Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9497
Plutarch, Comparison Of Aemilius Paulus And Timoleon, 2.2
NaN


οἱ μὲν γὰρ Αἰνείου καὶ Δεξιθέας τῆς Φόρβαντος υἱὸν ὄντα νήπιον εἰς Ἰταλίαν κομισθῆναι καὶ τὸν ἀδελφὸν αὐτοῦ Ῥῶμον· ἐν δὲ τῷ ποταμῷ πλημμύραντι τῶν ἄλλων σκαφῶν διαφθαρέντων, ἐν ᾧ δʼ ἦσαν οἱ παῖδες εἰς μαλακὴν ἀποκλινθέντος ὄχθην ἀτρέμα, σωθέντας σωθέντας MSS., Coraës, Sintenis 1, and Bekker: σωθέντος . ἀπροσδοκήτως ἀπροσδοκήτως after this word, Bekker assumes a lacuna in the text. ὄνομα θεῖναι Ῥώμην.There is proof of this in the fact that the Romans in the time of Aemilius were, all alike, orderly in their lives, observant of usage, and wholesomely fearful of the laws and of their fellow citizens; whereas, of the Greek leaders and generals who took part in Sicilian affairs during the time of Timoleon, not one was free from corruption except Dion.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.65.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen.
2. Plutarch, Comparison of Aemilius Paulus And Timoleon, 2.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Plutarch, Comparison of Lucullus With Cimon, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Comparison of Lysander With Sulla, 3.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Lycurgus, 30.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30.2. While these remained in force, Sparta led the life, not of a city under a constitution, but of an individual man under training and full of wisdom. Nay rather, as the poets weave their tales of Heracles, how with his club and lion’s skin he traversed the world chastising lawless and savage tyrants, so we may say that Sparta, simply with the dispatch-staff and cloak of her envoys, kept Hellas in willing and glad obedience, put down illegal oligarchies and tyrannies in the different states, arbitrated wars, and quelled seditions, often without so much as moving a single shield, but merely sending one ambassador, whose commands all at once obeyed, just as bees, when their leader appears, swarm together and array themselves about him. Such a surplus fund of good government and justice did the city enjoy.
6. Plutarch, Numa Pompilius, 20.8-20.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20.8. For possibly there is no need of any compulsion or menace in dealing with the multitude, but when they see with their own eyes a conspicuous and shining example of virtue in the life of their ruler, they will of their own accord walk in wisdom’s ways, and unite with him in conforming themselves to a blameless and blessed life of friendship and mutual concord, attended by righteousness and temperance. Such a life is the noblest end of all government, and he is most a king who can inculcate such a life and such a disposition in his subjects. This, then, as it appears, Numa was preeminent in discerning.
7. Plutarch, Pericles, 9.1-9.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.1. Thucydides describes In the encomium on Pericles, Thuc. 2.65.9 . the administration of Pericles as rather aristocratic,— in name a democracy, but in fact a government by the greatest citizen. But many others say that the people was first led on by him into allotments of public lands, festival-grants, and distributions of fees for public services, thereby falling into bad habits, and becoming luxurious and wanton under the influence of his public measures, instead of frugal and self-sufficing. Let us therefore examine in detail the reason for this change in him. The discussion of this change in Pericles from the methods of a demagogue to the leadership described by Thucydides, continues through chapter 15. 9.2. In the beginning, as has been said, pitted as he was against the reputation of Cimon, he tried to ingratiate himself with the people. And since he was the inferior in wealth and property, by means of which Cimon would win over the poor,—furnishing a dinner every day to any Athenian who wanted it, bestowing raiment on the elderly men, and removing the fences from his estates that whosoever wished might pluck the fruit,—Pericles, outdone in popular arts of this sort, had recourse to the distribution of the people’s own wealth. This was on the advice of Damonides, of the deme Oa, as Aristotle has stated. Aristot. Const. Ath. 27.4 .
8. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agesilaus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
anonymous interlocutors Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
areopagus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
brutus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
cato, elder Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
cicero Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
cimon, compared with lucullus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
cimon Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
citizen Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 277
control, political Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
darius Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
democracy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276, 277
diffidence (of plutarch), in the synkriseis Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
diffidence (of plutarch) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
fortune, mis- Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
fortune, the subjects attitude towards Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
general statements (moral) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
ideal, idealism Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276, 277
lucian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 277
lucullus, compared with cimon Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
lucullus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
medical imagery/language Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
metaphor, metaphorical Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
monarchy Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
numa Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276, 277; Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
plato Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
politician Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276, 277
reflection, moral Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
reflection, the readers' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
romulus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 277
solon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 276
synkrisis, formal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 132
theseus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 277
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 277