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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9473
Plutarch, Alcibiades, 8
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1084, 1083 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1083. τί δ' ἢν ῥαφανιδωθῇ πιθόμενός σοι τέφρᾳ τε τιλθῇ
2. Lysias, Orations, 1.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Xenophon, Constitution of The Spartans, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Demosthenes, Orations, 59.122 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Plutarch, Lycurgus, 15, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Pericles, 24.2-24.3, 24.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24.2. That she was a Milesian by birth, daughter of one Axiochus, is generally agreed; and they say that it was in emulation of Thargelia, an Ionian woman of ancient times, that she made her onslaughts upon the most influential men. This Thargelia came to be a great beauty and was endowed with grace of manners as well as clever wits. Inasmuch as she lived on terms of intimacy with numberless Greeks, and attached all her consorts to the king of Persia, she stealthily sowed the seeds of Persian sympathy in the cities of Greece by means of these lovers of hers, who were men of the greatest power and influence. 24.3. And so Aspasia, as some say, was held in high favour by Pericles because of her rare political wisdom. Socrates sometimes came to see her with his disciples, and his intimate friends brought their wives to her to hear her discourse, although she presided over a business that was any- thing but honest or even reputable, since she kept a house of young courtesans. 24.5. However, the affection which Pericles had for Aspasia seems to have been rather of an amatory sort. For his own wife was near of kin to him, and had been wedded first to Hipponicus, to whom she bore Callias, surnamed the Rich; she bore also, as the wife of Pericles, Xanthippus and Paralus. Afterwards, since their married life was not agreeable, he legally bestowed her upon another man, with her own consent, and himself took Aspasia, and loved her exceedingly.
7. Plutarch, Solon, 23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Andocides, Orations, 4

9. Andocides, Orations, 4



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, greek Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
alcibiades Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
alkibiades Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
areopagos, kerameikos cemetery Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
demeter, knidos sanctuary Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
divorce Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
epikleros Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
hipparete Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
law, on adultery Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
lucian, conversations of the hetairai Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
maietas, curses from Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
marriage, greek' Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72
neaira (dem. Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
prostitutes, male Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 333
sparta, marriage Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 72