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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9580
Plutarch, Lycurgus, 15


nanMoreover, there were incentives to marriage in these things,—I mean such things as the appearance of the maidens without much clothing in processions and athletic contests where young men were looking on, for these were drawn on by necessity, not geometrical, but the sort of necessity which lovers know, as Plato says. Republic, p. 458 d. Nor was this all; Lycurgus also put a kind of public stigma upon confirmed bachelors. They were excluded from the sight of the young men and maidens at their exercises, and in winter the magistrates ordered them to march round the market-place in their tunics only,,and as they marched, they sang a certain song about themselves, and its burden was that they were justly punished for disobeying the laws. Besides this, they were deprived of the honour and gracious attentions which the young men habitually paid to their elders. Therefore there was no one to find fault with what was said to Dercyllidas, reputable general though he was. As he entered a company, namely, one of the younger men would not offer him his seat, but said: Indeed, thou hast begotten no son who will one day give his seat to me.,For their marriages the women were carried off by force, not when they were small and unfit for wedlock, but when they were in full bloom and wholly ripe. After the woman was thus carried off the bride’s-maid, so called, took her in charge, cut her hair off close to the head, put a man’s cloak and sandals on her, and laid her down on a pallet, on the floor, alone, in the dark. Then the bride-groom, not flown with wine nor enfeebled by excesses, but composed and sober, after supping at his public mess-table as usual, slipped stealthily into the room where the bride lay, loosed her virgin’s zone, and bore her in his arms to the marriage-bed.,Then, after spending a short time with his bride, he went away composedly to his usual quarters, there to sleep with the other young men. And so he continued to do from that time on, spending his days with his comrades, and sleeping with them at night, but visiting his bride by stealth and with every precaution, full of dread and fear lest any of her household should be aware of his visits, his bride also contriving and conspiring with him that they might have stolen interviews as occasion offered.,And this they did not for a short time only, but long enough for some of them to become fathers before they had looked upon their own wives by daylight. Such interviews not only brought into exercise self-restraint and moderation, but united husbands and wives when their bodies were full of creative energy and their affections new and fresh, not when they were sated and dulled by unrestricted intercourse; and there was always left behind in their hearts some residual spark of mutual longing and delight.,After giving marriage such traits of reserve and decorum, he none the less freed men from the empty and womanish passion of jealous possession, by making it honourable for them, while keeping the marriage relation free from all wanton irregularities, to share with other worthy men in the begetting of children, laughing to scorn those who regard such common privileges as intolerable, and resort to murder and war rather than grant them.,For example, an elderly man with a young wife, if he looked with favour and esteem on some fair and noble young man, might introduce him to her, and adopt her offspring by such a noble father as his own. And again, a worthy man who admired some woman for the fine children that she bore her husband and the modesty of her behaviour as a wife, might enjoy her favours, if her husband would consent, thus planting, as it were, in a soil of beautiful fruitage, and begetting for himself noble sons, who would have the blood of noble men in their veins.,For in the first place, Lycurgus did not regard sons as the peculiar property of their fathers, but rather as the common property of the state, and therefore would not have his citizens spring from random parentage, but from the best there was. In the second place, he saw much folly and vanity in what other peoples enacted for the regulation of these matters; in the breeding of dogs and horses they insist on having the best sires which money or favour can secure, but they keep their wives under lock and key, demanding that they have children by none but themselves, even though they be foolish, or infirm, or diseased;,as though children of bad stock did not show their badness to those first who possessed and reared them, and children of good stock, contrariwise, their goodness. The freedom which thus prevailed at that time in marriage relations was aimed at physical and political well-being, and was far removed from the licentiousness which was afterwards attributed to their women, so much so that adultery was wholly unknown among them.,And a saying is reported of one Geradas, The name is Geradatas in Morals, p. 228 c (Apophtheg. Lacon, 20). a Spartan of very ancient type, who, on being asked by a stranger what the punishment for adulterers was among them, answered: Stranger, there is no adulterer among us. Suppose, then, replied the stranger, there should be one. A bull, said Geradas, would be his forfeit, a bull so large that it could stretch over Mount Taÿgetus and drink from the river Eurotas. Then the stranger was astonished and said: But how could there be a bull so large? To which Geradas replied, with a smile: But how could there be an adulterer in Sparta? Such, then, are the accounts we find of their marriages.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Solon, Fragments, 27 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 81 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

81. κἂν ταῦρον ἄγχοις. μάλα γ' οἰῶ ναὶ τὼ σιώ:
3. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1084, 1083 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1083. τί δ' ἢν ῥαφανιδωθῇ πιθόμενός σοι τέφρᾳ τε τιλθῇ
4. Euripides, Andromache, 596-601, 595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

595. πασῶν κακίστην. οὐδ' ἂν εἰ βούλοιτό τις
5. Lysias, Orations, 1.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

258b. document. Does it seem to you that a thing of that sort is anything else than a written speech? Phaedrus. No, certainly not. Socrates. Then if this speech is approved, the writer leaves the theater in great delight; but if it is not recorded and he is not granted the privilege of speech-writing and is not considered worthy to be an author, he is grieved, and his friends with him. Phaedrus. Decidedly. Socrates. Evidently not because they despise the profession, but because they admire it. Phaedrus. To be sure.
7. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

325c. if not instructed and cultivated in virtue—and not merely death, but confiscation of property and practically the entire subversion of their house—here they do not have them taught or take the utmost care of them? So at any rate we must conclude, Socrates.
8. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Xenophon, On Household Management, 7.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.5. Why, what knowledge could she have had, Socrates , when I took her for my wife? She was not yet fifteen years old when she came to me, and up to that time she had lived in leading-strings, seeing, hearing and saying as little as possible.
10. Xenophon, Constitution of The Spartans, 1, 1.4, 2.1-4.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Demosthenes, Orations, 59 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Cimon, 2.3-2.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Plutarch, Lycurgus, 25.3, 25.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25.3. In a word, he trained his fellow-citizens to have neither the wish nor the ability to live for themselves; but like bees they were to make themselves always integral parts of the whole community, clustering together about their leader, almost beside themselves with enthusiasm and noble ambition, and to belong wholly to their country. This idea can be traced also in some of their utterances. 25.5. Again, Argileonis, the mother of Brasidas, when some Amphipolitans who had come to Sparta paid her a visit, asked them if Brasidas had died nobly and in a manner worthy of Sparta. Then they greatly extolled the man and said that Sparta had not such another, to which she answered: Say not so, Strangers; Brasidas was noble and brave, but Sparta has many better men than he.
15. Plutarch, Solon, 23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.13.7, 5.16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.13.7. Opposite is what is called the Knoll, with a temple of Dionysus of the Knoll, by which is a precinct of the hero who they say guided Dionysus on the way to Sparta . To this hero sacrifices are offered before they are offered to the god by the daughters of Dionysus and the daughters of Leucippus. For the other eleven ladies who are named daughters of Dionysus there is held a footrace; this custom came to Sparta from Delphi .


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, greek Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 71, 72
ages of life Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98, 176
agoge Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
alcibiades Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
architecture, sparta Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
aristotle, as supposed source for the precepts Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98
aristotle Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
aristoxenus, reliability as a source Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
beauvoir, simone de Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 238, 239, 240
burkert, w. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98
childbirth Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 70, 73
debate Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
divorce Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 71, 72
education' Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98
education Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118; Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
emperor Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
epikleros Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
femininity, athletics Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 258
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
ideal, idealism Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
law, laws Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
law, on adultery Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
law, on citizenship Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 71
lycurgus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118; Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
marriage, greek Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 70, 71, 72, 73
marriage Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
nazi appropriation of sparta Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 238
numa pompilius Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
plato, as supposed source for the precepts Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98
plato Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
rivaud, a. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98
rome Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
rousseau, jean-jacques Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 238
sparta, female athletics Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 258
sparta, marriage Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 70, 71, 72, 73
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
sparta Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 238, 239, 240; Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 176; Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
synkrisis Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 118
trajan Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 282
trouillot, m.-r. Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 240
wehrli, f., interpretation of the pythagorean precepts Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 98
xenophon Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 240