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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9613
Plutarch, Dinner Of The Seven Wise Men, 5


nanAfter the tables had been cleared away, and garlands distributed by Melissa, and we had poured libations, and the flute-girl, after playing a brief accompaniment for our libations, had withdrawn, then Ardalus, addressing Anacharsis, inquired if there were flute-girls among the Scythians. He answered on the spur of the moment, No, nor grape-vines either, When Ardalus again said, But the Scythians must have gods, he replied, Certainly, they have gods who understand the language of men; they are not like the Greeks, who, although they think they converse better than the Scythians, yet believe that the gods have more pleasure in listening to the sounds produced by bits of bone and wood. Thereupon Aesop said, I would have you know, my friend, that the modern flute-makers have given up the use of bones from fawns, and use bones from asses, asserting that the latter have a better sound. This fact underlies the riddle Bergk, Poet. Lyr. Graec. ii. p. 440, Cleobulina, No. 3. The restoration of Bernardakis here adopted is found in the editio minor. which Cleobulina made in regard to the Phrygian flute: Full on my ear with a horn-bearing shin did a dead donkey smite me. So we may well be astonished that the ass, which otherwise is most gross and unmelodious, yet provides us with a bone which is most fine and melodious. That, without question, said Neiloxenus, is the reason for the complaint which the people of Busiris make against us of Naucratis; for we are already using asses’ bones for our flutes. But for them even to hear a trumpet is a sin, because they think it sounds like the bray of an ass; and you know, of course, that an ass is treated with contumely by the Egyptians on account of Typhon. The Egyptian god Set presumably, a malignant deity, who was sometimes represented with features of an ass. Cf. for example, O. Gruppe, Griechische Mythologie und Religionsgeschichte, pp. 102 and 409. Cf. also Plutarch, Moralia, 362 F, where the present statements are slightly expanded.


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eraton Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
hesiod, theogony Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
libation paeans Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
lucian of samosata, on dancing Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
notation, music Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
paeans, libation' Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
plutarch, and group song/paean Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
plutarch, banquet of the seven sages, group paeans Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188
roman era, group song and the group paean Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 188