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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9615
Plutarch, Solon, 19.2


τὴν δʼ ἄνω βουλὴν ἐπίσκοπον πάντων καὶ φύλακα τῶν νόμων ἐκάθισεν, οἰόμενος ἐπὶ δυσὶ βουλαῖς ὥσπερ ἀγκύραις ὁρμοῦσαν ἧττον ἐν σάλῳ τὴν πόλιν ἔσεσθαι καὶ μᾶλλον ἀτρεμοῦντα τὸν δῆμον παρέξειν. οἱ μὲν οὖν πλεῖστοι τὴν ἐξ Ἀρείου πάγου βουλήν, ὥσπερ εἴρηται, Σόλωνα συστήσασθαί φασι· καὶ μαρτυρεῖν αὐτοῖς δοκεῖ μάλιστα τὸ μηδαμοῦ τὸν Δράκοντα λέγειν μηδʼ ὀνομάζειν Ἀρεοπαγίτας, ἀλλὰ τοῖς ἐφέταις ἀεὶ διαλέγεσθαι περὶ τῶν φονικῶν.Then he made the upper council a general overseer in the state, and guardian of the laws, thinking that the city with its two councils, riding as it were at double anchor, would be less tossed by the surges, and would keep its populace in greater quiet. Now most writers say that the council of the Areiopagus, as I have stated, was established by Solon. And their view seems to be strongly supported by the fact that Draco nowhere makes any mention whatsoever of Areiopagites, but always addresses himself to the ephetai in cases of homicide.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.188-2.197, 2.203-2.206 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.188. /But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. 2.189. /But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. Whomsoever he met that was a chieftain or man of note, to his side would he come and with gentle words seek to restrain him, saying: 2.190. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.191. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.192. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.193. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.194. / Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? 2.195. /Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying 2.196. /Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying 2.197. /Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying 2.203. / Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord 2.204. / Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord 2.205. /one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea 2.206. /one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 527-531, 526 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

526. μήτʼ ἀνάρχετον βίον 526. Do not approve of a lawless life or one subject to a tyrant.
3. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 239-245, 399-408, 238 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Herodotus, Histories, 5.72.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.54.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.54.6. For the rest, the city was left in full enjoyment of its existing laws, except that care was always taken to have the offices in the hands of some one of the family. Among those of them that held the yearly archonship at Athens was Pisistratus, son of the tyrant Hippias, and named after his grandfather, who dedicated during his term of office the altar to the twelve gods in the market-place, and that of Apollo in the Pythian precinct.
7. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 8.1, 8.4, 21.3, 22.5, 31.1, 47.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Demosthenes, Orations, 56.44 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Philochorus, Fragments, 64 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Plutarch, Solon, 14.6, 19.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.6. And as for the ridicule which many heaped upon him for refusing the tyranny, he has written as follows;— Solon was a shallow thinker and a man of counsel void; When the gods would give him blessings, of his own will he refused. When his net was full of fish, amazed, he would not pull it in, All for lack of spirit, and because he was bereft of sense. I had certainly been willing, for the power, and boundless wealth, And to be tyrant over Athens no more than a single day, Then to have a pouch flayed from me, and my lineage blotted out. Fragment 33 (Bergk). Solon, Frag. 33 (Bergk). 19.1. After he had established the council of the Areiopagus, consisting of those who had been archons year by year (and he himself was a member of this body since he had been archon), he observed that the common people were uneasy and bold in consequence of their release from debt, and therefore established another council besides, consisting of four hundred men, one hundred chosen from each of the four tribes. Cf. Aristot. Const. Ath. 8.4 . These were to deliberate on public matters before the people did, and were not to allow any matter to come before the popular assembly without such previous deliberation.
11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.49, 1.53 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.53. I am not the only man who has aimed at a tyranny in Greece, nor am I, a descendant of Codrus, unfitted for the part. That is, I resume the privileges which the Athenians swore to confer upon Codrus and his family, although later they took them away. In everything else I commit no offence against God or man; but I leave to the Athenians the management of their affairs according to the ordices established by you. And they are better governed than they would be under a democracy; for I allow no one to extend his rights, and though I am tyrant I arrogate to myself no undue share of reputation and honour, but merely such stated privileges as belonged to the kings in former times. Every citizen pays a tithe of his property, not to me but to a fund for defraying the cost of the public sacrifices or any other charges on the State or the expenditure on any war which may come upon us.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
archons Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 82
areopagite council Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 212
areopagus, council of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 82
areopagus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
aristotle Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
assembly, athenian (ekklesia) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
callimachus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
chios Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
class, relations Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
class Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
cleomenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
constitution, ancestral Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
constitution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 82
control, political Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
council, chian Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
council, of five hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
council, of four hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 82
council, spartan (gerousia) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
council Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
delphi Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
democracy, in tragedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 212
demos (damos), empowerment of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
demos (damos), limitations placed on Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
demosthenes, orator Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
diogenes laertius Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
election Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
eupatrids Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
four-hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
great rhetra Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
hansen, mogens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
herodotus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
hignett, charles Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
jurors, juries, athenian (dikastai) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
law, laws Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
law Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
legislator Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
lycurgus (spartan lawgiver) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
megara, megarians Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
metaphor, metaphorical Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
monarchy, proto-democratic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 212
odysseus (hero) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 212
oligarchy, oligarchs Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 82
oracle Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
plutarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
polemarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
probouleusis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
public office, officials, accountability of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
reform, constitutional Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
revolution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
salamis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
ship, as metaphor Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259
ship of state Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 212
solon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 259; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 82
solon (lawmaker and poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 212
sortition Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
sources, material Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
sparta, spartans Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
theseus (hero) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 212
tyranny, tyrants Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
wealth Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
zeugitai' Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64