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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9645
Polybius, Histories, 3.37.9


ἀπὸ δὲ τοῦ Νάρβωνος καὶ τὰ περὶ τοῦτον Κελτοὶ νέμονται μέχρι τῶν προσαγορευομένων Πυρηναίων ὀρῶν, ἃ διατείνει κατὰ τὸ συνεχὲς ἀπὸ τῆς καθʼ ἡμᾶς θαλάττης ἕως εἰς τὴν ἐκτός. The Celts inhabit the country near the Narbo and beyond it as far as the chain of the Pyrenees which stretches in an unbroken line from the Mediterranean to the Outer Sea. <


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Polybius, Histories, 3.35.7-3.35.8, 3.36.1-3.36.5, 3.37.6-3.37.7, 3.37.10-3.37.11, 3.38.2, 3.39.8, 3.58.2, 3.59.3-3.59.4, 10.7.3, 34.9.13, 39.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.35.7.  With the rest of his force, thus lightened of its impedimenta and consisting now of fifty thousand foot and about nine thousand horse, he advanced throughout the Pyrenees towards the crossing of the Rhone 3.35.8.  having now an army not so strong in number as serviceable and highly trained owing to the unbroken series of wars in Spain. 3.36.1.  That my narrative may not be altogether obscure to readers owing to their ignorance of the topography I must explain whence Hannibal started, what countries he traversed, and into what part of Italy he descended. 3.36.2.  Nor must I simply give the names of countries, rivers, and cities, as some authors do under the idea that this is amply sufficient for a clear knowledge. 3.36.3.  I am of opinion that as regards known countries the mention of names is of no small assistance in recalling them to our memory, but in the case of unknown lands such citation of names is just of as much value as if they were unintelligible and inarticulate sounds. 3.36.4.  For the mind here has nothing to lean upon for support and cannot connect the words with anything known to it, so that the narrative is associated with nothing in the readers' mind, and therefore meaningless to him. 3.36.5.  We must therefore make it possible when speaking of unknown places to convey to the reader a more or less real and familiar notion of them. 3.37.6.  These two divisions of the earth, then, regarded from a general point of view, occupy the part of it which lies to the south of the Mediterranean, reaching from east to west. 3.37.7.  Europe lies opposite to them on the north shore of this sea, extending continuously from east to west 3.37.10.  The remaining part of Europe beyond the Pyrenees reaching to its western end and to the Pillars of Hercules is bounded on the one side by the Mediterranean and on the other by the Outer Sea, that portion of which is washed by the Mediterranean as far as the Pillars of Hercules being called Iberia 3.37.11.  while that part which lies along the Outer or Great Sea has no general name, as it has only recently come under notice, but is all densely inhabited by barbarous tribes of whom I shall speak more particularly on a subsequent occasion. 3.38.2.  so that part of Europe which extends to the north between the Don and Narbo is up to now unknown to us, and will remain so unless the curiosity of explorers lead to some discoveries in the future. 3.39.8.  From Emporium to Narbo it is about six hundred stades, and from Narbo to the passage of the Rhone about sixteen hundred, this part of the road having now been carefully measured by the Romans and marked with milestones at every eighth stade. 3.58.2.  While nearly all authors or at least the greater number have attempted to describe the peculiarities and the situation of the countries at the extremities of the known world 3.59.3.  But in our own times since, owing to Alexander's empire in Asia and that of the Romans in other parts of the world, nearly all regions have become approachable by sea or land 3.59.4.  since our men of action in Greece are relieved from the ambitions of a military or political career and have therefore ample means for inquiry and study 10.7.3.  When subsequently he heard that the allies on the Roman side of the Ebro remained friendly, and that the Carthaginian commanders had fallen out with each other and were treating their subjects tyrannically, he felt full confidence in the result of his expedition, relying not on chance but on inference from the facts. 34.9.13.  Polybius in enumerating the tribes and cities of the Paccaei and Celtiberians counts among the other cities Segesama and Intercatia. Thayer's Note: The following fragment was overlooked by the Loeb editor: (Strabo, III.4.13, C 62) 39.4. 1.  After the appointment of the ten commissioners which took place in Achaea, these commissioners ordered the quaestor who was about to sell the property of Diaeus to set aside and present to Polybius whatever objects he chose to select for himself and then sell the rest to bidders.,2.  Polybius was so far from accepting any gift of the kind that he even begged his friends not to desire to acquire any of the things sold by the quaestor, who was now visiting the cities, and selling the property of all who had sided with Diaeus and had been condemned, except those who had children or parents.,4.  Some of his friends did not pay attention to his advice, but those who followed it earned the high approval of their fellow-citizens.
2. Strabo, Geography, 2.4.7, 3.4.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.4.7. Further, the length of the inhabited earth is measured on a line parallel with the equator, as it is in this direction that its greatest length lies: in the same way with respect to each of the continents, we must take their length as it lies between two meridians. The measure of these lengths consists of a certain number of stadia, which we obtain either by going over the places themselves, or roads or ways parallel thereto. Polybius abandons this method, and adopts the new way of taking the segment of the northern semicircle comprised between the summer rising and the equinoctial rising. But no one ought to calculate by variable rules or measures in determining the length of fixed distances: nor yet should he make use of the phenomena of the heavens, which appear different when observed from different points, for distances which have their length determined by themselves and remain unchanged. The length of a country never varies, but depends upon itself; whereas, the equinoctial rising and setting, and the summer and winter rising and setting, depend not on themselves, but on our position [with respect to them]. As we shift from place to place, the equinoctial rising and setting, and the winter and summer rising and setting, shift with us; but the length of a continent always remains the same. To make the Tanais and the Nile the bounds of these continents, is nothing out of the way, but it is something strange to employ for this purpose the equinoctial rising and the summer rising. 3.4.12. Immediately after passing Idubeda, you enter on Keltiberia, a large and irregular country. It is for the most part rugged, and watered by rivers, being traversed by the Ana, the Tagus, and many other of the rivers which flow into the western sea, but have their sources in Keltiberia. of their number is the Douro, which flows by Numantia and Serguntia. The Baetis rises in Orospeda, and after passing through Oretania, enters Baetica. The Berones inhabit the districts north of the Keltiberians, and are neighbours of the Conish Cantabrians. They likewise had their origin in the Keltic expedition. Their city is Varia, situated near to the passage of the Ebro. They are adjacent to the Bardyitae, now called the Bardyli. To the west [of the Keltiberians] are certain of the Astures, Gallicians, and Vaccaei, besides Vettones and Carpetani. On the south are the Oretani, and the other inhabitants of Orospeda, both Bastetani and Edetani, and to the east is Idubeda.
3. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 3.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander the great Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63
betis, river Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
celtiberians Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
columns of heracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56
distances Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63
gaul Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
gibraltar) Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
hannibal Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63
iberia Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
iberus/ebro Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
idubeda, mount Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
italy Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63
mediterranean Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56
milestones Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63
oikoumene Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63
polybius, geographical digression Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56
polybius Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56, 63
pyrenees Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56
rome Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
sophocles, space, knowledge and representation of Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63
space, knowledge and representation of König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63
strabo Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 56
tagus Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 284
terra marique' König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63
terra marique Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 63