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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9595
Plutarch, Pericles, 29.7
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.139.4, 1.140.4, 8.86.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.139.4. There were many speakers who came forward and gave their support to one side or the other, urging the necessity of war, or the revocation of the decree and the folly of allowing it to stand in the way of peace. Among them came forward Pericles, son of Xanthippus, the first man of his time at Athens, ablest alike in counsel and in action, and gave the following advice:— 1.140.4. I hope that you will none of you think that we shall be going to war for a trifle if we refuse to revoke the Megara decree, which appears in front of their complaints, and the revocation of which is to save us from war, or let any feeling of self-reproach linger in your minds, as if you went to war for slight cause. 8.86.4. Besides these they made a number of other statements which had no better success with their angry auditors; and amid a host of different opinions the one which found most favour was that of sailing to Piraeus . Now it was that Alcibiades for the first time did the state a service, and one of the most signal kind. For when the Athenians at Samos were bent upon sailing against their countrymen, in which case Ionia and the Hellespont would most certainly at once have passed into possession of the enemy, Alcibiades it was who prevented them.
2. Plutarch, Demetrius, 23.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, Demosthenes, 14.2, 20.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Pericles, 17.1, 21.1, 29.1, 37.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.1. When the Lacedaemonians began to be annoyed by the increasing power of the Athenians, Pericles, by way of inciting the people to cherish yet loftier thoughts and to deem it worthy of great achievements, introduced a bill to the effect that all Hellenes wheresoever resident in Europe or in Asia, small and large cities alike, should be invited to send deputies to a council at Athens. This was to deliberate concerning the Hellenic sanctuaries which the Barbarians had burned down, concerning the sacrifices which were due to the gods in the name of Hellas in fulfillment of vows made when they were fighting with the Barbarians, and concerning the sea, that all might sail it fearlessly and keep the peace. 21.1. But Pericles was ever trying to restrain this extravagance of theirs, to lop off their expansive meddlesomeness, and to divert the greatest part of their forces to the guarding and securing of what they had already won. He considered it a great achievement to hold the Lacedaemonians in check, and set himself in opposition to these in every way, as he showed, above all other things, by what he did in the Sacred War. About 448 B.C. 29.1. After this, when the billows of the Peloponnesian War were already rising and swelling, he persuaded the people to send aid and succour to the Corcyraeans 433 B.C. in their war with the Corinthians, and so to attach to themselves an island with a vigorous naval power at a time when the Peloponnesians were as good as actually at war with them. 37.5. It was, accordingly, a grave matter, that the law which had been rigorously enforced against so many should now be suspended by the very man who had introduced it, and yet the calamities which Pericles was then suffering in his family life, regarded as a kind of penalty which he had paid for his arrogance and haughtiness of old, broke down the objections of the Athenians. They thought that what he suffered was by way of retribution, and that what he asked became a man to ask and men to grant, and so they suffered him to enroll his illegitimate son in the phratry-lists and to give him his own name. This was the son who afterwards conquered the Peloponnesians in a naval battle at the Arginusae islands, 406 B.C. and was put to death by the people along with his fellow-generals.
5. Plutarch, Phocion, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(blurred) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
ambiguity Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
archidamus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athena, parthenon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athena Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
comedy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demades Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demetrius poliorcetes Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demosthenes, orator Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
generals Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
ion of chios Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
kosmopolites, cultural Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
minds, internal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
minds, internal and external, intertwined Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
minds Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
narrator Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
peloponnesian war Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
pericles, and the hostile public mind Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
perspectives, of plutarch Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
perspectives, of the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
perspectives, presentation of different' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
philip ii Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
phocion Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
politician Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
ship, as metaphor Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
space Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
stesimbrotus, of thasos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 58
verbal Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115