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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9474
Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 15.4


ἀναβὰς δὲ εἰς Ἴλιον ἔθυσε τῇ Ἀθηνᾷ καὶ τοῖς ἥρωσιν ἔσπεισε. τὴν δὲ Ἀχιλλέως στήλην ἀλειψάμενος λίπα καὶ μετὰ τῶν ἑταίρων συναναδραμὼν γυμνὸς, ὥσπερ ἔθος ἐστίν, ἐστεφάνωσε, μακαρίσας αὐτόν ὅτι καὶ ζῶν φίλου πιστοῦ καὶ δὲ τελευτήσας μεγάλου κήρυκος ἔτυχεν.Then, going up to Ilium, he sacrificed to Athena and poured libations to the heroes. Furthermore, the gravestone of Achilles he anointed with oil, ran a race by it with his companions, naked, as is the custom, and then crowned it with garlands, pronouncing the hero happy in having, while he lived, a faithful friend, and after death, a great herald of his fame.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 12.310-12.328 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

12.310. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.311. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.312. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.313. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.314. / Glaucus, wherefore is it that we twain are held in honour above all with seats, and messes, and full cups in Lycia, and all men gaze upon us as on gods? Aye, and we possess a great demesne by the banks of Xanthus, a fair tract of orchard and of wheat-bearing plough-land. 12.315. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.316. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.317. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.318. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.319. /Therefore now it behoveth us to take our stand amid the foremost Lycians, and confront the blazing battle that many a one of the mail-clad Lycians may say:Verily no inglorious men be these that rule in Lycia, even our kings, they that eat fat sheep 12.320. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.321. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.322. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.323. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.324. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.325. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us. 12.326. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us. 12.327. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us. 12.328. /nor should I send thee into battle where men win glory; but now—for in any case fates of death beset us, fates past counting, which no mortal may escape or avoid—now let us go forward, whether we shall give glory to another, or another to us.
2. Herodotus, Histories, 5.22 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.22. Now that these descendants of Perdiccas are Greeks, as they themselves say, I myself chance to know and will prove it in the later part of my history. Furthermore, the Hellenodicae who manage the contest at Olympia determined that it is so, ,for when Alexander chose to contend and entered the lists for that purpose, the Greeks who were to run against him wanted to bar him from the race, saying that the contest should be for Greeks and not for foreigners. Alexander, however, proving himself to be an Argive, was judged to be a Greek. He accordingly competed in the furlong race and tied step for first place. This, then, is approximately what happened.
3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.18.1, 6.15.3-6.15.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.18.1. But at last a time came when the tyrants of Athens and the far older tyrannies of the rest of Hellas were, with the exception of those in Sicily, once and for all put down by Lacedaemon ; for this city, though after the settlement of the Dorians, its present inhabitants, it suffered from factions for an unparalleled length of time, still at a very early period obtained good laws, and enjoyed a freedom from tyrants which was unbroken; it has possessed the same form of government for more than four hundred years, reckoning to the end of the late war, and has thus been in a position to arrange the affairs of the other states. Not many years after the deposition of the tyrants, the battle of Marathon was fought between the Medes and the Athenians. 6.15.3. For the position he held among the citizens led him to indulge his tastes beyond what his real means would bear, both in keeping horses and in the rest of his expenditure; and this later on had not a little to do with the ruin of the Athenian state. 6.15.4. Alarmed at the greatness of his license in his own life and habits, and of the ambition which he showed in all things soever that he undertook, the mass of the people set him down as a pretender to the tyranny, and became his enemies; and although publicly his conduct of the war was as good as could be desired individually, his habits gave offence to every one, and caused them to commit affairs to other hands, and thus before long to ruin the city.
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 17.17.3-17.17.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17.17.3.  He visited the tombs of the heroes Achilles, Ajax, and the rest and honoured them with offerings and other appropriate marks of respect, and then proceeded to make an accurate count of his accompanying forces. There were found to be, of infantry, twelve thousand Macedonians, seven thousand allies, and five thousand mercenaries, all of whom were under the command of Parmenion. 17.17.4.  Odrysians, Triballians, and Illyrians accompanied him to the number of seven thousand; and of archers and the so‑called Agrianians one thousand, making up a total of thirty-two thousand foot soldiers. of cavalry there were eighteen hundred Macedonians, commanded by Philotas son of Parmenion; eighteen hundred Thessalians, commanded by Callas son of Harpalus; six hundred from the rest of Greece under the command of Erigyius; and nine hundred Thracian and Paeonian scouts with Cassander in command, making a total of forty-five hundred cavalry. These were the men who crossed with Alexander to Asia.
5. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 15.1-15.3, 15.5, 17.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.1. As to the number of his forces, those who put it at the smallest figure mention thirty thousand foot and four thousand horse; those who put it at the highest, forty-three thousand foot and five thousand horse. Not much more than thirty thousand foot, including light-armed troops and archers, and over five thousand horse ( Arrian, Anab. i. 11, 3 ). To provision these forces, Aristobulus says he had not more than seventy talents; Duris speaks of maintece for only thirty days; and Onesicritus says he owed two hundred talents besides. 15.2. But although he set out with such meagre and narrow resources, he would not set foot upon his ship until he had enquired into the circumstances of his companions and allotted to one a farm, to another a village, and to another the revenue from some hamlet or harbour. And when at last nearly all of the crown property had been expended or allotted, Perdiccas said to him: But for thyself, O king, what art thou leaving? And when the king answered, My hopes, In these, then, said Perdiccas, we also will share who make the expedition with thee. 15.3. Then he declined the possessions which had been allotted to him, and some of the other friends of Alexander did likewise. But upon those who wanted and would accept his favours Alexander bestowed them readily, and most of what he possessed in Macedonia was used up in these distributions. Such was the ardour and such the equipment with which he crossed the Hellespont. 15.5. As he was going about and viewing the sights of the city, someone asked him if he wished to see the lyre of Paris. For that lyre, said Alexander, I care very little; but I would gladly see that of Achilles, to which he used to sing the glorious deeds of brave men. See the Iliad, ix. 185-191 . 17.2. Many times he was eager to encounter Dareius and put the whole issue to hazard, and many times he would make up his mind to practice himself first, as it were, and strengthen himself by acquiring the regions along the sea with their resources, and then to go up against that monarch. Now, there is in Lycia, near the city of Xanthus, a spring, which at this time, as we are told, was of its own motion upheaved from its depths, and overflowed, and cast forth a bronze tablet bearing the prints of ancient letters, in which it was made known that the empire of the Persians would one day be destroyed by the Greeks and come to an end.
6. Plutarch, Lycurgus, 5.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.7. but now, by making the power of the senate a sort of ballast for the ship of state and putting her on a steady keel, it achieved the safest and the most orderly arrangement, since the twenty-eight senators always took the side of the kings when it was a question of curbing democracy, and, on the other hand, always strengthened the people to withstand the encroachments of tyranny. The number of the senators was fixed at twenty-eight because, according to Aristotle, two of the thirty original associates of Lycurgus abandoned the enterprise from lack of courage.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
acropolis,athenian Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
acropolis,of athens Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
alcibiades Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315, 317
alexander Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
alexander i of macedon Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
alexander iii (the great) of macedon Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
alexander iii of macedon Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315, 317
anecdote Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
apollo Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
architecture Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
argos and argives Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
aristotle Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
artefacts Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
athena,trojan Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
athens and athenians,and religious authority Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
athletes Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
cartledge,paul Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
civic art Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
contempt Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
cosmopolitan,cosmopolitanism Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
cylon Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
delos Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
delphi Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
demetrius of phalerum Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
democratic institutions Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
dialogue Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
discord Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
dispute Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
drews,robert Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
eleusis,festival Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
eleusis Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
emblem,emblematic Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
emotion,emotions,emotional Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
enargeia Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
encomium Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
epaminondas Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
festival,eleusinia,athenian Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
freedom Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
gate Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
hector Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
heracles Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
heraclids Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
herodotus,ethnic perspectives of Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
herodotus,on sovereignty Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
homer Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
india Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
institution Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
ion of chios Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
kingship,among greeks Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
kingship,divine Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
kingship,homeric Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
kingship,macedonian Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
kingship,spartan Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
kosmopolites,political Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
kudos Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
lycia and lycians Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
macedon and macedonians Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
medism,theban Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
nicias,athenian Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
olympia Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
painting,battle of mantinea Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
painting,hector and andromache Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
painting Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
pella Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
philip Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
philonikia / φιλονικία\u200e Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
phocion Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
pindar Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
plato Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317, 318
plutarch Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
poets Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
portia (porcia) Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
priest Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
procession Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
protogenes,painter Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
ptolemy i Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
religion Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
representation Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
ritual Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
rome,city Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
scaean gates Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
sculpture Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 318
space control Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
sparta and spartans,and victors Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
sparta and spartans,kingship at Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
stesimbrotus,of thasos Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
theatre Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
themistocles Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
theoria Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317, 318
tomb,of achilles Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
troy Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315, 317, 318
troy and trojans,later visitors to Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
tyranny,and victory and conquest' Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
viewer Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
war Michalopoulos et al. (2021), The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature, 250
women Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 315
xenophanes of colophon Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
xenophon Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 317
zeus,and kingship Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27
zeus Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 27