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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9613
Plutarch, Dinner Of The Seven Wise Men, 159c


nanand in that action we do them great wrong; forasmuch as whatsoever is transmuted and turned into another loseth the nature which it had before, and is corrupted that it may become nourishment to the others. Now the very plants have life in them, — that is clear and manifest, for we perceive they grow and spread. But to abstain from eating flesh (as they say Orpheus of old did) is more a pretence than a real avoiding of an injury proceeding from the just use of meat. One way there is, and but one way, whereby a man may avoid offence, namely by being contented with his own, not coveting what belongs to his neighbor. But if a man's circumstances be such and so hard that he cannot subsist without wronging another man, the fault is God's, not his. The case being such with some persons, I would fain learn if it be not advisable to destroy, at the same time with injustice, these instruments of injustice, the belly, stomach, and liver, which have no sense of justice or appetite to honesty


nanFor anything that is changed from what it was by nature into something else is destroyed, and it undergoes utter corruption that it may become the food of another. But to refrain entirely from eating meat, as they record of Orpheus of old, is rather a quibble than a way of avoiding wrong in regard to food. The one way of avoidance and of keeping oneself pure, from the point of view of righteousness is to become sufficient unto oneself and to need nothing from any other source. But in the case of man or beast for whom God has made his own secure existence impossible without his doing injury to another, it may be said that in the nature which God has inflicted upon him lies the source of wrong. Would it not, then, be right and fair, my friend, in order to cut out injustice, to cut out also bowels and stomach and liver, which afford us no perception or craving for anything noble


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antiphanes Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
aristophanes Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
atonement Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
bernabé, a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
blasphemy Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
casadio, g. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
discretion in speech Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
euripides Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
hieronymus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
jiménez san cristóbal, a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
judgment Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
justice Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
listeners Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
orpheus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
pinnoy, m. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
plato Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
plutarch' Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
purity/purification Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
righteousness Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
sacrifice Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 262
sarkophagía Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 262
self-sufficiency Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
solon Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
speech Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
teachers Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
the soul Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
truth Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
vegetarianism Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 262
virtue Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
wickedness Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63
wisdom Wilson, The Sentences of Sextus (2012) 63