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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9595
Plutarch, Pericles, 14


nanThucydides and his party kept denouncing Pericles for playing fast and loose with the public moneys and annihilating the revenues. Pericles therefore asked the people in assembly whether they thought he had expended too much, and on their declaring that it was altogether too much, Well then, said he, let it not have been spent on your account, but mine, and I will make the inscriptions of dedication in my own name.,When Pericles had said this, whether it was that they admired his magnanimity or vied with his ambition to get the glory of his works, they cried out with a loud voice and bade him take freely from the public funds for his outlays, and to spare naught whatsoever. And finally he ventured to undergo with Thucydides the contest of the ostracism, wherein he secured his rival’s banishment, 442. B.C. and the dissolution of the faction which had been arrayed against him.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.54 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.54. When the divine answers had been brought back and Croesus learned of them, he was very pleased with the oracles. So, altogether expecting that he would destroy the kingdom of Cyrus, he sent once again to Pytho and endowed the Delphians, whose number he had learned, with two gold staters apiece. ,The Delphians, in return, gave Croesus and all Lydians the right of first consulting the oracle, exemption from all charges, the chief seats at festivals, and perpetual right of Delphian citizenship to whoever should wish it.
2. Isocrates, Orations, 7.33-7.34, 16.35, 18.61 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

472a. for getting at the truth; since occasionally a man may actually be crushed by the number and reputation of the false witnesses brought against him. And so now you will find almost everybody, Athenians and foreigners, in agreement with you on the points you state, if you like to bring forward witnesses against the truth of what I say: if you like, there is Nicias, son of Niceratus, with his brothers, whose tripods are standing in a row in the Dionysium; or else Aristocrates, son of Scellias, whose goodly offering again is well known at Delphi ;
4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.140.4-1.140.5, 2.65, 4.28, 4.65, 6.16.1-6.16.3, 7.48, 7.76-7.77, 7.77.2, 7.86.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.140.4. I hope that you will none of you think that we shall be going to war for a trifle if we refuse to revoke the Megara decree, which appears in front of their complaints, and the revocation of which is to save us from war, or let any feeling of self-reproach linger in your minds, as if you went to war for slight cause. 1.140.5. Why, this trifle contains the whole seal and trial of your resolution. If you give way, you will instantly have to meet some greater demand, as having been frightened into obedience in the first instance; while a firm refusal will make them clearly understand that they must treat you more as equals. 6.16.1. ‘Athenians, I have a better right to command than others—I must begin with this as Nicias has attacked me—and at the same time I believe myself to be worthy of it. The things for which I am abused, bring fame to my ancestors and to myself, and to the country profit besides. 6.16.2. The Hellenes, after expecting to see our city ruined by the war, concluded it to be even greater than it really is, by reason of the magnificence with which I represented it at the Olympic games, when I sent into the lists seven chariots, a number never before entered by any private person, and won the first prize, and was second and fourth, and took care to have everything else in a style worthy of my victory. Custom regards such displays as honourable, and they cannot be made without leaving behind them an impression of power. 6.16.3. Again, any splendour that I may have exhibited at home in providing choruses or otherwise, is naturally envied by my fellow-citizens, but in the eyes of foreigners has an air of strength as in the other instance. And this is no useless folly, when a man at his own private cost benefits not himself only, but his city: 7.77.2. I myself who am not superior to any of you in strength—indeed you see how I am in my sickness—and who in the gifts of fortune am, I think, whether in private life or otherwise, the equal of any, am now exposed to the same danger as the meanest among you; and yet my life has been one of much devotion towards the gods, and of much justice and without offence towards men. 7.86.5. This or the like was the cause of the death of a man who, of all the Hellenes in my time, least deserved such a fate, seeing that the whole course of his life had been regulated with strict attention to virtue.
5. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 27.3-27.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Demosthenes, Orations, 22.76 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Hyperides, Pro Euxenippo, 12 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 14.8, 16.3, 17.1-17.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.3. And indeed, his voluntary contributions of money, his support of public exhibitions, his unsurpassed munificence towards the city, the glory of his ancestry, the power of his eloquence, the comeliness and vigor of his person, together with his experience and prowess in war, made the Athenians lenient and tolerant towards everything else; they were forever giving the mildest of names to his transgressions, calling them the product of youthful spirits and ambition. 17.1. On Sicily the Athenians had cast longing eyes even while Pericles was living; and after his death they actually tried to lay hands upon it. The lesser expeditions which they sent thither from time to time, ostensibly for the aid and comfort of their allies on the island who were being wronged by the Syracusans, they regarded merely as stepping stones to the greater expedition of conquest. 17.2. But the man who finally fanned this desire of theirs into flame, and persuaded them not to attempt the island any more in part and little by little, but to sail thither with a great armament and subdue it utterly, was Alcibiades; he persuaded the people to have great hopes, and he himself had greater aspirations still. Such were his hopes that he regarded Sicily as a mere beginning, and not, like the rest, as an end of the expedition. 17.3. So while Nicias was trying to divert the people from the capture of Syracuse as an undertaking too difficult for them, Alcibiades was dreaming of Carthage and Libya, and, after winning these, of at once encompassing Italy and Peloponnesus. He almost regarded Sicily as the ways and means provided for his greater war. The young men were at once carried away on the wings of such hopes, and their elders kept recounting in their ears many wonderful things about the projected expedition. Many were they who sat in the palaestras and lounging-places mapping out in the sand the shape of Sicily and the position of Libya and Carthage. Cf. Plut. Nic. 12.1-2 . 17.4. Socrates the philosopher, however, and Meton the astrologer, are said to have had no hopes that any good would come to the city from this expedition; Socrates, as it is likely, because he got an inkling of the future from the divine guide who was his familiar. Meton—whether his fear of the future arose from mere calculation or from his use of some sort of divination—feigned madness, and seizing a blazing torch, was like to have set fire to his own house.
9. Plutarch, Aristides, 25.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Cimon, 10.3-10.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Plutarch, Comparison of Fabius With Pericles, 1.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Nicias, 26.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Pericles, 3.5, 7.1, 7.3, 9.1-9.2, 11.2, 11.4, 12.1-12.2, 13.3, 13.11, 13.16, 15.1-15.2, 16.1, 20.4, 21.1, 22.1, 27.2, 31.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.1. Thucydides describes In the encomium on Pericles, Thuc. 2.65.9 . the administration of Pericles as rather aristocratic,— in name a democracy, but in fact a government by the greatest citizen. But many others say that the people was first led on by him into allotments of public lands, festival-grants, and distributions of fees for public services, thereby falling into bad habits, and becoming luxurious and wanton under the influence of his public measures, instead of frugal and self-sufficing. Let us therefore examine in detail the reason for this change in him. The discussion of this change in Pericles from the methods of a demagogue to the leadership described by Thucydides, continues through chapter 15. 9.2. In the beginning, as has been said, pitted as he was against the reputation of Cimon, he tried to ingratiate himself with the people. And since he was the inferior in wealth and property, by means of which Cimon would win over the poor,—furnishing a dinner every day to any Athenian who wanted it, bestowing raiment on the elderly men, and removing the fences from his estates that whosoever wished might pluck the fruit,—Pericles, outdone in popular arts of this sort, had recourse to the distribution of the people’s own wealth. This was on the advice of Damonides, of the deme Oa, as Aristotle has stated. Aristot. Const. Ath. 27.4 . 11.2. He, being less of a warrior than Cimon, and more of a forensic speaker and statesman, by keeping watch and ward in the city, and by wrestling bouts with Pericles on the bema, soon brought the administration into even poise. He would not suffer the party of the Good and True, as they called themselves, to be scattered up and down and blended with the populace, as heretofore, the weight of their character being thus obscured by numbers, but by culling them out and assembling them into one body, he made their collective influence, thus become weighty, as it were a counterpoise in the balance. 11.4. At this time, therefore, particularly, Pericles gave the reins to the people, and made his policy one of pleasing them, ever devising some sort of a pageant in the town for the masses, or a feast, or a procession, amusing them like children with not uncouth delights, An iambic trimeter from an unknown source. and sending out sixty triremes annually, on which large numbers of the citizens sailed about for eight months under pay, practising at the same time and acquiring the art of seamanship. 12.2. and that seemliest of all excuses which it had to urge against its accusers, to wit, that out of fear of the Barbarians it took the public funds from that sacred isle and was now guarding them in a stronghold, of this Pericles has robbed it. And surely Hellas is insulted with a dire insult and manifestly subjected to tyranny when she sees that, with her own enforced contributions for the war, we are gilding and bedizening our city, which, for all the world like a wanton woman, adds to her wardrobe precious stones and costly statues and temples worth their millions. 13.3. For this reason are the works of Pericles all the more to be wondered at; they were created in a short time for all time. Each one of them, in its beauty, was even then and at once antique; but in the freshness of its vigor it is, even to the present day, recent and newly wrought. Such is the bloom of perpetual newness, as it were, upon these works of his, which makes them ever to look untouched by time, as though the unfaltering breath of an ageless spirit had been infused into them. 13.11. And why should any one be astonished that men of wanton life lose no occasion for offering up sacrifices, as it were, of contumelious abuse of their superiors, to the evil deity of popular envy, when even Stesimbrotus of Thasos has ventured to make public charge against Pericles of a dreadful and fabulous impiety with his son’s wife? 15.1. Thus, then, seeing that political differences were entirely remitted and the city had become a smooth surface, as it were, and altogether united, he brought under his own control Athens and all the issues dependent on the Athenians,—tributes, armies, triremes, the islands, the sea, the vast power derived from Hellenes, vast also from Barbarians, and a supremacy that was securely hedged about with subject nations, royal friendships, and dynastic alliances. 15.2. But then he was no longer the same man as before, nor alike submissive to the people and ready to yield and give in to the desires of the multitude as a steersman to the breezes. Nay rather, forsaking his former lax and sometimes rather effeminate management of the people, as it were a flowery and soft melody, he struck the high and clear note of an aristocratic and kingly statesmanship, and employing it for the best interests of all in a direct and undeviating fashion 16.1. of his power there can be no doubt, since Thucydides gives so clear an exposition of it, and the comic poets unwittingly reveal it even in their malicious gibes, calling him and his associates new Peisistratidae, and urging him to take solemn oath not to make himself a tyrant, on the plea, forsooth, that his preeminence was incommensurate with a democracy and too oppressive. 21.1. But Pericles was ever trying to restrain this extravagance of theirs, to lop off their expansive meddlesomeness, and to divert the greatest part of their forces to the guarding and securing of what they had already won. He considered it a great achievement to hold the Lacedaemonians in check, and set himself in opposition to these in every way, as he showed, above all other things, by what he did in the Sacred War. About 448 B.C. 22.1. That he was right in seeking to confine the power of the Athenians within lesser Greece, was amply proved by what came to pass. To begin with, the Euboeans revolted, 446. B.C. and he crossed over to the island with a hostile force. Then straightway word was brought to him that the Megarians had gone over to the enemy, and that an army of the enemy was on the confines of Attica under the leadership of Pleistoanax, the king of the Lacedaemonians. 27.2. And since it was a hard task for him to restrain the Athenians in their impatience of delay and eagerness to fight, he separated his whole force into eight divisions, had them draw lots, and allowed the division which got the white bean to feast and take their ease, while the others did the fighting. And this is the reason, as they say, why those who have had a gay and festive time call it a white day, —from the white bean. 31.1. Well, then, whatever the original ground for enacting the decree,—and it is no easy matter to determine this,—the fact that it was not rescinded all men alike lay to the charge of Pericles. Only, some say that he persisted in his refusal in a lofty spirit and with a clear perception of the best interests of the city, regarding the injunction laid upon it as a test of its submissiveness, and its compliance as a confession of weakness; while others hold that it was rather with a sort of arrogance and love of strife, as well as for the display of his power, that he scornfully defied the Lacedaemonians.
14. Plutarch, Solon, 23.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23.3. In the valuations of sacrificial offerings, at any rate, a sheep and a bushel of grain are reckoned at a drachma; the victor in the Isthmian games was to be paid a hundred drachmas, and the Olympic victor five hundred; the man who brought in a wolf, was given five drachmas, and for a wolf’s whelp, one; the former sum, according to Demetrius the Phalerian, was the price of an ox, the latter that of a sheep. For although the prices which Solon fixes in his sixteenth table are for choice victims, and naturally many times as great as those for ordinary ones, still, even these are low in comparison with present prices.
15. Epigraphy, Demos Rhamnountos Ii, 180

16. Epigraphy, Epigr. Tou Oropou, 297

17. Epigraphy, I.Eleusis, 177

18. Epigraphy, Ig I , 84, 49

19. Epigraphy, Ig I , 84, 49

20. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1443, 1672, 1425

21. Epigraphy, Seg, 52.48

22. Epigraphy, Syll. , 4

23. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 882



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, athenian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
acropolis, building programme Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87
acropolis, of athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
agōn, agōnes, agonistic Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
alcibiades, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
alcibiades Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126, 127; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
altars Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
amphiaraos Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87
anecdote Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
antonius, marcus (mark antony) Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
apollo, cult of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
apollo Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
artemis, brauronia Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
asia, greeks (ionians) of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
asty/ἄστυ\u200e Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
athena, polias Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
athena Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
athenians, and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athenians, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114, 126, 127
athens, its resources in the fifth century bc Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
athens Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
athens and athenians, attitudes of, toward asiatics Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
athens and athenians, cults and cult places of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
athens and athenians, in pentecontaetia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
athletes, honored in archaic poleis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
audience, the subjects interaction with his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
benefactors, citizens as Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 144
building programme Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114, 126
callias, son of hipponicus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
ceramicus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
ceremony, ceremonial, sacred Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
characterisation, of the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
choregia Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
cimon Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 144
cleon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
closure (endings of biographies) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
cognition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
community, the subject and his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
contrasts, as theme in plutarchs narrative Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
contrasts Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
corcyra Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
criticism, and counter-suggestibility Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
criticism, contemporary to the story narrated, exercised by onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
debate Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
dedications, repair and remaking of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
dedications, to athena polias Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
dedications, to demeter and kore Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
dedications, to dioscouroi Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
dedications Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
delos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286; Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87
demagoguery, demagogues Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
demeter Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
demos, and elite in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
demos, and gifts in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
ecclesia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
eleusis, festival Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
eleusis Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
elite, changes and continuities in the evolution of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
emotions Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
envy Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
epistatai, mysteries Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
euergetês, euergetai, in the archaic polis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
explanations Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
feelings Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
festival, eleusinia, athenian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
festival, panathenaea Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
fortune Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
gate Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
generals Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
geographical, geography Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
gift-exchange, non-institutional/informal Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gifts, and dependence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gifts, and power Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
god(dess) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
guarantors Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
hellenotamiai Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
hieromnemones, ἱερόν/ὅσιον Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87, 301
historiography Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
history Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
hypereides, in defence of euxenippos Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
iacchus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
isocrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
keryx Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
kore Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
kosmopolites, lacedaemonius, son of cimon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
land Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
leases, lessees Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
leases, rental Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87
liturgies, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 144
liturgies Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
megara, megarian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
metics, as lessees Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
metics, ἰσοτελεῖς Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
military commanders, honors for Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
minds, internal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
minds, the subjects engagement with others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
monuments Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
moral turnaround Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
nemesis at rhamnous Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87
nicias, and sicilian expedition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias, athenian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
nicias, compared with pericles and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias, in thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
odeum (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
panathenaic way Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
panhellenic Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
parthenon, funding of Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87, 301
parthenon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
peloponnesian war Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
pericles, and the hostile public mind Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 144; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
plato, platonic Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
plato Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
plutarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 144; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
politics, the subjects preoccupation with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
politics Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
poor, the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
prayers, by keryx Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
priest Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
procession Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126, 127
propylaea Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
psychology, psychological, ability of the subjects to be attuned to others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
psychology, psychological Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
public buildings, and pericles building program Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 144
reflection, the readers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
reflection, the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
religion Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
representation Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
retrospection (backward movement) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
rich, the, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
rich, the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
rite Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
ritual Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126, 127
sacred way / hiera hodos, athens Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
samos and samians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 286
sanctuaries, beauty of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
sanctuary Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 127
semnai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
sicilians/sicily Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
sicily Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
social/society, dialogue of individual with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
social/society, plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
social/society, plutarchs reconstruction of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89, 96
social/society Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
sparta(ns) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
speech(es) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
springhouse decree (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
sulla, σύνναοι θεοί Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87
telesterion (eleusis) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
temenos (τέμενος) Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 87, 301
temple, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
temples' Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
thucydides, son of melesias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 89
topography, topographical Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 126
trierarch Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
twelve gods Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196
tyranny/tyrants Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
tyrant Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 114
understand(ing) (as part of the process of moral evaluation) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 96
walls Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
wealth Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 144
zeus, olympios Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 301
zeus, olympios of athens Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 196