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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9491
Plutarch, Camillus, 19


nanThe battle 390 B.C. took place just after the summer solstice when the moon was near the full, on the very day of a former great disaster, when three hundred men of the Fabian gens had been cut to pieces by the Tuscans. But the second defeat was so much the worse that the day on which it fell is called down to the present time dies Alliensis, from the river. Now concerning dies nefasti, or unlucky days, whether we must regard some as such, or whether Heracleitus was right in rebuking Hesiod for calling some days good and some bad, in his ignorance that the nature of every day is one and the same,—this question has been fully discussed elsewhere.,Still, even in what I am now writing, the mention of a few examples may not be amiss. To begin with, then, it was on the fifth day of the month of Hippodromius (which the Athenians call Hecatombaeon) that the Boeotians won two illustrious victories which set the Greeks free: that at Leuctra, and that at Ceressus more than two hundred years earlier, when they conquered Lattamyas and the Thessalians.,Again, on the sixth day of the month of Boedromion the Greeks defeated the Persians at Marathon, on the third day at Plataea and Mycale together, and on the twenty-sixth day at Arbela. Moreover, it was about full moon of the same month that the Athenians won their sea-fight off Naxos, under the command of Chabrias, and about the twentieth, that at Salamis, as has been set forth in my treatise On days.,Further, the month of Thargelion has clearly been a disastrous one for the Barbarians, for in that month the generals of the King were conquered by Alexander at the Granicus, and on the twenty-fourth of the month the Carthaginians were worsted by Timoleon off Sicily. On this day, too, of Thargelion, it appears that Ilium was taken, as Ephorus, Callisthenes, Damastes, and Phylarchus have stated.,Contrary-wise, the month of Metageitnion (which the Boeotians call Panemus) has not been favourable to the Greeks. On the seventh of this month they were worsted by Antipater in the battle of Crannon, and utterly undone; before this they had fought Philip unsuccessfully at Chaeroneia on that day of the month; and in the same year, and on the same day of Metageitnion, Archidamus and his army, who had crossed into Italy, were cut to pieces by the Barbarians there.,The Carthaginians also regard with fear the twenty-second of this month, because it has ever brought upon them the worst and greatest of their misfortunes. I am not unaware that, at about the time when the mysteries are celebrated, Thebes was razed to the ground for the second time by Alexander, and that afterwards the Athenians were forced to receive a Macedonian garrison on the twentieth of Boedromion, the very day on which they escort the mystic Iacchus forth in procession.,And likewise the Romans, on the self-same day, saw their army under Caepio destroyed by the Cimbri, and later, when Lucullus was their general, conquered Tigranes and the Armenians. Both King Attalus and Pompey the Great died on their own birthdays. In short, one can adduce many cases where the same times and seasons have brought opposite fortunes upon the same men.,But this day of the Allia is regarded by the Romans as one of the unluckiest, and its influence extends over two other days of each month throughout the year, since in the presence of calamity, timidity and superstition often overflow all bounds. However, this subject has been more carefully treated in my Roman Questions. Morals, pp. 269 f.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 14.117 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14.117. 1.  While the Romans were in a weakened condition because of the misfortune we have described, the Volscians went to war against them. Accordingly the Roman military tribunes enrolled soldiers, took the field with their army, and pitched camp on the Campus Martius, as it is called, two hundred stades distant from Rome.,2.  Since the Volscians lay over against them with a larger force and were assaulting the camp, the citizens in Rome, fearing for the safety of those in the encampment, appointed Marcus Furius dictator.  . . .,3.  These armed all the men of military age and marched out during the night. At day-break they caught the Volscians as they were assaulting the camp, and appearing on their rear easily put them to flight. When the troops in the camp then sallied forth, the Volscians were caught in the middle and cut down almost to a man. Thus a people that passed for powerful in former days was by this disaster reduced to the weakest among the neighbouring tribes.,4.  After the battle the dictator, on hearing that Bola was being besieged by the Aeculani, who are now called the Aequicoli, led forth his troops and slew most of the besieging army. From here he marched to the territory of Sutrium, a Roman colony, which the Tyrrhenians had forcibly occupied. Falling unexpectedly upon the Tyrrhenians, he slew many of them and recovered the city for the people of Sutrium.,5.  The Gauls on their way from Rome laid siege to the city of Veascium which was an ally of the Romans. The dictator attacked them, slew the larger number of them, and got possession of all their baggage, included in which was the gold which they had received for Rome and practically all the booty which they had gathered in the seizure of the city.,6.  Despite the accomplishment of such great deeds, envy on the part of the tribunes prevented his celebrating a triumph. There are some, however, who state that he celebrated a triumph for his victory over the Tuscans in a chariot drawn by four white horses, for which the people two years later fined him a large sum of money. But we shall recur to this in the appropriate period of time.,7.  Those Celts who had passed into Iapygia turned back through the territory of the Romans; but soon thereafter the Cerii made a crafty attack on them by night and cut all of them to pieces in the Trausian Plain.,8.  The historian Callisthenes began his history with the peace of this year between the Greeks and Artaxerxes, the King of the Persians. His account embraced a period of thirty years in ten Books and he closed the last Book of his history with the seizure of the Temple of Delphi by Philomelus the Phocian.,9.  But for our part, since we have arrived at the peace between the Greeks and Artaxerxes, and at the threat to Rome offered by the Gauls, we shall make this the end of this Book, as we proposed at the beginning.
2. Livy, History, 5.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Plutarch, Camillus, 22, 15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Placita Philosophorum (874D-911C), 28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.12, 10.14, 10.16, 10.19.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Epigraphy, Seg, 30.82

7. Justinus, Epitome Historiarum Philippicarum, 24.4



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
areopagus Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
assembly, council Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
assembly, decrees of Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
assembly Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
augustus Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
battles, keressos 6th cent. bc( Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 140
brennus, gallic chieftan Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
calendars, boedromion Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
eleusinion (athens) Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
eleusis, mysteries Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
eleusis Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
ephebes Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
gauls, gallic sack Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
gauls Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
genos (attic), eumolpidai Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
geta Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
greece and greeks Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
hellenistic and roman myth/history, literature Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
hiera Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
iakcheion Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
iakchos Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
italy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
lattamyas Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 140
league, koinon, federation, confederacy, boiotian Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 140
m. ulpius eubiotos leuros Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103
plataia, boiotian city Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 140
plutarch Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 103; Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
rape Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
reader and audience Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
rome ara pacis, capitoline or mons tarpeius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
simylus' Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235