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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9595
Plutarch, Pericles, 29.1


μετὰ ταῦτα κυμαίνοντος ἤδη τοῦ Πελοποννησιακοῦ πολέμου, Κερκυραίοις πολεμουμένοις ὑπὸ Κορινθίων ἔπεισε τὸν δῆμον ἀποστεῖλαι βοήθειαν καὶ προσλαβεῖν ἐρρωμένην ναυτικῇ δυνάμει νῆσον, ὡς ὅσον οὐδέπω Πελοποννησίων ἐκπεπολεμωμένων πρὸς αὐτούς.After this, when the billows of the Peloponnesian War were already rising and swelling, he persuaded the people to send aid and succour to the Corcyraeans 433 B.C. in their war with the Corinthians, and so to attach to themselves an island with a vigorous naval power at a time when the Peloponnesians were as good as actually at war with them.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.65.5-2.65.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.65.5. For as long as he was at the head of the state during the peace, he pursued a moderate and conservative policy; and in his time its greatness was at its height. When the war broke out, here also he seems to have rightly gauged the power of his country. 2.65.6. He outlived its commencement two years and six months, and the correctness of his previsions respecting it became better known by his death. 2.65.7. He told them to wait quietly, to pay attention to their marine, to attempt no new conquests, and to expose the city to no hazards during the war, and doing this, promised them a favorable result. What they did was the very contrary, allowing private ambitions and private interests, in matters apparently quite foreign to the war, to lead them into projects unjust both to themselves and to their allies—projects whose success would only conduce to the honor and advantage of private persons, and whose failure entailed certain disaster on the country in the war. 2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen. 2.65.10. With his successors it was different. More on a level with one another, and each grasping at supremacy, they ended by committing even the conduct of state affairs to the whims of the multitude.
2. Plutarch, Demetrius, 23.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, Demosthenes, 14.2, 20.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Pericles, 17.1, 21.1, 29.2, 29.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.1. When the Lacedaemonians began to be annoyed by the increasing power of the Athenians, Pericles, by way of inciting the people to cherish yet loftier thoughts and to deem it worthy of great achievements, introduced a bill to the effect that all Hellenes wheresoever resident in Europe or in Asia, small and large cities alike, should be invited to send deputies to a council at Athens. This was to deliberate concerning the Hellenic sanctuaries which the Barbarians had burned down, concerning the sacrifices which were due to the gods in the name of Hellas in fulfillment of vows made when they were fighting with the Barbarians, and concerning the sea, that all might sail it fearlessly and keep the peace. 21.1. But Pericles was ever trying to restrain this extravagance of theirs, to lop off their expansive meddlesomeness, and to divert the greatest part of their forces to the guarding and securing of what they had already won. He considered it a great achievement to hold the Lacedaemonians in check, and set himself in opposition to these in every way, as he showed, above all other things, by what he did in the Sacred War. About 448 B.C.
5. Plutarch, Phocion, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
archidamus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athena, parthenon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athena Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
cimon Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
citizen Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
comedy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
control, political Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
corcyra Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
corcyraeans Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
corinth Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
demades Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demetrius poliorcetes Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demosthenes, orator Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
drama Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
experience Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
generals Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
ion of chios Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
kosmopolites, cultural Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
lakedaimonios Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
metaphor, metaphorical Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
oligarchic conspiracy/revolution (nan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
peloponnesian war Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115, 265
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
philip ii Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
phocion Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
plague' Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
plato Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
politician Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115, 265
ship, as metaphor Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115, 265
space Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
spectacle Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
stesimbrotus, of thasos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
thirty years peace Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
thucydides, son of melesias, audience, reader Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 534
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
varro, c. terentius Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 265
verbal Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115