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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9640
Polyaenus, Stratagems, 8.35
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

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1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.146 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.146. For this reason, and for no other, the Ionians too made twelve cities; for it would be foolishness to say that these are more truly Ionian or better born than the other Ionians; since not the least part of them are Abantes from Euboea, who are not Ionians even in name, and there are mingled with them Minyans of Orchomenus, Cadmeans, Dryopians, Phocian renegades from their nation, Molossians, Pelasgian Arcadians, Dorians of Epidaurus, and many other tribes; ,and as for those who came from the very town-hall of Athens and think they are the best born of the Ionians, these did not bring wives with them to their settlements, but married Carian women whose parents they had put to death. ,For this slaughter, these women made a custom and bound themselves by oath (and enjoined it on their daughters) that no one would sit at table with her husband or call him by his name, because the men had married them after slaying their fathers and husbands and sons. This happened at Miletus .
2. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 2.497 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Strabo, Geography, 6.1.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.1.15. Next in order comes Metapontium, which is one hundred and forty stadia from the naval station of Heracleia. It is said to have been founded by the Pylians who sailed from Troy with Nestor; and they so prospered from farming, it is said, that they dedicated a golden harvest at Delphi. And writers produce as a sign of its having been founded by the Pylians the sacrifice to the shades of the sons of Neleus. However, the city was wiped out by the Samnitae. According to Antiochus: Certain of the Achaeans were sent for by the Achaeans in Sybaris and resettled the place, then forsaken, but they were summoned only because of a hatred which the Achaeans who had been banished from Laconia had for the Tarantini, in order that the neighboring Tarantini might not pounce upon the place; there were two cities, but since, of the two, Metapontium was nearer to Taras, the newcomers were persuaded by the Sybarites to take Metapontium and hold it, for, if they held this, they would also hold the territory of Siris, whereas, if they turned to the territory of Siris, they would add Metapontium to the territory of the Tarantini, which latter was on the very flank of Metapontium; and when, later on, the Metapontians were at war with the Tarantini and the Oinotrians of the interior, a reconciliation was effected in regard to a portion of the land — that portion, indeed, which marked the boundary between the Italy of that time and Iapygia. Here, too, the fabulous accounts place Metapontus, and also Melanippe the prisoner and her son Boeotus. In the opinion of Antiochus, the city Metapontium was first called Metabum and later on its name was slightly altered, and further, Melanippe was brought, not to Metabus, but to Dius, as is proved by a hero-sanctuary of Metabus, and also by Asius the poet, when he says that Boeotus was brought forth in the halls of Dius by shapely Melanippe, meaning that Melanippe was brought to Dius, not to Metabus. But, as Ephorus says, the colonizer of Metapontium was Daulius, the tyrant of the Crisa which is near Delphi. And there is this further account, that the man who was sent by the Achaeans to help colonize it was Leucippus, and that after procuring the use of the place from the Tarantini for only a day and night he would not give it back, replying by day to those who asked it back that he had asked and taken it for the next night also, and by night that he had taken and asked it also for the next day. Next in order comes Taras and Iapygia; but before discussing them I shall, in accordance with my original purpose, give a general description of the islands that lie in front of Italy; for as from time to time I have named also the islands which neighbor upon the several tribes, so now, since I have traversed Oinotria from beginning to end, which alone the people of earlier times called Italy, it is right that I should preserve the same order in traversing Sicily and the islands round about it.
4. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.14.6, 3.22.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.14.6. The Lacedaemonians give the name Running Course to the place where it is the custom for the young men even down to the present day to practise running. As you go to this Course from the grave of the Agiadae, you see on the left the tomb of Eumedes—this Eumedes was one of the children of Hippocoon—and also an old image of Heracles, to whom sacrifice is paid by the Sphaereis. These are those who are just passing from youth to manhood. In the Course are two gymnastic schools, one being a votive gift of Eurycles, a Spartan. Outside the Course, over against the image of Heracles, there is a house belonging now to a private individual, but in olden times to Menelaus. Farther away from the Course are sanctuaries of the Dioscuri, of the Graces, of Eileithyia, of Apollo Carneus, and of Artemis Leader. 3.22.12. When the inhabitants of these cities were expelled, they were anxious to know where they ought to settle, and an oracle was given them that Artemis would show them where they were to dwell. When therefore they had gone on shore, and a hare appeared to them, they looked upon the hare as their guide on the way. When it dived into a myrtle tree, they built a city on the site of the myrtle, and down to this day they worship that myrtle tree, and name Artemis Saviour.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acontius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
aegeira, cult of artemis agrotera at Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
aetia, book 3 Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
agora, athens, artemis, cult of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
agora, athens, prytaneion Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
agrotera Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
animals, artemis as mistress of beasts, Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
apollo, artemis and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
apollo, sanctuaries and temples Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
apollo carneius Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
archaic and classical periods, in works, of callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
artemis, animals, association with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis, apollo and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis, cult and rites Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis, migration/movement of peoples, association with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis, sanctuaries and temples Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis boulaia Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis boulephoros Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis chitone Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis hegemone Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
artemis soteira Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
athens, artemis, cult of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
boeae, cult of artemis soteira at Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
bouphonia (delos) Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
callimachus, and characterization Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
carians Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 49
characterization, in callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
didyma Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 49
dorian migration Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
eros, as erotodidaskalos Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
erotic poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
goats, artemis/hunting goddesses and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
hellanicus Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 49
individual figures, in callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
ionian migration Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
justice and political life, association of artemis with political assemblies and civic life Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
linear b, pylos tablets Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
migration/movement of peoples, artemis associated with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
migration/movement of peoples, dorian migration Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
migration/movement of peoples, ionian migration Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
miletus, artemis boulephoros, cult of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
miletus, ionian migration to Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 49
miletus Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 49
minoan-mycenaean religion and art, artemis and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
neileus Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 49
neleis (festival) Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
neleus and neleids Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
nestor Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
odysseus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
oikist' Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 49
oracles, animal oracles and artemis Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
ortygia, cult of artemis on Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
pardini, a. Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
phrygius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483
pylos, artemis, cult of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
pylos, linear b tablets from Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
quail, sacred to artemis Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for artemis Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
sanctuaries and temples, of apollo Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
sanctuaries and temples, of artemis Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
sparta, sanctuary of artemis hegemone and apollo carneius Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 174
xenophon of ephesus, ephesiaca Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 483