Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9474
Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 1


nanIt is the life of Alexander the king, and of Caesar, who overthrew Pompey, that I am writing in this book, and the multitude of the deeds to be treated is so great that I shall make no other preface than to entreat my readers, in case I do not tell of all the famous actions of these men, nor even speak exhaustively at all in each particular case, but in epitome for the most part, not to complain. , For it is not Histories that I am writing, but Lives; and in the most illustrious deeds there is not always a manifestation of virtue or vice, nay, a slight thing like a phrase or a jest often makes a greater revelation of character than battles where thousands fall, or the greatest armaments, or sieges of cities. , Accordingly, just as painters get the likenesses in their portraits from the face and the expression of the eyes, wherein the character shows itself, but make very little account of the other parts of the body, so I must be permitted to devote myself rather to the signs of the soul in men, and by means of these to portray the life of each, leaving to others the description of their great contests. ,This horse, at any rate, said Alexander, I could manage better than others have. And if thou shouldst not, what penalty wilt thou undergo for thy rashness? Indeed, said Alexander, I will forfeit the price of the horse. There was laughter at this, and then an agreement between father and son as to the forfeiture, and at once Alexander ran to the horse, took hold of his bridle-rein, and turned him towards the sun; for he had noticed, as it would seem, that the horse was greatly disturbed by the sight of his own shadow falling in front of him and dancing about. , And after he had calmed the horse a little in this way, and had stroked him with his hand, when he saw that he was full of spirit and courage, he quietly cast aside his mantle and with a light spring safely bestrode him. Then, with a little pressure of the reins on the bit, and without striking him or tearing his mouth, he held him in hand Amyot, le remeit gentiment . but when he saw that the horse was rid of the fear that had beset him, and was impatient for the course, he gave him his head, and at last urged him on with sterner tone and thrust of foot. , Philip and his company were speechless with anxiety at first; but when Alexander made the turn in proper fashion and came back towards them proud and exultant, all the rest broke into loud cries, but his father, as we are told, actually shed tears of joy, and when Alexander had dismounted, kissed him, saying: My son, seek thee out a kingdom equal to thyself; Macedonia has not room for thee.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Cicero, On Laws, 1.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 1.1-1.2, 69.3-69.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.2. For it is not Histories that I am writing, but Lives; and in the most illustrious deeds there is not always a manifestation of virtue or vice, nay, a slight thing like a phrase or a jest often makes a greater revelation of character than battles where thousands fall, or the greatest armaments, or sieges of cities.
3. Plutarch, Demetrius, 3.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Demosthenes, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Fabius, 16.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.6. His head and face were so profusely smeared with blood that few could recognize him; even his friends and retainers passed him by without knowing him. Only Cornelius Lentulus, a young man of the patrician order, saw who he was, and leaping from his horse, led him to Paulus and besought the consul to take him and save himself for the sake of his fellow-citizens, who now more than ever needed a brave commander.
6. Plutarch, Galba, 2.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Nicias, 1.1, 1.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

814c. it is even now possible to resemble our ancestors, but Marathon, the Eurymedon, Plataea, and all the other examples which make the common folk vainly to swell with pride and kick up their heels, should be left to the schools of the sophists. And not only should the statesman show himself and his native State blameless towards our rulers, but he should also have always a friend among the men of high station who have the greatest power as a firm bulwark, so to speak, of his administration; for the Romans themselves are most eager to promote the political interests of their friends; and it is a fine thing also, when we gain advantage from the friendship of great men, to turn it to the welfare of our community, as Polybius and Panaetius, through Scipio's goodwill towards them
9. Lucian, How To Write History, 53-54, 52 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1.2 (2nd cent. CE

1.2. FOR quite akin to theirs was the ideal which Apollonius pursued, and more divinely than Pythagoras he wooed wisdom and soared above tyrants; and he lived in times not long gone by nor quite of our own day, yet men know him not because of the true wisdom, which he practiced as sage and sanely; but one man singles out one feature for praise in him and another another; while some, because he had interviews with the wizards of Babylon and with the Brahmans of India, and with the nude ascetics of Egypt, put him down as a wizard, and spread the calumny that he was a sage of an illegitimate kind, judging of him ill. For Empedocles and Pythagoras himself and Democritus consorted with wizards and uttered many supernatural truths, yet never stooped to the black art; and Plato went to Egypt and mingled with his own discourses much of what he heard from the prophets and priests there; and though, like a painter, he laid his own colors on to their rough sketches, yet he never passed for a wizard, although envied above all mankind for his wisdom. For the circumstance that Apollonius foresaw and foreknew so many things does not in the least justify us in imputing to him this kind of wisdom; we might as well accuse Socrates of the same, because, thanks to his familiar spirit, he knew things beforehand, and we might also accuse Anaxagoras because of the many things which he foretold. And indeed who does not know the story of how Anaxagoras at Olympia in a season when least rain falls came forward wearing a fleece into the stadium, by way of predicting rain, and of how he foretold the fall of the house, — and truly, for it did fall; and of how he said that day would be turned into night, and stones would be discharged from heaven round Aegospotami, and of how his predictions were fulfilled? Now these feats are set down to the wisdom of Anaxagoras by the same people who would rob Apollonius of the credit of having predicted things by dint of wisdom, and say that he achieved these results by art of wizardry.It seems to me then that I ought not to condone or acquiesce in the general ignorance, but write a true account of the man, detailing the exact times at which he said or did this or that, as also the habits and temper of wisdom by means of which he succeeded in being considered a supernatural and divine being.And I have gathered my information partly from the many cities where he was loved, and partly from the sanctuaries whose long-neglected and decayed rites he restored, and partly from the accounts left of him by others and partly from his own letters. For he addressed these to kings, sophists, philosophers, to men of Elis, of Delphi, to Indians, and Ethiopians; and in his letters he dealt with the subjects of the gods, of customs, of moral principles, of laws, and in all these departments he corrected the errors into which men had fallen. But the more precise details which I have collected are as follows.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
address to the readers (second-person) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 31
alexander iii (the great), compared with caesar Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
alexander iii (the great) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29, 30, 31, 156
alexandria, in egypt Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
allegory / allegoresis Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 24
arnauld, jacqueline-marie-angélique Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 24
audience, plutarchs interaction with his Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29, 30, 31
author Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
authority Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
body/bodily Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 24
caecilius of cale acte Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
caesar, compared with alexander Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
caesar Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 30, 156
cassius dio Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
celsus Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29, 30, 31
characterisation, plutarchs self- Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
cicero, and rhetoric vs. action Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
cicero, compared with demosthenes Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
cicero, on history Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
cicero Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
closure (endings of biographies) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
complicity (between plutarch and readers) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
contrasts, between plutarch and other authors Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29, 30
criticism, plutarchs Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
criticism, plutarchs stance towards others Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
ctesias Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
cyrus Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
death, as closural theme Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
death Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
demosthenes (orator), compared with cicero Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
demosthenes (orator) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
divine retribution Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
first-person plurals, authorial Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 30
general statements (moral) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 31
generic/genre Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 31, 156
genre Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 24
god(dess) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
hecataeus Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
herodotus Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
historiography Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29, 31, 156
history Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 31, 156
homer Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
life of alexander Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 192
lucian, true stories Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7
narrator Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
orator(y), plutarchs interest in Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
orator(y) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
plutarch Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7; Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 192; Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
politics, plutarchs dealing with Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
polybius Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
posthumous, material Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
prologue (to plutarchs book) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29, 30, 31, 156
prooemium Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 192
readers, critical/resistant Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29, 30, 31
reflection, moral Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 31
retribution of opponents Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
rhetoric(al), of plutarch Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
rome/romans Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
self-knowledge Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
self-praise Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
sources, plutarchs use or criticism of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 30
sources Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 30
style/stylistic (interest in) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 29
style Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
supernatural Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
surprise Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
symbol Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 24
synkrisis' Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 192
synkrisis, formal Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
synkrisis, missing Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 156
thucydides Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 30; Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
timaeus Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 30
tradition Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 391
understand(ing) (as part of the process of moral evaluation) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 31
xenophon, historian Bowersock, Fiction as History: Nero to Julian (1997) 7