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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9460
Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.22.2
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 9.20 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Pro Sulla, 43, 42 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

42. at quos viros! non solum summa virtute et fide, cuius generis erat erat Te π : om. cett. in senatu facultas maxima, sed etiam quos sciebam memoria, scientia scientia e, Schol. : consuetudine et add. cett. , celeritate scribendi facillime quae dicerentur persequi posse, C. Cosconium, qui tum erat praetor, M. Messalam, qui tum praeturam petebat, P. Nigidium, App. Claudium. credo esse neminem qui his hominibus hominibus TEe π : omnibus cett. ad ... referendum TEe : aut ... referendis cett. ad vere referendum aut fidem putet aut ingenium defuisse. quid deinde? quid feci? Cum scirem ita esse esse Te : om. cett. indicium relatum relatum Tea π : om. cett. in tabulas publicas ut illae tabulae privata tamen custodia more maiorum continerentur, non occultavi, non continui domi, sed statim statim hoc loco hab. Te, post describi πς, post omnibus cett. describi ab omnibus librariis, dividi passim et pervolgari atque edi populo Romano imperavi. divisi tota toti (-ae e ) Italiae codd. : corr. Madvig Italia, emisi emisi E : dimisi T π : divisi cett. in omnis provincias; eius indici ex ex (et e ) Te : e cett. quo oblata salus obl. salus Te : salus obl. cett. esset omnibus expertem esse neminem volui.
3. Ovid, Tristia, 2.247-2.248, 2.253-2.280 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Propertius, Elegies, 3.3.19-3.3.20 (1st cent. BCE

5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 65.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 2.3, 4.14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.3. To Nepos. Isaeus's reputation - and it was a great one - had preceded him to Rome, * but it was found to fall short of his merits. He has consummate oratorical power, fluency and choice of expression, and though he always speaks extempore his speeches might have been carefully written out long beforehand. He speaks in Greek, and that the purest Attic; his prefatory remarks are polished, neat and agreeable, and occasionally stately and sparkling. He asks to be supplied with a number of subjects for discussion, and allows his audience to choose which they will have and often which side they would like him to take. Then he rises to his feet, wraps his gown round him, and begins. Without losing a moment he has everything at his fingers' ends, irrespective of the subject selected. Deep thoughts come crowding into his mind and words flow to his lips. And such words - exquisitely choice! Every now and then there come flashes which show how widely he has read and how much he has written. He opens his case to the point; he states his position clearly; his arguments are incisive; his conclusions are forcible; his word-painting is magnificent. In a word, he instructs, delights, and impresses his hearers, so that you can hardly say wherein he most excels. He makes constant use of rhetorical arguments, ** his syllogisms are crisp and finished - though that is not an easy matter to attain even with a pen. He has a wonderful memory and can repeat, without missing a single word, even his extempore speeches. He has attained this facility by study and constant practice, for he does nothing else day or night Consequently, I look upon Isaeus not only as a wonderfully learned man but as one who possesses a most enviable lot, and you must be made of flint and iron if you do not burn to make his acquaintance. So if there is nothing else to draw you here, if I myself am not a sufficient attraction, do come to hear Isaeus. Have you never read of the man who lived at Gades who was so fired by the name and glory of Titus Livius that he came from the remotest corner of the world to see him, and returned the moment he had set eyes on him? It would stamp a man as an illiterate boor and a lazy idler, it would be disgraceful almost for any one not to think the journey worth the trouble when the reward is a study which is more delightful, more elegant, and has more of the humanities than any other. You will say 0
8. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 2.3, 4.14, 9.22.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.3. To Nepos. Isaeus's reputation - and it was a great one - had preceded him to Rome, * but it was found to fall short of his merits. He has consummate oratorical power, fluency and choice of expression, and though he always speaks extempore his speeches might have been carefully written out long beforehand. He speaks in Greek, and that the purest Attic; his prefatory remarks are polished, neat and agreeable, and occasionally stately and sparkling. He asks to be supplied with a number of subjects for discussion, and allows his audience to choose which they will have and often which side they would like him to take. Then he rises to his feet, wraps his gown round him, and begins. Without losing a moment he has everything at his fingers' ends, irrespective of the subject selected. Deep thoughts come crowding into his mind and words flow to his lips. And such words - exquisitely choice! Every now and then there come flashes which show how widely he has read and how much he has written. He opens his case to the point; he states his position clearly; his arguments are incisive; his conclusions are forcible; his word-painting is magnificent. In a word, he instructs, delights, and impresses his hearers, so that you can hardly say wherein he most excels. He makes constant use of rhetorical arguments, ** his syllogisms are crisp and finished - though that is not an easy matter to attain even with a pen. He has a wonderful memory and can repeat, without missing a single word, even his extempore speeches. He has attained this facility by study and constant practice, for he does nothing else day or night Consequently, I look upon Isaeus not only as a wonderfully learned man but as one who possesses a most enviable lot, and you must be made of flint and iron if you do not burn to make his acquaintance. So if there is nothing else to draw you here, if I myself am not a sufficient attraction, do come to hear Isaeus. Have you never read of the man who lived at Gades who was so fired by the name and glory of Titus Livius that he came from the remotest corner of the world to see him, and returned the moment he had set eyes on him? It would stamp a man as an illiterate boor and a lazy idler, it would be disgraceful almost for any one not to think the journey worth the trouble when the reward is a study which is more delightful, more elegant, and has more of the humanities than any other. You will say 0 4.14. To Paternus. Perhaps you are asking and looking out for a speech of mine, as you usually do, but I am sending you some wares of another sort, exotic trifles, the fruit of my playtime. You will receive with this letter some hendecasyllables of mine with which I pass my leisure hours pleasantly when driving, or in the bath, or at dinner. They contain my jests, my sportive fancies, my loves, sorrows, displeasures and wrath, described sometimes in a humble, sometimes in a lofty strain. My object has been to please different tastes by this variety of treatment, and I hope that certain pieces will be liked by everyone. Some of them will possibly strike you as being rather wanton, but a man of your scholarship will bear in mind that the very greatest and gravest authors who have handled such subjects have not only dealt with lascivious themes, but have treated them in the plainest language. I have not done that, not because I have greater austerity than they - by no means, but because I am not quite so daring. Otherwise, I am aware that Catullus has laid down the best and truest regulations governing this style of poetry in his lines You may guess from this what store I set on your critical judgment when I say that I prefer you should weigh the whole in the balance rather than pick out a few for your special praise. Yet pieces, perfect in themselves, cease to appear so the moment they are all on a dead level of perfection. Besides, a reader of judgment and acumen ought not to compare different pieces with one another, but to weigh each on its own merits and not to think one inferior to another, if it is perfect of its kind. But why say more? What more foolish than to excuse or commend mere trifles with a long preface? Still there is one thing of which I think I should advise you, and it is that I am thinking of calling these trifles "Hendecasyllables," a title which simply refers to the single metre employed. So, whether you prefer to call them epigrams, or idylls, or eclogues, or little poems, as many do, or any other name, remember that I only offer you "Hendecasyllables." I appeal to your candour to speak to me frankly about my tiny volume as you would to a third person, and this is no hard request. For if this trifling work of mind were my masterpiece, or my one solitary composition, it might perhaps seem harsh to say, "Seek out some other employment for your talent," but it is perfectly gentle and kindly criticism to say, "You have another sphere in which you show to greater advantage."Farewell.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adoption In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 194
cognatic kin In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 193, 194
descent, fictive In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 194
descent, figurative or symbolic In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 193
horace In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 193, 194
passennus paulus In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 193, 194
pliny the elder In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 194
pliny the younger In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 193, 194
propertius In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 193, 194
uncle, maternal' In the Image of the Ancestors: Narratives of Kinship in Flavian Epic (2008)" 194