Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9613
Plutarch, Dinner Of The Seven Wise Men, 148c


nanbut that he might not disoblige Periander or seem to overlook or despise the glory and magnificence of our host. Of the rest every one, after he had anointed and washed himself, the servants introduced into a particular room, purposely fitted and prepared for the men; they were guided thither through a porch, in which Anacharsis sat, and there was a certain young lady with him arranging his hair. This lady stepping forward to welcome Thales, he saluted her most courteously, and smiling said: Madam, make the stranger fair and pleasant, so that, being (as he is) the mildest man in the world, he may not be fearful and hideous for us to look on. When I was curious to enquire who this lady was whom Thales thus complimented, he said, Do you not yet know the wise and famous Eumetis? — for so her father calls her, though others call her after her father's name Cleobuline. Doubtless, saith Niloxenus, they call her by this name to commend her judgment and wit, and her reach into the more abstruse and recondite part of learning; for I have myself in Egypt seen and read some problems first started and discussed by her. Not so, saith Thales, for she plays with these as men do with cockal-bones, and encounters boldly all she meets, without study or premeditation; she is a person of an admirable understanding, of a politic capacious mind, of a very obliging conversation, and one that by her rhetoric and the sweetness of her temper prevails upon her father to govern his subject


nanbut so that he should not seem to show disdain or contempt for Periander's ambitious designs. As for the other guests, each one, after enjoying a rub-down or a bath, was conducted by the servants to the dining-room through the open colonnade. Anacharsis was seated in the colonnade, and in front of him stood a girl who was parting his hair with her hands. This girl ran to Thales in a most open-hearted way, whereupon he kissed her and said laughingly, "Go on and make our visitor beautiful, so that we may not find him terrifying and savage in his looks, when he is, in reality, most civilized." When Iinquired about the girl and asked who she was


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

None available

Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
athens Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 247
croesus Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 247
greekness Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 247
lucian, perspectival inversions of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 247
lucian Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 247
scythia and scythians Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 247
solon' Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 247