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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9491
Plutarch, Camillus, 15


nanThe Gauls were of the Celtic stock, and their numbers were such, as it is said, that they abandoned their own country, which was not able to sustain them all, and set out in quest of another. They were many myriads of young warriors, and they took along with them a still greater number of women and children. Some of them crossed the Rhipaean mountains, streamed off towards the northern ocean, and occupied the remotest parts of Europe;,others settled between the Pyrenees and the Alps, near the Senones and the Celtorians, and dwelt there a long time. But at last they got a taste of wine, which was then for the first time brought to them from Italy. They admired the drink so much, and were all so beside themselves with the novel pleasure which it gave, that they seized their arms, took along their families, and made off to the Alps, in quest of the land which produced such fruit, considering the rest of the world barren and wild.,The man who introduced wine to them, and was first and foremost in sharpening their appetite for Italy, is said to have been Arron, a Tuscan. He was a man of prominence, and by nature not prone to evil, but had met with the following misfortune. He was guardian of an orphan boy who was heir to the greatest wealth in the city, and of amazing beauty, Lucumo by name. This Lucumo from his youth up had lived with Arron, and when he came to man’s estate, did not leave his house, but pretended to take delight in his society.,He had however, corrupted Arron’s wife, and been corrupted by her, and for a long time kept the thing a secret. But at last the passions of both culprits increased upon them so that they could neither put away their desires nor longer hide them, wherefore the young man made open attempt to remove the woman and have her to wife. Her husband brought the case to trial, but was defeated by Lucumo, owing to the multitude of his friends and his lavish outlays of money, and forsook the city. Learning about the Gauls, he betook himself to them, and led them on their expedition into Italy.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.27.4, 14.117 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.27.4.  And a peculiar and striking practice is found among the upper Celts, in connection with the sacred precincts of the gods; as for in the temples and precincts made consecrate in their land, a great amount of gold has been deposited as a dedication to the gods, and not a native of the country ever touches it because of religious scruple, although the Celts are an exceedingly covetous people. 14.117. 1.  While the Romans were in a weakened condition because of the misfortune we have described, the Volscians went to war against them. Accordingly the Roman military tribunes enrolled soldiers, took the field with their army, and pitched camp on the Campus Martius, as it is called, two hundred stades distant from Rome.,2.  Since the Volscians lay over against them with a larger force and were assaulting the camp, the citizens in Rome, fearing for the safety of those in the encampment, appointed Marcus Furius dictator.  . . .,3.  These armed all the men of military age and marched out during the night. At day-break they caught the Volscians as they were assaulting the camp, and appearing on their rear easily put them to flight. When the troops in the camp then sallied forth, the Volscians were caught in the middle and cut down almost to a man. Thus a people that passed for powerful in former days was by this disaster reduced to the weakest among the neighbouring tribes.,4.  After the battle the dictator, on hearing that Bola was being besieged by the Aeculani, who are now called the Aequicoli, led forth his troops and slew most of the besieging army. From here he marched to the territory of Sutrium, a Roman colony, which the Tyrrhenians had forcibly occupied. Falling unexpectedly upon the Tyrrhenians, he slew many of them and recovered the city for the people of Sutrium.,5.  The Gauls on their way from Rome laid siege to the city of Veascium which was an ally of the Romans. The dictator attacked them, slew the larger number of them, and got possession of all their baggage, included in which was the gold which they had received for Rome and practically all the booty which they had gathered in the seizure of the city.,6.  Despite the accomplishment of such great deeds, envy on the part of the tribunes prevented his celebrating a triumph. There are some, however, who state that he celebrated a triumph for his victory over the Tuscans in a chariot drawn by four white horses, for which the people two years later fined him a large sum of money. But we shall recur to this in the appropriate period of time.,7.  Those Celts who had passed into Iapygia turned back through the territory of the Romans; but soon thereafter the Cerii made a crafty attack on them by night and cut all of them to pieces in the Trausian Plain.,8.  The historian Callisthenes began his history with the peace of this year between the Greeks and Artaxerxes, the King of the Persians. His account embraced a period of thirty years in ten Books and he closed the last Book of his history with the seizure of the Temple of Delphi by Philomelus the Phocian.,9.  But for our part, since we have arrived at the peace between the Greeks and Artaxerxes, and at the threat to Rome offered by the Gauls, we shall make this the end of this Book, as we proposed at the beginning.
2. Livy, History, 5.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Plutarch, Camillus, 22, 19 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.12, 10.14, 10.16, 10.19.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Justinus, Epitome Historiarum Philippicarum, 24.4



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
brennus, gallic chieftan Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
diodorus siculus, on autochthony, on the gauls Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 416
gauls, gallic sack Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
gauls, julius caesar on Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 416
gauls Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
greece and greeks Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
hellenistic and roman myth/history, literature Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
helvetii Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 416
italy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
julius caesar, on the gauls Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 416
julius caesar, on the suebi Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 416
plutarch Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
posidonius, on the cimbri, on the germans drinking habits Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 416
rape Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
reader and audience Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
rome ara pacis, capitoline or mons tarpeius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
simylus' Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 235
wine, reputed effects Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 416