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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9588
Plutarch, Nicias, 7.4-7.5


ὁ δὲ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον ἀνεδύετο, τῷ μὴ προσδοκῆσαι τοῦτο θορυβούμενος· ἐγκελευομένων δὲ ταὐτὰ τῶν Ἀθηναίων καὶ τοῦ Νικίου καταβοῶντος, ἐξαρθεὶς καὶ ἀναφλεχθεὶς τὸ φιλότιμον ὑπεδέξατό τε τὴν στρατηγίαν, καὶ προσδιωρίσατο πλεύσας ἐντὸς ἡμερῶν εἴκοσιν ἢ κατακτενεῖν ἐκεῖ τοὺς ἄνδρας ἢ ζῶντας ἄξειν Ἀθήναζε. τοῖς δʼ Ἀθηναίοις ἐπῆλθε γελάσαι μέγα μᾶλλον ἢ πιστεῦσαι· καὶ γὰρ ἄλλως εἰώθεσαν αὐτοῦ τὴν κουφότητα καὶ μανίαν φέρειν μετὰ παιδιᾶς οὐκ ἀηδῶς. At first Cleon tried to draw back, confused by the unexpectedness of this offer; but the Athenians kept up the same cries of encouragement, and Nicias kept taunting him, until, his ambition excited and on fire, he undertook the command, and, besides, declared in so many words that within twenty days after sailing he would either slay the men on the island or bring them alive to Athens. The Athenians were moved to hearty laughter at this rather than to belief in it, for they were already in the way of treating his mad vanity as a joke, and a pleasant one too.


λέγεται γὰρ ἐκκλησίας ποτὲ οὔσης τὸν μὲν δῆμον καθήμενον ἄνω περιμένειν πολὺν χρόνον, ὀψὲ δʼ εἰσελθεῖν ἐκεῖνον ἐστεφανωμένον καὶ παρακαλεῖν ὑπερθέσθαι τὴν ἐκκλησίαν εἰς αὔριον· ἀσχολοῦμαι γάρ, ἔφη, σήμερον, ἑστιᾶν μέλλων ξένους καὶ τεθυκὼς τοῖς θεοῖς. τοὺς δʼ Ἀθηναίους γελάσαντας ἀναστῆναι καὶ διαλῦσαι τὴν ἐκκλησίαν. It is said, for instance, that once when the assembly was in session, the people sat out on the Pnyx a long while waiting for him to address them, and that late in the day he came in all garlanded for dinner and asked them to adjourn the assembly to the morrow. "I'm busy to‑day," he said, "I'm going to entertain some guests, and have already sacrificed to the gods." The Athenians burst out laughing, then rose up and dissolved the assembly. 8


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.90.2-6.90.3, 7.43.1, 7.48 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.90.2. We sailed to Sicily first to conquer, if possible, the Siceliots, and after them the Italiots also, and finally to assail the empire and city of Carthage . 6.90.3. In the event of all or most of these schemes succeeding, we were then to attack Peloponnese, bringing with us the entire force of the Hellenes lately acquired in those parts, and taking a number of barbarians into our pay, such as the Iberians and others in those countries, confessedly the most warlike known, and building numerous galleys in addition to those which we had already, timber being plentiful in Italy ; and with this fleet blockading Peloponnese from the sea and assailing it with our armies by land, taking some of the cities by storm, drawing works of circumvallation round others, we hoped without difficulty to effect its reduction, and after this to rule the whole of the Hellenic name.
2. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 17.3-17.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.3. So while Nicias was trying to divert the people from the capture of Syracuse as an undertaking too difficult for them, Alcibiades was dreaming of Carthage and Libya, and, after winning these, of at once encompassing Italy and Peloponnesus. He almost regarded Sicily as the ways and means provided for his greater war. The young men were at once carried away on the wings of such hopes, and their elders kept recounting in their ears many wonderful things about the projected expedition. Many were they who sat in the palaestras and lounging-places mapping out in the sand the shape of Sicily and the position of Libya and Carthage. Cf. Plut. Nic. 12.1-2 . 17.4. Socrates the philosopher, however, and Meton the astrologer, are said to have had no hopes that any good would come to the city from this expedition; Socrates, as it is likely, because he got an inkling of the future from the divine guide who was his familiar. Meton—whether his fear of the future arose from mere calculation or from his use of some sort of divination—feigned madness, and seizing a blazing torch, was like to have set fire to his own house.
3. Plutarch, Nicias, 2.5, 5.1, 7.5, 7.7, 10.8, 12.1-12.2, 14.4, 20.6, 20.8, 21.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Themistocles, 22.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcibiades, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
ambition/ambitious Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
athenians, and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
athenians, and nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
athens Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
audience, the subjects interaction with his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
author Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 245
biography Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 245
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
characterisation, of the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
cleon Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88; Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 245
cognition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
community, the subject and his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
cowardice Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
criticism, contemporary to the story narrated, exercised by onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
criticism, plutarchs Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
decisions, of the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
demosthenes Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 245
envy Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
explanations Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
minds, internal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
minds, the subjects engagement with others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
narrative, third-person Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 245
nicias, and sicilian expedition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
nicias, compared with pericles and alcibiades Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
nicias, in thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
nicias Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
peloponnesian war Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
pericles, and the hostile public mind Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
plutarch, self-praise and self-presentation Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 245
politics Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
psychology, psychological, ability of the subjects to be attuned to others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
psychology, psychological, plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
psychology, psychological Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
sicilians/sicily Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
social/society, dialogue of individual with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
social/society, plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
social/society, plutarchs reconstruction of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
social/society Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
sparta(ns) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
syracusans/syracuse Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86
thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 86, 88
understand(ing) (as part of the process of moral evaluation) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88
wealth' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 88