Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9595
Plutarch, Pericles, 21.1


ἀλλʼ ὁ Περικλῆς κατεῖχε τὴν ἐκδρομὴν ταύτην καὶ περιέκοπτε τὴν πολυπραγμοσύνην, καὶ τὰ πλεῖστα τῆς δυνάμεως ἔτρεπεν εἰς φυλακὴν καὶ βεβαιότητα τῶν ὑπαρχόντων, μέγα ἔργον ἡγούμενος ἀνείργειν Λακεδαιμονίους καὶ ὅλως ὑπεναντιούμενος ἐκείνοις, ὡς ἄλλοις τε πολλοῖς ἔδειξε καὶ μάλιστα τοῖς περὶ τὸν ἱερὸν πραχθεῖσι πόλεμον.But Pericles was ever trying to restrain this extravagance of theirs, to lop off their expansive meddlesomeness, and to divert the greatest part of their forces to the guarding and securing of what they had already won. He considered it a great achievement to hold the Lacedaemonians in check, and set himself in opposition to these in every way, as he showed, above all other things, by what he did in the Sacred War. About 448 B.C.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Plutarch, Comparison of Fabius With Pericles, 1.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Plutarch, Demetrius, 23.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, Demosthenes, 14.2, 20.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Pericles, 3.5, 7.1, 7.3, 11.4, 13.16, 15.1, 16.1, 17.1, 20.4, 22.1, 29.1, 29.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.4. At this time, therefore, particularly, Pericles gave the reins to the people, and made his policy one of pleasing them, ever devising some sort of a pageant in the town for the masses, or a feast, or a procession, amusing them like children with not uncouth delights, An iambic trimeter from an unknown source. and sending out sixty triremes annually, on which large numbers of the citizens sailed about for eight months under pay, practising at the same time and acquiring the art of seamanship. 15.1. Thus, then, seeing that political differences were entirely remitted and the city had become a smooth surface, as it were, and altogether united, he brought under his own control Athens and all the issues dependent on the Athenians,—tributes, armies, triremes, the islands, the sea, the vast power derived from Hellenes, vast also from Barbarians, and a supremacy that was securely hedged about with subject nations, royal friendships, and dynastic alliances. 16.1. of his power there can be no doubt, since Thucydides gives so clear an exposition of it, and the comic poets unwittingly reveal it even in their malicious gibes, calling him and his associates new Peisistratidae, and urging him to take solemn oath not to make himself a tyrant, on the plea, forsooth, that his preeminence was incommensurate with a democracy and too oppressive. 17.1. When the Lacedaemonians began to be annoyed by the increasing power of the Athenians, Pericles, by way of inciting the people to cherish yet loftier thoughts and to deem it worthy of great achievements, introduced a bill to the effect that all Hellenes wheresoever resident in Europe or in Asia, small and large cities alike, should be invited to send deputies to a council at Athens. This was to deliberate concerning the Hellenic sanctuaries which the Barbarians had burned down, concerning the sacrifices which were due to the gods in the name of Hellas in fulfillment of vows made when they were fighting with the Barbarians, and concerning the sea, that all might sail it fearlessly and keep the peace. 22.1. That he was right in seeking to confine the power of the Athenians within lesser Greece, was amply proved by what came to pass. To begin with, the Euboeans revolted, 446. B.C. and he crossed over to the island with a hostile force. Then straightway word was brought to him that the Megarians had gone over to the enemy, and that an army of the enemy was on the confines of Attica under the leadership of Pleistoanax, the king of the Lacedaemonians. 29.1. After this, when the billows of the Peloponnesian War were already rising and swelling, he persuaded the people to send aid and succour to the Corcyraeans 433 B.C. in their war with the Corinthians, and so to attach to themselves an island with a vigorous naval power at a time when the Peloponnesians were as good as actually at war with them.
5. Plutarch, Phocion, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
archidamus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athena, parthenon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athena Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
athens Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
audience, the subjects interaction with his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
cimon Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
cognition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
comedy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
community, the subject and his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
contrasts, as theme in plutarchs narrative Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
contrasts Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
criticism, and counter-suggestibility Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
criticism, contemporary to the story narrated, exercised by onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
demades Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demagoguery, demagogues Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
demetrius poliorcetes Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
demosthenes, orator Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
emotions Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
envy Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
explanations Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
generals Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
historiography Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
ion of chios Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
kosmopolites, cultural Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
moral turnaround Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
peloponnesian war Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
pericles, and the hostile public mind Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
philip ii Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
phocion Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
plato, platonic Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
politician Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
politics, the subjects preoccupation with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
politics Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
ship, as metaphor Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
sicilians/sicily Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
social/society, dialogue of individual with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
social/society, plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
social/society, plutarchs reconstruction of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
social/society Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
space Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
sparta(ns) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
stesimbrotus, of thasos Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115
tyranny/tyrants Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
understand(ing) (as part of the process of moral evaluation)' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
verbal Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 115