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9573
Plutarch, Fabius, 13


nanXIII After the battle, Fabius despoiled all of the enemy whom he had slain, and withdrew to his camp, without indulging in a single haughty or invidious word about his colleague. And Minucius, assembling his own army, said to them: Fellow-soldiers, to avoid all mistakes in the conduct of great enterprises is beyond man’s powers; but when a mistake has once been made, to use his reverses as lessons for the future is the part of a brave and sensible man.,I therefore confess that while I have some slight cause of complaint against fortune, I have larger grounds for praising her. For what I could not learn in all the time that preceded it, I have been taught in the brief space of a single day, and I now perceive that I am not able to command others myself, but need to be under the command of another, and that I have all the while been ambitious to prevail over men of whom to be outdone were better. Now in all other matters the dictator is your leader, but in the rendering of thanks to him I myself will take the lead, and will show myself first in following his advice and doing his bidding.,After these words, he ordered the eagles to be raised and all to follow them, and led the way to the camp of Fabius. When he had entered this, he proceeded to the general’s tent, while all were lost in wonder. When Fabius came forth, Minucius had the standards planted in front of him, and addressed him with a loud voice as Father, while his soldiers greeted the soldiers of Fabius as Patrons, the name by which freedmen address those who have set them free.,When quiet prevailed, Minucius said: Dictator, you have on this day won two victories, one over Hannibal through your valour, and one over your colleague through your wisdom and kindness. By the first you saved our lives, and by the second you taught us a great lesson, vanquished as we were by our enemy to our shame, and by you to our honour and safety.,I call you by the excellent name of Father, because there is no more honourable name which I can use; and yet a father’s kindness is not so great as this kindness bestowed by you. My father did but beget me, while to you I owe not only my own salvation, but also that of all these men of mine. So saying, he embraced Fabius and kissed him, and the soldiers on both sides in like manner embraced and kissed each other, so that the camp was filled with joy and tears of rejoicing.


nanXIII After the battle, Fabius despoiled all of the enemy whom he had slain, and withdrew to his camp, without indulging in a single haughty or invidious word about his colleague. And Minucius, assembling his own army, said to them:Fellow-soldiers, to avoid all mistakes in the conduct of great enterprises is beyond man’s powers; but when a mistake has once been made, to use his reverses as lessons for the future is the part of a brave and sensible man. ,I therefore confess that while I have some slight cause of complaint against fortune, I have larger grounds for praising her. For what I could not learn in all the time that preceded it, I have been taught in the brief space of a single day, and I now perceive that I am not able to command others myself, but need to be under the command of another, and that I have all the while been ambitious to prevail over men of whom to be outdone were better. Now in all other matters the dictator is your leader, but in the rendering of thanks to him I myself will take the lead, and will show myself first in following his advice and doing his bidding.,After these words, he ordered the eagles to be raised and all to follow them, and led the way to the camp of Fabius. When he had entered this, he proceeded to the general’s tent, while all were lost in wonder. When Fabius came forth, Minucius had the standards planted in front of him, and addressed him with a loud voice as Father, while his soldiers greeted the soldiers of Fabius as Patrons, the name by which freedmen address those who have set them free. ,When quiet prevailed, Minucius said:Dictator, you have on this day won two victories, one over Hannibal through your valour, and one over your colleague through your wisdom and kindness. By the first you saved our lives, and by the second you taught us a great lesson, vanquished as we were by our enemy to our shame, and by you to our honour and safety. ,I call you by the excellent name of Father, because there is no more honourable name which I can use; and yet a father’s kindness is not so great as this kindness bestowed by you. My father did but beget me, while to you I owe not only my own salvation, but also that of all these men of mine. So saying, he embraced Fabius and kissed him, and the soldiers on both sides in like manner embraced and kissed each other, so that the camp was filled with joy and tears of rejoicing.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Cicero, On Friendship, 37 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Plutarch, Demetrius, 1.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, Fabius, 2.2, 9.4, 12.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2. But Hannibal now burst into Italy, 218 B.C. and was at first victorious in battle at the river Trebia. Then he marched through Tuscany, ravaging the country, and smote Rome with dire consternation and fear. Signs and portents occurred, some familiar to the Romans, like peals of thunder, others wholly strange and quite extraordinary. 9.4. At that time Marcus Junius the dictator was in the field, and at home it became necessary that the senate should be filled up, since many senators had perished in the battle. They therefore elected Fabius Buteo a second dictator. But he, after acting in that capacity and choosing the men to fill up the senate, at once dismissed his lictors, eluded his escort, plunged into the crowd, and straightway went up and down the forum arranging some business matter of his own and engaging in affairs like a private citizen. 12.3. Well then, as soon as he appeared upon the scene, he routed and dispersed the Numidians who were galloping about in the plain. Then he made against those who were attacking the rear of the Romans under Minucius, and slew those whom he encountered. But the rest of them, ere they were cut off and surrounded in their own turn, as the Romans had been by them, gave way and fled.
4. Plutarch, Pericles, 1.1-1.3, 2.4, 11.4, 12.3-12.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.2. Since, then, our souls are by nature possessed of great fondness for learning and fondness for seeing, it is surely reasonable to chide those who abuse this fondness on objects all unworthy either of their eyes or ears, to the neglect of those which are good and serviceable. Our outward sense, since it apprehends the objects which encounter it by virtue of their mere impact upon it, must needs, perhaps, regard everything that presents itself, be it useful or useless; 2.4. For such reasons I have decided to persevere in my writing of Lives, and so have composed this tenth book, containing the life of Pericles, and that of Fabius Maximus, who waged such lengthy war with Hannibal. The men were alike in their virtues, and more especially in their gentleness and rectitude, and by their ability to endure the follies of their peoples and of their colleagues in office, they proved of the greatest service to their countries. But whether I aim correctly at the proper mark must be decided from what I have written. 11.4. At this time, therefore, particularly, Pericles gave the reins to the people, and made his policy one of pleasing them, ever devising some sort of a pageant in the town for the masses, or a feast, or a procession, amusing them like children with not uncouth delights, An iambic trimeter from an unknown source. and sending out sixty triremes annually, on which large numbers of the citizens sailed about for eight months under pay, practising at the same time and acquiring the art of seamanship. 12.3. For his part, Pericles would instruct the people that it owed no account of their moneys to the allies provided it carried on the war for them and kept off the Barbarians; not a horse do they furnish, said he, not a ship, not a hoplite, but money simply; and this belongs, not to those who give it, but to those who take it, if only they furnish that for which they take it in pay. 12.4. And it is but meet that the city, when once she is sufficiently equipped with all that is necessary for prosecuting the war, should apply her abundance to such works as, by their completion, will bring her everlasting glory, and while in process of completion will bring that abundance into actual service, in that all sorts of activity and diversified demands arise, which rouse every art and stir every hand, and bring, as it were, the whole city under pay, so that she not only adorns, but supports herself as well from her own resources.
5. Plutarch, Timoleon, 1.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.4. At last Dionysius, in the tenth year of his exile, 346 B.C. collected mercenaries, drove out Nisaeus; who was at that time master of Syracuse, recovered the power again, and established himself as tyrant anew; he had been unaccountably deprived by a small force of the greatest tyranny that ever was, and now more unaccountably still he had become, from a lowly exile, master of those who drove him forth.
6. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 4.7.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
artist Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
athenians, and pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
athenians Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
athens Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
characterisation, of the readers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
characterisation, plutarchs self- Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
coelius antipater, l. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
cornelius cossus, a. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
cornelius scipio nasica serapio, p. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
decisions, of the subjects Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
dictator Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106, 209
fabius buteo, m. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
fabius maximus, as teacher Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
fabius maximus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
fabius maximus verrucosus, q., dictatorship, first of Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
fabius maximus verrucosus, q., flaminius, named magister equitum by Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
fabius maximus verrucosus, q., magister equitum, conflict with Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
fabius pictor, q., common source for fabius maximus-minucius rufus dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
fabius pictor, q., plutarchs fabius, source for Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
flaminius, c. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
imperium, of magister equitum Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
interregnum, in 223/2 Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
iunius pera, m. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
laelius, c. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
learning Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
livy, and fabius maximus-minucius rufus dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
magister equitum, acting as dictator Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
magister equitum, imperium of, made equal to dictators Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106, 209
minds, internal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
minucius rufus, m., dictator, considered to be Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106, 209
minucius rufus, m., hercules, altar dedicated to Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
minucius rufus, m., imperium made equal to dictators Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
pericles, as teacher of virtue Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
pericles, building programme of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
pericles Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
plutarch of khaironeia, and fabius maximus-minucius rufus dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
plutarch of khaironeia, memory, reliance on Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
plutarch of khaironeia, on flaminius as magister equitum Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
plutarch of khaironeia, sources for fabius Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
politics, the subjects preoccupation with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
polybios of megalopolis, and fabius maximus-minucius rufus dispute Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
prologue (to plutarchs book) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
quinctius capitolinus, t. Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
teachers, the subjects as' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 54
valerius antias Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 106
valerius maximus, on flaminius as magister equitum Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209
vows Konrad, The Challenge to the Auspices: Studies on Magisterial Power in the Middle Roman Republic (2022) 209