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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9613
Plutarch, Dinner Of The Seven Wise Men, 156c


nanbut to bore holes or to make mortar; and the Muses would be implacably incensed with him that should say their business is only to make harps, pipes, and such musical instruments, not the institution and correction of manners and the government of those men's passions who are lovers of singing and masters of music. And agreeably copulation is not the work of Aphrodite, nor is drunkenness that of Dionysos; but love and friendship, affection and familiarity, which are begot and improved by the means of these. Solon terms these works divine, and he professes he loves and now prosecutes them in his declining years as vigorously as ever in his youthful days. That mutual love between man and wife is the work of Aphrodite, the greatness of the pleasure affecting their bodies mixes and melts their very souls; divers others, having little or no acquaintance before, have yet contracted a firm and lasting friendship over a glass of wine, which like fire softened and melted their tempers, and disposed them for a happy union. But in such a company, and of such men as Periander hath invited, there is no need of can and chalice, but the Muses themselves throwing a subject of discourse among you, as it were a sober cup, wherein is contained much of delight and drollery and seriousness too, do hereby provoke, nourish, and increase friendship among you


nanbut to bore timbers and mix mortar. And the Muses would most assuredly feel aggrieved, if we should regard as their task a lyre or flutes, and not the development of the characters and the soothing of the emotions of those who make use of songs and melodies. And so again the task of Aphrodite is not carnal intercourse, nor is that of Dionysus strong drink and wine, but rather the friendly feeling, the longing, the association, and the intimacy, one with one another, which they create in us through these agencies. These are what Solon calls 'tasks divine,' and these he says he loves and pursues above all else, now that he has become an old man.


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demodocus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105
epicureanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 106
euphrosyne Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 106
odysseus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 106
philophrosyne Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 106
plato, performance of dialogues Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105
plutarch, symposium Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 106
plutarch Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 106
symposia' Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105
symposia Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 106