Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9570
Plutarch, Demosthenes, 23.2
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Aeschines, Letters, 2.80, 3.160 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Dinarchus, Or., 1.43 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Polybius, Histories, 9.36.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

9.36.5.  And in return for this you proclaimed Antigonus at public festivals in the hearing of all Greece to be your saviour and benefactor.
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 17.3.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17.3.2.  In Athens, where Demosthenes kept agitating against Macedon, the news of Philip's death was received with rejoicing, and the Athenians were not ready to concede the leading position among the Greeks to Macedon. They communicated secretly with Attalus and arranged to co‑operate with him, and they encouraged many of the cities to strike for their freedom.
5. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 9.2-9.3, 11.1-11.6, 11.8-11.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.2. He was also present at Chaeroneia and took part in the battle against the Greeks, In 338 B.C. and he is said to have been the first to break the ranks of the Sacred Band of the Thebans. And even down to our day there was shown an ancient oak by the Cephisus, called Alexander’s oak, near which at that time he pitched his tent; and the general sepulchre of the Macedonians is not far away. 9.3. In consequence of these exploits, then, as was natural, Philip was excessively fond of his son, so that he even rejoiced to hear the Macedonians call Alexander their king, but Philip their general. However, the disorders in his household, due to the fact that his marriages and amours carried into the kingdom the infection, as it were, which reigned in the women’s apartments, produced many grounds of offence and great quarrels between father and son, and these the bad temper of Olympias, who was a jealous and sullen woman, made still greater, since she spurred Alexander on. 11.1. Thus it was that at the age of twenty years Alexander received the kingdom, which was exposed to great jealousies, dire hatreds, and dangers on every hand. For the neighbouring tribes of Barbarians would not tolerate their servitude, and longed for their hereditary kingdoms; and as for Greece, although Philip had conquered her in the field, he had not had time enough to make her tame under his yoke, but had merely disturbed and changed the condition of affairs there, and then left them in a great surge and commotion, owing to the strangeness of the situation. 11.2. The Macedonian counsellors of Alexander had fears of the crisis, and thought he should give up the Greek states altogether and use no more compulsion there, and that he should call the revolting Barbarians back to their allegiance by mild measures and try to arrest the first symptoms of their revolutions; but he himself set out from opposite principles to win security and safety for his realm by boldness and a lofty spirit, assured that, were he seen to abate his dignity even but a little, all his enemies would set upon him. 11.3. Accordingly, he put a speedy stop to the disturbances and wars among the Barbarians by overrunning their territories with an army as far as to the river Danube, where he fought a great battle with Syrmus, the king of the Triballi, and defeated him; and on learning that the Thebans had revolted and that the Athenians were in sympathy with them, he immediately led his forces through the pass of Thermopylae, declaring that since Demosthenes had called him a boy while he was among the Illyrians and Triballians, and a stripling when he had reached Thessaly, he wished to show him that before the walls of Athens he was a man. 11.4. Arrived before Thebes, In September, 335 B.C. Plutarch makes no mention of a previous expedition of Alexander into Southern Greece, immediately after Philip’s death, when he received the submission of all the Greek states except Sparta, and was made commander-in-chief of the expedition against Persia, in Philip’s place. See Arrian, Anab. i. 1. and wishing to give her still a chance to repent of what she had done, he merely demanded the surrender of Phoenix and Prothytes, and proclaimed an amnesty for those who came over to his side. But the Thebans made a counter-demand that he should surrender to them Philotas and Antipater, and made a counter-proclamation that all who wished to help in setting Greece free should range themselves with them; and so Alexander set his Macedonians to the work of war. 11.5. On the part of the Thebans, then, the struggle was carried on with a spirit and valour beyond their powers, since they were arrayed against an enemy who was many times more numerous than they; but when the Macedonian garrison also, leaving the citadel of the Cadmeia, fell upon them in the rear, most of them were surrounded, and fell in the battle itself and their city was taken, plundered, and razed to the ground. This was done, in the main, because Alexander expected that the Greeks would be terrified by so great a disaster and cower down in quiet, but apart from this, he also plumed himself on gratifying the complaints of his allies; for the Phocians and Plataeans had denounced the Thebans.
6. Plutarch, Demetrius, 23.2-23.5, 24.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Demosthenes, 9.1, 14.2, 18.3, 20.1, 23.4-23.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Phocion, 17.2, 17.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Aeschines, Or., 2.80, 3.160

10. Demosthenes, Orations, 20.120-20.124



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Beneker et al. (2022), Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia, 259
alexander iii Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
alexander iii of macedon Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
alexander iii of macedon vii Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
alexander the great Beneker et al. (2022), Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia, 259
antigonus monophthalmus Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
antipater Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136; Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
arrian Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
attalus Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
autonomia Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 207
beloch,karl julius Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
chaeronea,chaeronea,battle of Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
cithaeron Beneker et al. (2022), Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia, 259
curtius rufus Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
demades Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
demosthenes,orator Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
demosthenes vii Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
dinarchus of corinth (politician) Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
diodorus of sicily Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
eleutheria,in hellenistic royal ideology Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 207
encomium Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
epaminondas Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
epikrates (legislator) Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
euthynai Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
hegemony,theban Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
hellenistic ruler cults Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 207
honors and awards,proedria Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
iphikrates Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
khabrias (athenian general) Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
konon Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
macedonia Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
macedonian royal archives Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
olynthus Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
oropos Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
pella Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
pelopidas Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
perdiccas Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
philip ii Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201; Beneker et al. (2022), Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia, 259
philotas Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
phoenix Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
pindar Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
plutarch Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 136
priest Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
prothytes Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
prytaneion Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38
slave,slavery Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 201
soteria (in greek antiquity),in hellenistic royal ideology Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 207
thebes Beneker et al. (2022), Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia, 259
thucydides' Beneker et al. (2022), Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia, 259
timotheos (general) Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 38