007) 257
schadenfreude' Lidonnici and Lieber, Heavenly Tablets: Interpretation, Identity and Tradition in Ancient Judaism (2007) 257
sources of 2 maccabees Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 25