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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9604
Plutarch, Pyrrhus, 3.4
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.66 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Livy, History, 1.57 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 6.213-6.218 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.213. I asked whether I should assign the Nones to Sancus 6.214. Or Fidius, or you Father Semo: Sancus answered me: 6.215. ‘Whichever you assign it to, the honour’s mine: 6.216. I bear all three names: so Cures willed it.’ 6.217. The Sabines of old granted him a shrine accordingly 6.218. And established it on the Quirinal Hill.
4. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.20, 8.194 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Augustus, 73 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Histories, 4.81 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.81.  During the months while Vespasian was waiting at Alexandria for the regular season of the summer winds and a settled sea, many marvels continued to mark the favour of heaven and a certain partiality of the gods toward him. One of the common people of Alexandria, well known for his loss of sight, threw himself before Vespasian's knees, praying him with groans to cure his blindness, being so directed by the god Serapis, whom this most superstitious of nations worships before all others; and he besought the emperor to deign to moisten his cheeks and eyes with his spittle. Another, whose hand was useless, prompted by the same god, begged Caesar to step and trample on it. Vespasian at first ridiculed these appeals and treated them with scorn; then, when the men persisted, he began at one moment to fear the discredit of failure, at another to be inspired with hopes of success by the appeals of the suppliants and the flattery of his courtiers: finally, he directed the physicians to give their opinion as to whether such blindness and infirmity could be overcome by human aid. Their reply treated the two cases differently: they said that in the first the power of sight had not been completely eaten away and it would return if the obstacles were removed; in the other, the joints had slipped and become displaced, but they could be restored if a healing pressure were applied to them. Such perhaps was the wish of the gods, and it might be that the emperor had been chosen for this divine service; in any case, if a cure were obtained, the glory would be Caesar's, but in the event of failure, ridicule would fall only on the poor suppliants. So Vespasian, believing that his good fortune was capable of anything and that nothing was any longer incredible, with a smiling countece, and amid intense excitement on the part of the bystanders, did as he was asked to do. The hand was instantly restored to use, and the day again shone for the blind man. Both facts are told by eye-witnesses even now when falsehood brings no reward.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
africa Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
alexander the great, and the alexander mosaic Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
augustus, wears home spun garments Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
blindness Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
caecilia, gaia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
carthage, and restoration of cultural property Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
charismatic wonderworkers, hadrian and vespasian Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
charismatic wonderworkers Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
cornelius scipio aemilianus, p., repatriates art works to sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
dominus et deus, and the forum transitorium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
domitian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
dreams Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
hadrian Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
lucretia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
marius priscus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
minerva, and arachne Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
miracle Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
nerva Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
objects, repatriation of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
preference for realism, on scipios restoration of property Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
prosecutes marius priscus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
pyrrhus, healing powers of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53, 174
rome, forum of nerva Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
rome, temple of fortuna seiani Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
rome, temple of semo sancus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
rüpke, j., sabines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
serapis Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
servius tullius, robe of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
sicily, cultural property restored to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
simulacrum versus signum, of women Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
statuary, miraculous properties of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
tacitus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
tarquin the proud Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
tarquinius priscus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
touch miracles' Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
tullius cicero, m., on scipio aemilianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
verres, c., looting of sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 53
vespasian Nutzman, Contested Cures: Identity and Ritual Healing in Roman and Late Antique Palestine (2022) 175
women, idealized values and Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174
women Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 174