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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9595
Plutarch, Pericles, 9


nanThucydides describes In the encomium on Pericles, Thuc. 2.65.9 . the administration of Pericles as rather aristocratic,— in name a democracy, but in fact a government by the greatest citizen. But many others say that the people was first led on by him into allotments of public lands, festival-grants, and distributions of fees for public services, thereby falling into bad habits, and becoming luxurious and wanton under the influence of his public measures, instead of frugal and self-sufficing. Let us therefore examine in detail the reason for this change in him. The discussion of this change in Pericles from the methods of a demagogue to the leadership described by Thucydides, continues through chapter 15.,In the beginning, as has been said, pitted as he was against the reputation of Cimon, he tried to ingratiate himself with the people. And since he was the inferior in wealth and property, by means of which Cimon would win over the poor,—furnishing a dinner every day to any Athenian who wanted it, bestowing raiment on the elderly men, and removing the fences from his estates that whosoever wished might pluck the fruit,—Pericles, outdone in popular arts of this sort, had recourse to the distribution of the people’s own wealth. This was on the advice of Damonides, of the deme Oa, as Aristotle has stated. Aristot. Const. Ath. 27.4 .,And soon, what with festival-grants and jurors’ wages and other fees and largesses, he bribed the multitude by the wholesale, and used them in opposition to the Council of the Areiopagus. Of this body he himself was not a member, since the lot had not made him either First Archon, or Archon Thesmothete, or King Archon, or Archon Polemarch. These offices were in ancient times filled by lot, and through them those who properly acquitted themselves were promoted into the Areiopagus.,For this reason all the more did Pericles, strong in the affections of the people, lead a successful party against the Council of the Areiopagus. Not only was the Council robbed of most of its jurisdiction by Ephialtes, but Cimon also, on the charge of being a lover of Sparta and a hater of the people, was ostracized, 461 B.C. Cf. Plut. Cim. 16.2 . —a man who yielded to none in wealth and lineage, who had won most glorious victories over the Barbarians, and had filled the city full of money and spoils, as is written in his Life. Such was the power of Pericles among the people.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 525-527, 524 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

524. πόρνην δὲ Σιμαίθαν ἰόντες Μεγαράδε
2. Cratinus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Cratinus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Theopompus of Chios, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.90, 1.100, 1.127, 2.13.3, 2.65, 3.34, 6.15-6.16, 6.28, 6.42, 6.51, 7.76-7.77, 7.77.2, 7.86.5, 8.73.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.13.3. Here they had no reason to despond. Apart from other sources of income, an average revenue of six hundred talents of silver was drawn from the tribute of the allies; and there were still six thousand talents of coined silver in the Acropolis, out of nine thousand seven hundred that had once been there, from which the money had been taken for the porch of the Acropolis, the other public buildings, and for Potidaea . 7.77.2. I myself who am not superior to any of you in strength—indeed you see how I am in my sickness—and who in the gifts of fortune am, I think, whether in private life or otherwise, the equal of any, am now exposed to the same danger as the meanest among you; and yet my life has been one of much devotion towards the gods, and of much justice and without offence towards men. 7.86.5. This or the like was the cause of the death of a man who, of all the Hellenes in my time, least deserved such a fate, seeing that the whole course of his life had been regulated with strict attention to virtue.
6. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 27.2-27.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Cratinus Iunior, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 14.8, 17.1-17.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.1. On Sicily the Athenians had cast longing eyes even while Pericles was living; and after his death they actually tried to lay hands upon it. The lesser expeditions which they sent thither from time to time, ostensibly for the aid and comfort of their allies on the island who were being wronged by the Syracusans, they regarded merely as stepping stones to the greater expedition of conquest. 17.2. But the man who finally fanned this desire of theirs into flame, and persuaded them not to attempt the island any more in part and little by little, but to sail thither with a great armament and subdue it utterly, was Alcibiades; he persuaded the people to have great hopes, and he himself had greater aspirations still. Such were his hopes that he regarded Sicily as a mere beginning, and not, like the rest, as an end of the expedition. 17.3. So while Nicias was trying to divert the people from the capture of Syracuse as an undertaking too difficult for them, Alcibiades was dreaming of Carthage and Libya, and, after winning these, of at once encompassing Italy and Peloponnesus. He almost regarded Sicily as the ways and means provided for his greater war. The young men were at once carried away on the wings of such hopes, and their elders kept recounting in their ears many wonderful things about the projected expedition. Many were they who sat in the palaestras and lounging-places mapping out in the sand the shape of Sicily and the position of Libya and Carthage. Cf. Plut. Nic. 12.1-2 . 17.4. Socrates the philosopher, however, and Meton the astrologer, are said to have had no hopes that any good would come to the city from this expedition; Socrates, as it is likely, because he got an inkling of the future from the divine guide who was his familiar. Meton—whether his fear of the future arose from mere calculation or from his use of some sort of divination—feigned madness, and seizing a blazing torch, was like to have set fire to his own house.
9. Plutarch, Cimon, 10.5, 13.7-13.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Comparison of Fabius With Pericles, 1.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Plutarch, Nicias, 26.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Pericles, 3.5, 7.1, 7.3, 11.4, 13.16, 15.1, 16.1, 20.4, 21.1, 22.1, 30.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.4. At this time, therefore, particularly, Pericles gave the reins to the people, and made his policy one of pleasing them, ever devising some sort of a pageant in the town for the masses, or a feast, or a procession, amusing them like children with not uncouth delights, An iambic trimeter from an unknown source. and sending out sixty triremes annually, on which large numbers of the citizens sailed about for eight months under pay, practising at the same time and acquiring the art of seamanship. 15.1. Thus, then, seeing that political differences were entirely remitted and the city had become a smooth surface, as it were, and altogether united, he brought under his own control Athens and all the issues dependent on the Athenians,—tributes, armies, triremes, the islands, the sea, the vast power derived from Hellenes, vast also from Barbarians, and a supremacy that was securely hedged about with subject nations, royal friendships, and dynastic alliances. 16.1. of his power there can be no doubt, since Thucydides gives so clear an exposition of it, and the comic poets unwittingly reveal it even in their malicious gibes, calling him and his associates new Peisistratidae, and urging him to take solemn oath not to make himself a tyrant, on the plea, forsooth, that his preeminence was incommensurate with a democracy and too oppressive. 21.1. But Pericles was ever trying to restrain this extravagance of theirs, to lop off their expansive meddlesomeness, and to divert the greatest part of their forces to the guarding and securing of what they had already won. He considered it a great achievement to hold the Lacedaemonians in check, and set himself in opposition to these in every way, as he showed, above all other things, by what he did in the Sacred War. About 448 B.C. 22.1. That he was right in seeking to confine the power of the Athenians within lesser Greece, was amply proved by what came to pass. To begin with, the Euboeans revolted, 446. B.C. and he crossed over to the island with a hostile force. Then straightway word was brought to him that the Megarians had gone over to the enemy, and that an army of the enemy was on the confines of Attica under the leadership of Pleistoanax, the king of the Lacedaemonians. 30.4. But the Megarians denied the murder of Anthemocritus, and threw the blame for Athenian hate on Aspasia and Pericles, appealing to those far-famed and hackneyed versicles of the Acharnians :— Simaetha, harlot, one of Megara’s womankind, Was stolen by gilded youths more drunk than otherwise; And so the Megarians, pangs of wrath all reeking hot, Paid back the theft and raped of Aspasia’s harlots two. Verses 524 ff.
13. Plutarch, Themistocles, 27, 25 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
"house" (of prostitution) Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
academy Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
acropolis of athens Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
alcibiades, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
animals, misogynistic likening to women Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
aspasia Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
athenaeus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
athenian Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
athenians, and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athenians, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
athens Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96; Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
audience, the subjects interaction with his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
brothels Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
characterisation, of the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
charity Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
cimon, benefactions of Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
cimon Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96; Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
closure (endings of biographies) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
cognition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
comedy Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
community, the subject and his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
contrasts, as theme in plutarchs narrative Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
contrasts Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
cratinus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
criticism, and counter-suggestibility Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
criticism, contemporary to the story narrated, exercised by onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
demagoguery, demagogues Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
demes, athenian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
diodorus siculus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
dēmos Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
emotions Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
envy Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
ephorus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
explanations Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
feelings Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
fortune Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
gifts, to individuals as benefactions for the community Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
god(dess) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
gorgias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
hetairai Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
historiography Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
history Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
julian, jury service, payment for Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
jury pay Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
laciadae Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
law courts Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
liturgies, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
liturgies Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
long walls, athens Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
minds, internal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
minds, the subjects engagement with others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
moral turnaround Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
nepos' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 672
nepos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
nicias, and sicilian expedition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias, compared with pericles and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias, in thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
peloponnesian war Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
pericles, and aspasia Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
pericles, and the hostile public mind Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
pericles, sexuality Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
pericles, sons Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96; Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
pericles the younger Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
phidias Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
pisistratus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
plato, platonic Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
plutarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
politics, the subjects preoccupation with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
politics Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
poor, the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
popular courts, athenian Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
prostitution Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
ps.-aristotle, athenaion politeia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
psychology, psychological, ability of the subjects to be attuned to others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
psychology, psychological Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
reflection, the readers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
reflection, the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
retrospection (backward movement) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
sicilians/sicily Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
simaetha (megarian prostitute) Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 194
social/society, dialogue of individual with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
social/society, plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
social/society, plutarchs reconstruction of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
social/society Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
sparta(ns) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
speech(es) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
stoa of the herms Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
theophrastus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
theopompus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140
theseion Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 74
thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
tyranny/tyrants Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
understand(ing) (as part of the process of moral evaluation) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
wealth Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 140