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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9573
Plutarch, Fabius, 5.5-5.6


ὁ δὲ μᾶλλον εἰς φρόνημα καὶ θράσος ἀνειμένος ἐχλεύαζε μὲν τὰς ἐπὶ τῶν ἄκρων στρατοπεδείας, ὡς καλὰ θέατρα τοῦ δικτάτορος ἀεὶ παρασκευαζομένου θεωρήσουσι πορθουμένην καὶ φλεγομένην τὴν Ἰταλίαν, ἠρώτα δὲ τοὺς φίλους τοῦ Φαβίου πότερον εἰς τὸν οὐρανὸν ἄρας ἀναφέρει τὸν στρατὸν ὡς τῆς γῆς ἀπεγνωκώς, ἢ νέφη καὶ ὁμίχλας προβαλλόμενος ἀποδιδράσκει τοὺς πολεμίους.All the more therefore did he indulge his arrogance and boldness, and scoffed at their encampments on the heights, where, as he said, the dictator was always arranging beautiful theatres for their spectacle of Italy laid waste with fire and sword. And he would ask the friends of Fabius whether he was taking his army up into heaven, having lost all hope of earth, or whether he wrapped himself in clouds and mists merely to run away from the enemy.


ταῦτα τῶν φίλων πρὸς τὸν Φάβιον ἀπαγγελλόντων καὶ τὴν ἀδοξίαν τῷ κινδύνῳ λῦσαι παραινούντων, οὕτω μέντἄν, ἔφη, δειλότερος ἢ νῦν εἶναι δοκῶ γενοίμην, εἰ σκώμματα καὶ λοιδορίας φοβηθεὶς ἐκπέσοιμι τῶν ἐμαυτοῦ λογισμῶν, καίτοι τὸ μέν ὑπὲρ πατρίδος οὐκ αἰσχρὸν δέος, ἡ δὲ πρὸς δόξαν ἀνθρώπων καὶ διαβολὰς καὶ ψόγους ἔκπληξις οὐκ ἀξίου τηλικαύτης ἀρχῆς ἀνδρός, ἀλλὰ δουλεύοντος ὧν κρατεῖν αὐτὸν καὶ δεσπόζειν κακῶς φρονούντων προσήκει.When his friends reported this to Fabius, and advised him to do away with the opprobrium by risking battle, In that case, surely, said he, I should be a greater coward than I am now held to be, if through fear of abusive jests I should abandon my fixed plans. And verily the fear which one exercises in behalf of his country is not shameful; but to be frightened from one’s course by the opinions of men, and by their slanderous censures, that marks a man unworthy of so high an office as this, who makes himself the slave of the fools over whom he is in duty bound to be lord and master.


ταῦτα τῶν φίλων πρὸς τὸν Φάβιον ἀπαγγελλόντων καὶ τὴν ἀδοξίαν τῷ κινδύνῳ λῦσαι παραινούντων, οὕτω μέντἄν, ἔφη, δειλότερος ἢ νῦν εἶναι δοκῶ γενοίμην, εἰ σκώμματα καὶ λοιδορίας φοβηθεὶς ἐκπέσοιμι τῶν ἐμαυτοῦ λογισμῶν, καίτοι τὸ μέν ὑπὲρ πατρίδος οὐκ αἰσχρὸν δέος, ἡ δὲ πρὸς δόξαν ἀνθρώπων καὶ διαβολὰς καὶ ψόγους ἔκπληξις οὐκ ἀξίου τηλικαύτης ἀρχῆς ἀνδρός, ἀλλὰ δουλεύοντος ὧν κρατεῖν αὐτὸν καὶ δεσπόζειν κακῶς φρονούντων προσήκει.When his friends reported this to Fabius, and advised him to do away with the opprobrium by risking battle, In that case, surely, said he,I should be a greater coward than I am now held to be, if through fear of abusive jests I should abandon my fixed plans. And verily the fear which one exercises in behalf of his country is not shameful; but to be frightened from one’s course by the opinions of men, and by their slanderous censures, that marks a man unworthy of so high an office as this, who makes himself the slave of the fools over whom he is in duty bound to be lord and master.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Polybius, Histories, 3.90.6, 3.92.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.90.6.  But all this much displeased his colleague Marcus, who, echoing the popular verdict, ran down Fabius to all for his craven and slow conduct of the campaign, while he himself was most eager to risk a battle. 3.92.4.  But his colleague Marcus and all the tribunes and centurions in his army, thinking they had caught Hannibal famously, urged him to make all haste to reach the plain and not allow the finest part of the country to be devastated.
2. Livy, History, 22.12.12, 22.14.5-22.14.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Plutarch, Comparison of Fabius With Pericles, 2.2, 3.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Fabius, 5.3, 5.6, 12.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.3. He, and he alone, comprehended the cleverness of his antagonist, and the style of warfare which he had adopted. He therefore made up his mind that by every possible device and constraint his foe must be induced to fight, or else the Carthaginians were undone, since they were unable to use their weapons, in which they were superior, but were slowly losing and expending to no purpose their men and moneys, in which they were inferior. He therefore resorted to every species of strategic trick and artifice, and tried them all, seeking, like a clever athlete, to get a hold upon his adversary. Now he would attack Fabius directly, now he would seek to throw his forces into confusion, and now he would try to lead him off every whither, in his desire to divorce him from his safe, defensive plans. 5.6. When his friends reported this to Fabius, and advised him to do away with the opprobrium by risking battle, In that case, surely, said he, I should be a greater coward than I am now held to be, if through fear of abusive jests I should abandon my fixed plans. And verily the fear which one exercises in behalf of his country is not shameful; but to be frightened from one’s course by the opinions of men, and by their slanderous censures, that marks a man unworthy of so high an office as this, who makes himself the slave of the fools over whom he is in duty bound to be lord and master. 5.6. When his friends reported this to Fabius, and advised him to do away with the opprobrium by risking battle, In that case, surely, said he,I should be a greater coward than I am now held to be, if through fear of abusive jests I should abandon my fixed plans. And verily the fear which one exercises in behalf of his country is not shameful; but to be frightened from one’s course by the opinions of men, and by their slanderous censures, that marks a man unworthy of so high an office as this, who makes himself the slave of the fools over whom he is in duty bound to be lord and master. 12.3. Well then, as soon as he appeared upon the scene, he routed and dispersed the Numidians who were galloping about in the plain. Then he made against those who were attacking the rear of the Romans under Minucius, and slew those whom he encountered. But the rest of them, ere they were cut off and surrounded in their own turn, as the Romans had been by them, gave way and fled.
5. Plutarch, Pericles, 15.1, 39.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.1. Thus, then, seeing that political differences were entirely remitted and the city had become a smooth surface, as it were, and altogether united, he brought under his own control Athens and all the issues dependent on the Athenians,—tributes, armies, triremes, the islands, the sea, the vast power derived from Hellenes, vast also from Barbarians, and a supremacy that was securely hedged about with subject nations, royal friendships, and dynastic alliances. 39.4. The progress of events wrought in the Athenians a swift appreciation of Pericles and a keen sense of his loss. For those who, while he lived, were oppressed by a sense of his power and felt that it kept them in obscurity, straightway on his removal made trial of other orators and popular leaders, only to be led to the confession that a character more moderate than his in its solemn dignity, and more august in its gentleness, had not been created.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aftermath of cities Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
audience, the subjects interaction with his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
auspicato, repetition of Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
closure (endings of biographies) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
cognition Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
community, the subject and his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
contrasts, as narrative technique Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
contrasts Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
criticism, and counter-suggestibility Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
criticism, contemporary to the story narrated, exercised by onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
criticism, plutarchs stance towards others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
death, and posthumous conversion of people Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
dictator Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
examples (i.e. paradigm), the subjects as Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
fabius maximus, romans criticism of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
fabius maximus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
fabius maximus rullianus, q., papirius cursor, dispute with Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
fabius maximus rullianus, q., tradition of victory Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
fabius maximus verrucosus, q., auspices, repeated/upheld by Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
fabius maximus verrucosus, q., magister equitum, conflict with Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
fabius maximus verrucosus, q., recalled to rome sacrorum causa Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
fabius pictor, q., common source for fabius maximus-minucius rufus dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
feelings Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
geganius macerinus, m., gereonium, battle of Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
hannibal barqa Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
imperium, of dictator Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
imperium, of magister equitum Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
lives, within a life Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
livy, and fabius maximus-minucius rufus dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
livy, and fabius rullianus-papirius cursor dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
magister equitum, army, command of Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
magister equitum, imperium of, made equal to dictators Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
magister equitum Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
medical imagery/language Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
metilius, m. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
minucius rufus, m., dictator, conflict with Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
minucius rufus, m., imperium made equal to dictators Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
moral turnaround Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
narrator Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
onlookers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
papirius cursor, l., fabius rullianus, dispute with Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
perception Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
pericles, and the hostile public mind Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
plebiscite Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
polybios of megalopolis, and fabius maximus-minucius rufus dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
posthumous, honour or dishonour Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
posthumous Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
punic wars, second Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
reflection, the readers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
romans, and fabius maximus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
romans Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
rome Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
sacra Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 26
self-control Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
social/society, dialogue of individual with' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
social/society, plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100
social/society, plutarchs reconstruction of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 100