Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9460
Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96.7
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

34 results
1. Anon., Didache, 14.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 45.3-45.7 (1st cent. CE

45.3.  For what we have now obtained we might have had then, and we might have employed the present opportunity toward obtaining further grants. However that may be, when I had experienced at the hands of the present Emperor a benevolence and an interest in me whose magnitude those who were there know full well, though if I speak of it now I shall greatly annoy certain persons — and possibly the statement will not even seem credible, that one who met with such esteem and intimacy and friendship should have neglected all these things and have given them scant attention, having formed a longing for the confusion and bustle here at home, to put it mildly — for all that, I did not employ that opportunity or the goodwill of the Emperor for any selfish purpose, not even to a limited degree, for example toward restoring my ruined fortunes or securing some office or emolument, but anything that it was possible to obtain I turned in your direction and I had eyes only for the welfare of the city. 45.4.  But the question whether these concessions are useful and important, or whether they have been granted, not to many other cities, but to one only, and that too, I venture to state, one of the most illustrious in all Asia, a city possessing so great a claim upon the Emperor, inasmuch as the god they worship had prophesied and foretold his leadership to him and had been the first of all openly to proclaim him master of the world — I am not speaking of anything like that. But that you desired these concessions most of all, and that there had been a long period during which you were in a state of expectancy, victims of deception, constantly bestowing extravagant honours upon those private persons who merely gave you promises — for of course none of the proconsuls ever either expected or promised these concessions — inasmuch as you went in a body far from Prusa to meet the men of whom I speak, and waited for them in other cities — this perhaps is a matter worth bearing in mind. 45.5.  And yet, seeing that only trifling, yes worthless, concessions were effected by them, the high-minded man, the man who was not the slave of envy and malice, should have said at the time, "You are crazy and deluded in clinging so tenaciously to men like that and in cultivating such low fellows in order to gain favours that are neither essential nor important, to say nothing of their being vague and of your having no assurance." But, I suspect, any of these things, no matter how it was brought to pass, was to them difficult. Yet surely the people were not equally distressed that it was this or that proconsul who had effected the concession and presented it to them instead of one of our own citizens. Besides, they had a lurking hope which cheered them regarding concessions that never came to pass. 45.6.  And yet this too I have heard from many sources, that when one of the proconsuls on a previous occasion had sent a rescript regarding the administration of our fices and the project came to naught, many ridiculed the city — I don't mean many of our neighbours, for the outrage would have been less in that case, but many of our own fellow citizens — alleging that the city was aiming at things beyond its reach and in point of folly proving in no wise superior to the sons of kings. And in saying these things they were not ashamed to be disparaging their own country and discrediting it so thoughtlessly by their words. For if they are among the foremost in it or among those held in honour, they are discrediting themselves, having been the outstanding men of a weak and ignoble city; while if they are among the outcast and lowest group, they are making their own disgrace still greater and more grievous, if they happen to occupy the lowest station in a city of the lowest grade. 45.7.  But, not to be diverted from my theme by these incidental reflections, now that these favours have been obtained in whatever way they were, and brought to Prusa, consider whether I have made myself obnoxious to any of our citizens, either privately by speaking to my own interest, or publicly by parading and casting in your teeth favours conferred, or by having given preferment to certain men of my choice; or whether, on the contrary, though no fewer than a hundred councillors were enrolled, while others had put in friends of their own and had schemed to have in the Council persons to aid them and to give their support to whatever they might wish to accomplish, I neither did anything of the kind nor discussed such a thing, in the belief that they would have sided with me rather than with somebody else had I so desired.
3. Ignatius, To The Ephesians, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.1. So then it becometh you to run in harmony with the mind of the bishop; which thing also ye do. For your honourable presbytery, which is worthy of God, is attuned to the bishop, even as its strings to a lyre. Therefore in your concord and harmonious love Jesus Christ is sung.
4. Ignatius, To The Magnesians, 9.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.1. If then those who had walked in ancient practices attained unto newness of hope, no longer observing sabbaths but fashioning their lives after the Lord's day, on which our life also arose through Him and through His death which some men deny -- a mystery whereby we attained unto belief, and for this cause we endure patiently, that we may be found disciples of Jesus Christ our only teacher --
5. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 14.7, 14.26, 16.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.7. Even things without life, giving a voice, whether pipe or harp,if they didn't give a distinction in the sounds, how would it be knownwhat is piped or harped? 14.26. What is it then, brothers? When you come together, each oneof you has a psalm, has a teaching, has a revelation, has anotherlanguage, has an interpretation. Let all things be done to build eachother up. 16.19. The assemblies of Asia greet you. Aquila and Priscilla greetyou much in the Lord, together with the assembly that is in theirhouse.
6. New Testament, Acts, 2.46, 12.12-12.17, 16.25, 16.32-16.34, 17.5-17.9, 18.7-18.10, 20.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.46. Day by day, continuing steadfastly with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread at home, they took their food with gladness and singleness of heart 12.12. Thinking about that, he came to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose surname was Mark, where many were gathered together and were praying. 12.13. When Peter knocked at the door of the gate, a maid named Rhoda came to answer. 12.14. When she recognized Peter's voice, she didn't open the gate for joy, but ran in, and reported that Peter stood before the gate. 12.15. They said to her, "You are crazy!" But she insisted that it was so. They said, "It is his angel. 12.16. But Peter continued knocking. When they had opened, they saw him, and were amazed. 12.17. But he, beckoning to them with his hand to be silent, declared to them how the Lord had brought him out of the prison. He said, "Tell these things to James, and to the brothers." He departed, and went to another place. 16.25. But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them. 16.32. They spoke the word of the Lord to him, and to all who were in his house. 16.33. He took them the same hour of the night, and washed their stripes, and was immediately baptized, he and all his household. 16.34. He brought them up into his house, and set food before them, and rejoiced greatly, with all his household, having believed in God. 17.5. But the disobedient Jews gathered some wicked men from the marketplace, and gathering a crowd, set the city in an uproar. Assaulting the house of Jason, they sought to bring them out to the people. 17.6. When they didn't find them, they dragged Jason and certain brothers before the rulers of the city, crying, "These who have turned the world upside down have come here also 17.7. whom Jason has received. These all act contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, Jesus! 17.8. The multitude and the rulers of the city were troubled when they heard these things. 17.9. When they had taken security from Jason and the rest, they let them go. 18.7. He departed there, and went into the house of a certain man named Justus, one who worshiped God, whose house was next door to the synagogue. 18.8. Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue, believed in the Lord with all his house. Many of the Corinthians, hearing, believed and were baptized. 18.9. The Lord said to Paul in the night by a vision, "Don't be afraid, but speak and don't be silent; 18.10. for I am with you, and no one will attack you to harm you, for I have many people in this city. 20.7. On the first day of the week, when the disciples were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them, intending to depart on the next day, and continued his speech until midnight.
7. New Testament, Apocalypse, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. This is the Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his servants the things which must happen soon, which he sent and made known by his angel to his servant, John
8. New Testament, James, 5.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.13. Is any among you suffering? Let him pray. Is any cheerful? Let him sing praises.
9. New Testament, Colossians, 3.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.16. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly; in all wisdom teaching and admonishing one another with psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your heart to the Lord.
10. New Testament, Ephesians, 5.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.19. speaking to one another in psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs; singing, and singing praises in your heart to the Lord;
11. New Testament, Luke, 6.12, 22.7, 23.54 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.12. It happened in these days, that he went out to the mountain to pray, and he continued all night in prayer to God. 22.7. The day of unleavened bread came, on which the Passover must be sacrificed. 23.54. It was the day of the Preparation, and the Sabbath was drawing near.
12. New Testament, Mark, 14.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.26. When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.
13. New Testament, Matthew, 26.30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26.30. When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.
14. Tacitus, Annals, 15.44 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.44.  So far, the precautions taken were suggested by human prudence: now means were sought for appeasing deity, and application was made to the Sibylline books; at the injunction of which public prayers were offered to Vulcan, Ceres, and Proserpine, while Juno was propitiated by the matrons, first in the Capitol, then at the nearest point of the sea-shore, where water was drawn for sprinkling the temple and image of the goddess. Ritual banquets and all-night vigils were celebrated by women in the married state. But neither human help, nor imperial munificence, nor all the modes of placating Heaven, could stifle scandal or dispel the belief that the fire had taken place by order. Therefore, to scotch the rumour, Nero substituted as culprits, and punished with the utmost refinements of cruelty, a class of men, loathed for their vices, whom the crowd styled Christians. Christus, the founder of the name, had undergone the death penalty in the reign of Tiberius, by sentence of the procurator Pontius Pilatus, and the pernicious superstition was checked for a moment, only to break out once more, not merely in Judaea, the home of the disease, but in the capital itself, where all things horrible or shameful in the world collect and find a vogue. First, then, the confessed members of the sect were arrested; next, on their disclosures, vast numbers were convicted, not so much on the count of arson as for hatred of the human race. And derision accompanied their end: they were covered with wild beasts' skins and torn to death by dogs; or they were fastened on crosses, and, when daylight failed were burned to serve as lamps by night. Nero had offered his Gardens for the spectacle, and gave an exhibition in his Circus, mixing with the crowd in the habit of a charioteer, or mounted on his car. Hence, in spite of a guilt which had earned the most exemplary punishment, there arose a sentiment of pity, due to the impression that they were being sacrificed not for the welfare of the state but to the ferocity of a single man.
15. Anon., Acts of Thomas, 49 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

49. And he laid his hands on them and blessed them, saying: The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ shall be upon you for ever. And they said, Amen. And the woman besought him, saying: O apostle of the Most High, give me the seal, that that enemy return not again unto me. Then he caused her to come near unto him (Syr. went to a river which was close by there), and laid his hands upon her and sealed her in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost; and many others also were sealed with her. And the apostle bade his minister (deacon) to set forth a table; and he set forth a stool which they found there, and spread a linen cloth upon it and set on the bread of blessing; and the apostle stood by it and said: Jesu, that hast accounted us worthy to partake of the eucharist of thine holy body and blood, lo, we are bold to draw near unto thine eucharist and to call upon thine holy name: come thou and communicate unto us (Syr. adds more).
16. Anon., Tchacos 3 Gospel of Judas, 38.16-38.18 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

17. Clement of Alexandria, Excerpts From Theodotus, 78.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 2.4.41 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

19. Justin, First Apology, 62-67, 61 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

61. I will also relate the manner in which we dedicated ourselves to God when we had been made new through Christ; lest, if we omit this, we seem to be unfair in the explanation we are making. As many as are persuaded and believe that what we teach and say is true, and undertake to be able to live accordingly, are instructed to pray and to entreat God with fasting, for the remission of their sins that are past, we praying and fasting with them. Then they are brought by us where there is water, and are regenerated in the same manner in which we were ourselves regenerated. For, in the name of God, the Father and Lord of the universe, and of our Saviour Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Spirit, they then receive the washing with water. For Christ also said, Unless you be born again, you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. John 3:5 Now, that it is impossible for those who have once been born to enter into their mothers' wombs, is manifest to all. And how those who have sinned and repent shall escape their sins, is declared by Esaias the prophet, as I wrote above; he thus speaks: Wash you, make you clean; put away the evil of your doings from your souls; learn to do well; judge the fatherless, and plead for the widow: and come and let us reason together, says the Lord. And though your sins be as scarlet, I will make them white like wool; and though they be as crimson, I will make them white as snow. But if you refuse and rebel, the sword shall devour you: for the mouth of the Lord has spoken it. Isaiah 1:16-20 And for this [rite] we have learned from the apostles this reason. Since at our birth we were born without our own knowledge or choice, by our parents coming together, and were brought up in bad habits and wicked training; in order that we may not remain the children of necessity and of ignorance, but may become the children of choice and knowledge, and may obtain in the water the remission of sins formerly committed, there is pronounced over him who chooses to be born again, and has repented of his sins, the name of God the Father and Lord of the universe; he who leads to the laver the person that is to be washed calling him by this name alone. For no one can utter the name of the ineffable God; and if any one dare to say that there is a name, he raves with a hopeless madness. And this washing is called illumination, because they who learn these things are illuminated in their understandings. And in the name of Jesus Christ, who was crucified under Pontius Pilate, and in the name of the Holy Ghost, who through the prophets foretold all things about Jesus, he who is illuminated is washed.
20. Lucian, The Dance, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 539, 486 (2nd cent. CE

22. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.33-10.34, 10.41, 10.61, 10.93, 10.96, 10.96.2, 10.96.4-10.96.6, 10.96.8-10.96.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.33. To Trajan. While I was visiting a distant part of the province a most desolating fire broke out at Nicomedia and destroyed a number of private houses and two public buildings, the almshouse * and temple of Isis, although a road ran between them. The fire was allowed to spread farther than it need have done, first, owing to the violence of the wind, and, secondly, to the laziness of the inhabitants, it being generally agreed that they stood idly by without moving and merely watched the catastrophe. Moreover, there is not a single public fire-engine ** or bucket in the place, and not one solitary appliance for mastering an outbreak of fire. However, these will be provided in accordance with the orders I have already given. But, Sir, I would have you consider whether you think a guild of firemen, of about 150 men, should be instituted. I will take care that no one who is not a genuine fireman should be admitted, and that the guild should not misapply the charter granted to it, and there would be no difficulty in keeping an eye on so small a body. 0 10.34. Trajan to Pliny. You have conceived the idea that a guild of firemen might be formed in Nicomedia on the model of various others already existing. But it is to be remembered that your province of Bithynia, and especially city states like Nicomedia, are the prey of factions. Whatever name we may give to those who form an association, and whatever the reason of the association may be, they will soon degenerate into secret societies. It is better policy to provide appliances for mastering conflagrations and encourage property owners to make use of them, and, if occasion demands, press the crowd which collects into the same service. 10.41. To Trajan. I consider the splendour of your position and the loftiness of your mind, it seems to me most fitting that I should point out to you schemes which would be worthy of your eternal fame and glory, and which would not only be imposing to the imagination, but of great public utility. There lies in the territory of the people of Nicomedia a most spacious lake, * by which marble, grain, timber, and bulky articles can be brought by barges to the high road with but little expense and labour, though it is a very laborious and costly business to take them down on waggons to the sea. ** [ (?) To connect the lake with the sea ] would demand a large supply of workmen, but they are to be found on the spot, for in the country districts labourers are plentiful, and they are still more plentiful in the city, while it is quite certain that all would be perfectly willing to help in an undertaking which would be of profit to everyone. It only remains for you, if you think fit, to send a surveyor or an architect to make careful observations and find out whether the lake lies at a higher level than the sea, for the engineers in this district hold that it is forty cubits higher. I find that one of the earlier kings † dug a trench over the same site, but it is doubtful whether his object was to drain off the moisture from the surrounding fields, or to join the waters of the lake and the river. For the trench was not completed, and it is not known whether the work was abandoned because of the king's death, or because the success of the enterprise was despaired of. But this only fires my desire and anxiety - you will pardon my eager ambition for your glory - that you should complete what the kings merely commenced.
23. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.33-10.34, 10.41, 10.61, 10.93, 10.96, 10.96.2, 10.96.4-10.96.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.33. To Trajan. While I was visiting a distant part of the province a most desolating fire broke out at Nicomedia and destroyed a number of private houses and two public buildings, the almshouse * and temple of Isis, although a road ran between them. The fire was allowed to spread farther than it need have done, first, owing to the violence of the wind, and, secondly, to the laziness of the inhabitants, it being generally agreed that they stood idly by without moving and merely watched the catastrophe. Moreover, there is not a single public fire-engine ** or bucket in the place, and not one solitary appliance for mastering an outbreak of fire. However, these will be provided in accordance with the orders I have already given. But, Sir, I would have you consider whether you think a guild of firemen, of about 150 men, should be instituted. I will take care that no one who is not a genuine fireman should be admitted, and that the guild should not misapply the charter granted to it, and there would be no difficulty in keeping an eye on so small a body. 0 10.34. Trajan to Pliny. You have conceived the idea that a guild of firemen might be formed in Nicomedia on the model of various others already existing. But it is to be remembered that your province of Bithynia, and especially city states like Nicomedia, are the prey of factions. Whatever name we may give to those who form an association, and whatever the reason of the association may be, they will soon degenerate into secret societies. It is better policy to provide appliances for mastering conflagrations and encourage property owners to make use of them, and, if occasion demands, press the crowd which collects into the same service. 10.41. To Trajan. I consider the splendour of your position and the loftiness of your mind, it seems to me most fitting that I should point out to you schemes which would be worthy of your eternal fame and glory, and which would not only be imposing to the imagination, but of great public utility. There lies in the territory of the people of Nicomedia a most spacious lake, * by which marble, grain, timber, and bulky articles can be brought by barges to the high road with but little expense and labour, though it is a very laborious and costly business to take them down on waggons to the sea. ** [ (?) To connect the lake with the sea ] would demand a large supply of workmen, but they are to be found on the spot, for in the country districts labourers are plentiful, and they are still more plentiful in the city, while it is quite certain that all would be perfectly willing to help in an undertaking which would be of profit to everyone. It only remains for you, if you think fit, to send a surveyor or an architect to make careful observations and find out whether the lake lies at a higher level than the sea, for the engineers in this district hold that it is forty cubits higher. I find that one of the earlier kings † dug a trench over the same site, but it is doubtful whether his object was to drain off the moisture from the surrounding fields, or to join the waters of the lake and the river. For the trench was not completed, and it is not known whether the work was abandoned because of the king's death, or because the success of the enterprise was despaired of. But this only fires my desire and anxiety - you will pardon my eager ambition for your glory - that you should complete what the kings merely commenced.
24. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 54 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Tertullian, Against The Valentinians, 1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1. The Valentinians, who are no doubt a very large body of heretics- comprising as they do so many apostates from the truth, who have a propensity for fables, and no discipline to deter them (therefrom) care for nothing so much as to obscure what they preach, if indeed they (can be said to) preach who obscure their doctrine. The officiousness with which they guard their doctrine is an officiousness which betrays their guilt. Their disgrace is proclaimed in the very earnestness with which they maintain their religious system. Now, in the case of those Eleusinian mysteries, which are the very heresy of Athenian superstition, it is their secrecy that is their disgrace. Accordingly, they previously beset all access to their body with tormenting conditions; and they require a long initiation before they enrol (their members), even instruction during five years for their perfect disciples, in order that they may mould their opinions by this suspension of full knowledge, and apparently raise the dignity of their mysteries in proportion to the craving for them which they have previously created. Then follows the duty of silence. Carefully is that guarded, which is so long in finding. All the divinity, however, lies in their secret recesses: there are revealed at last all the aspirations of the fully initiated, the entire mystery of the sealed tongue, the symbol of virility. But this allegorical representation, under the pretext of nature's reverend name, obscures a real sacrilege by help of an arbitrary symbol, and by empty images obviates the reproach of falsehood! In like manner, the heretics who are now the object of our remarks, the Valentinians, have formed Eleusinian dissipations of their own, consecrated by a profound silence, having nothing of the heavenly in them but their mystery. By the help of the sacred names and titles and arguments of true religion, they have fabricated the vainest and foulest figment for men's pliant liking, out of the affluent suggestions of Holy Scripture, since from its many springs many errors may well emanate. If you propose to them inquiries sincere and honest, they answer you with stern look and contracted brow, and say, The subject is profound. If you try them with subtle questions, with the ambiguities of their double tongue, they affirm a community of faith (with yourself). If you intimate to them that you understand their opinions, they insist on knowing nothing themselves. If you come to a close engagement with them they destroy your own fond hope of a victory over them by a self-immolation. Not even to their own disciples do they commit a secret before they have made sure of them. They have the knack of persuading men before instructing them; although truth persuades by teaching, but does not teach by first persuading.
26. Tertullian, Apology, 7.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

39. I shall at once go on, then, to exhibit the peculiarities of the Christian society, that, as I have refuted the evil charged against it, I may point out its positive good. We are a body knit together as such by a common religious profession, by unity of discipline, and by the bond of a common hope. We meet together as an assembly and congregation, that, offering up prayer to God as with united force, we may wrestle with Him in our supplications. This violence God delights in. We pray, too, for the emperors, for their ministers and for all in authority, for the welfare of the world, for the prevalence of peace, for the delay of the final consummation. We assemble to read our sacred writings, if any peculiarity of the times makes either forewarning or reminiscence needful. However it be in that respect, with the sacred words we nourish our faith, we animate our hope, we make our confidence more steadfast; and no less by inculcations of God's precepts we confirm good habits. In the same place also exhortations are made, rebukes and sacred censures are administered. For with a great gravity is the work of judging carried on among us, as befits those who feel assured that they are in the sight of God; and you have the most notable example of judgment to come when any one has sinned so grievously as to require his severance from us in prayer, in the congregation and in all sacred intercourse. The tried men of our elders preside over us, obtaining that honour not by purchase, but by established character. There is no buying and selling of any sort in the things of God. Though we have our treasure chest, it is not made up of purchase-money, as of a religion that has its price. On the monthly day, if he likes, each puts in a small donation; but only if it be his pleasure, and only if he be able: for there is no compulsion; all is voluntary. These gifts are, as it were, piety's deposit fund. For they are not taken thence and spent on feasts, and drinking-bouts, and eating-houses, but to support and bury poor people, to supply the wants of boys and girls destitute of means and parents, and of old persons confined now to the house; such, too, as have suffered shipwreck; and if there happen to be any in the mines, or banished to the islands, or shut up in the prisons, for nothing but their fidelity to the cause of God's Church, they become the nurslings of their confession. But it is mainly the deeds of a love so noble that lead many to put a brand upon us. See, they say, how they love one another, for themselves are animated by mutual hatred; how they are ready even to die for one another, for they themselves will sooner put to death. And they are angry with us, too, because we call each other brethren; for no other reason, as I think, than because among themselves names of consanguinity are assumed in mere pretence of affection. But we are your brethren as well, by the law of our common mother nature, though you are hardly men, because brothers so unkind. At the same time, how much more fittingly they are called and counted brothers who have been led to the knowledge of God as their common Father, who have drunk in one spirit of holiness, who from the same womb of a common ignorance have agonized into the same light of truth! But on this very account, perhaps, we are regarded as having less claim to be held true brothers, that no tragedy makes a noise about our brotherhood, or that the family possessions, which generally destroy brotherhood among you, create fraternal bonds among us. One in mind and soul, we do not hesitate to share our earthly goods with one another. All things are common among us but our wives. We give up our community where it is practised alone by others, who not only take possession of the wives of their friends, but most tolerantly also accommodate their friends with theirs, following the example, I believe, of those wise men of ancient times, the Greek Socrates and the Roman Cato, who shared with their friends the wives whom they had married, it seems for the sake of progeny both to themselves and to others; whether in this acting against their partners' wishes, I am not able to say. Why should they have any care over their chastity, when their husbands so readily bestowed it away? O noble example of Attic wisdom, of Roman gravity - the philosopher and the censor playing pimps! What wonder if that great love of Christians towards one another is desecrated by you! For you abuse also our humble feasts, on the ground that they are extravagant as well as infamously wicked. To us, it seems, applies the saying of Diogenes: The people of Megara feast as though they were going to die on the morrow; they build as though they were never to die! But one sees more readily the mote in another's eye than the beam in his own. Why, the very air is soured with the eructations of so many tribes, and curi, and decuri . The Salii cannot have their feast without going into debt; you must get the accountants to tell you what the tenths of Hercules and the sacrificial banquets cost; the choicest cook is appointed for the Apaturia, the Dionysia, the Attic mysteries; the smoke from the banquet of Serapis will call out the firemen. Yet about the modest supper-room of the Christians alone a great ado is made. Our feast explains itself by its name. The Greeks call it agapè, i.e., affection. Whatever it costs, our outlay in the name of piety is gain, since with the good things of the feast we benefit the needy; not as it is with you, do parasites aspire to the glory of satisfying their licentious propensities, selling themselves for a belly-feast to all disgraceful treatment - but as it is with God himself, a peculiar respect is shown to the lowly. If the object of our feast be good, in the light of that consider its further regulations. As it is an act of religious service, it permits no vileness or immodesty. The participants, before reclining, taste first of prayer to God. As much is eaten as satisfies the cravings of hunger; as much is drunk as befits the chaste. They say it is enough, as those who remember that even during the night they have to worship God; they talk as those who know that the Lord is one of their auditors. After manual ablution, and the bringing in of lights, each is asked to stand forth and sing, as he can, a hymn to God, either one from the holy Scriptures or one of his own composing - a proof of the measure of our drinking. As the feast commenced with prayer, so with prayer it is closed. We go from it, not like troops of mischief-doers, nor bands of vagabonds, nor to break out into licentious acts, but to have as much care of our modesty and chastity as if we had been at a school of virtue rather than a banquet. Give the congregation of the Christians its due, and hold it unlawful, if it is like assemblies of the illicit sort: by all means let it be condemned, if any complaint can be validly laid against it, such as lies against secret factions. But who has ever suffered harm from our assemblies? We are in our congregations just what we are when separated from each other; we are as a community what we are individuals; we injure nobody, we trouble nobody. When the upright, when the virtuous meet together, when the pious, when the pure assemble in congregation, you ought not to call that a faction, but a curia- [i.e., the court of God.]
27. Tertullian, On The Crown, 3.3-3.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

28. Cyprian, Letters, 63.15.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

29. Cyprian, Letters, 63.15.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

30. Cyprian, Letters, 63.15.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

31. Cyprian, Letters, 63.15.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

32. Origen, Against Celsus, 6.27 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.27. After the matter of the diagram, he brings forward certain monstrous statements, in the form of question and answer, regarding what is called by ecclesiastical writers the seal, statements which did not arise from imperfect information; such as that he who impresses the seal is called father, and he who is sealed is called young man and son; and who answers, I have been anointed with white ointment from the tree of life,- things which we never heard to have occurred even among the heretics. In the next place, he determines even the number mentioned by those who deliver over the seal, as that of seven angels, who attach themselves to both sides of the soul of the dying body; the one party being named angels of light, the others 'archontics;' and he asserts that the ruler of those named 'archontics' is termed the 'accursed' god. Then, laying hold of the expression, he assails, not without reason, those who venture to use such language; and on that account we entertain a similar feeling of indignation with those who censure such individuals, if indeed there exist any who call the God of the Jews- who sends rain and thunder, and who is the Creator of this world, and the God of Moses, and of the cosmogony which he records - an accursed divinity. Celsus, however, appears to have had in view in employing these expressions, not a rational object, but one of a most irrational kind, arising out of his hatred towards us, which is so unlike a philosopher. For his aim was, that those who are unacquainted with our customs should, on perusing his treatise, at once assail us as if we called the noble Creator of this world an accursed divinity. He appears to me, indeed, to have acted like those Jews who, when Christianity began to be first preached, scattered abroad false reports of the Gospel, such as that Christians offered up an infant in sacrifice, and partook of its flesh; and again, that the professors of Christianity, wishing to do the 'works of darkness,' used to extinguish the lights (in their meetings), and each one to have sexual intercourse with any woman whom he chanced to meet. These calumnies have long exercised, although unreasonably, an influence over the minds of very many, leading those who are aliens to the Gospel to believe that Christians are men of such a character; and even at the present day they mislead some, and prevent them from entering even into the simple intercourse of conversation with those who are Christians.
33. Justinian, Digest, 48.3.6.1 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

34. Epigraphy, Igr Iv, 353



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of martyrs (acta martyrum) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371
administration, activities Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371, 372
administration, infrastructure Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 372
administration, roman imperial Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371, 372
aemilius rectus, lucius Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 115
aezani Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
africa Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
agape Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 80
akeptous (female donor) Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
altars Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
amisos Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
andrew, apostle Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 90
andronicus Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 90
angels, heavenly mansion of Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
apollo of clarus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
apollo pythios Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
apostles, and liturgies Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
aramaic (language) Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
archippos, philosopher Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 372
archive Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371, 372
artemilla Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 90
asia Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
associations Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 34
athens Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
becker, e. m. Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
bithynia(ns) Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 90
bithynia/pontus Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
blessings Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
bowls Sandnes and Hvalvik, Early Christian Prayer and Identity Formation (2014) 189
bread, of blessing (εὐλογία) Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
c. claudius sostratos (laodicea) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
cantors Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
children Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
christian, community Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
christian/ity, as collegia/thiasoi Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 14
christians/christianity Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
clarus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate, inherited catechetical practices from within early church Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate, secrecy of Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
clement of alexandria Sandnes and Hvalvik, Early Christian Prayer and Identity Formation (2014) 189
codex tchacos, sacrifice Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
collegia Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
collegium Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
colophon Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
colossae Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
colossians (epistle) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
consilium of the governor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371
copies, distribution of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 115
corinth Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 90
cos Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
customs/traditions/practices as identity markers, among christians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
cyprian of carthage Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 90
deacons Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
disciples, visions of Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
domitius corbulo, cn. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
drusiana Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 90
edessa, syria Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
emperor, provinces Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
emperor cult Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
epameinondas of thebes Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
epinoia, the eucharist Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
eucharist, space Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
fabius persicus, proconsul Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371
fabius postuminus, q. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
festivals, deia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
franciscans Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
genos/gene/gens/genus, christians as Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
genos/gene/gens/genus, in suetonius Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
heaven, visions of altars and sacrifices in Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
homonoia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
house, church Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
human sacrifice Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
hymns Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139; Sandnes and Hvalvik, Early Christian Prayer and Identity Formation (2014) 189
in the morning Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 42, 80
ius gladii (right of the sword) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371
judea Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
justin martyr, on catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
kafr kanna, church Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
kithara Sandnes and Hvalvik, Early Christian Prayer and Identity Formation (2014) 189
lake sapanca Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 372
lang, t. j. Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
latin language in asia minor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371
law, public Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
legatus augusti propraetore Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
lesbos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
linen Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
liturgy Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
mandata Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
marcion and marcionites Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
martyrs/martyrdom Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371
megiddo Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
memory Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
mosaics Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
neolithic/chalcolithic age (ca. Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371, 372
nicomedia Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
oracles Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
paul Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
pergamum Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
persia/persians, royal road Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 372
petronius mamertinus, marcus Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 115
philia, philoi Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
plinius minor Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
pliny (younger), consul, governor Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
pliny the younger Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 115; Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107; Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
pontius pilate Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
pontus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
proconsul Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
prophets, prophecy Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
prousa (in bithynia) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
provinces administration Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
provincial governors Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
prytaneis Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
repetundae (misgovernment), trials for Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
revelation of john Sandnes and Hvalvik, Early Christian Prayer and Identity Formation (2014) 189
revelations Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 42
roads, roman imperial road system Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 372
rome/romans, and christians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
sabbath Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 42
sacrifice, sacrificial victim Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
sacrifice Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
sacrifices, of humans Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
sacrifices, the eucharist Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
sapanca lake Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 372
secret, meetings Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
senate, in latin and greek, provinces Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
sermon Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 80
servants, as diakonos Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
stasis (factional conflict) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
sunday Alikin, The Earliest History of the Christian Gathering (2009) 42, 80
superstitio Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 203
table (τράπεζα) Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
tatian and celsus, education of christians and Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
temple, abandoned Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
tertullian, on catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
thebes Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
theseus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
thespiodes Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 139
tradition, roman religious Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
traianus Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
trajan, measures Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 403
trajan Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
trials, for maiestas' Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 108
valentinus and valentinians Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
veranius, quintus, governor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 371
vespasian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 58
visions, of heavenly altars and sacrifices Scopello, The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas (2008) 323
worship, early christian Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400
worship, heavenly worship Sandnes and Hvalvik, Early Christian Prayer and Identity Formation (2014) 189
ἄρτος τῆς εὐλογίας Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer, Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity (2022) 400