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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9460
Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17


nanTo Cornelius Titianus: Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men: there are still those to be found who keep friendly remembrances even of the dead. Titinius Capito has obtained permission from our Emperor to erect a statue of Lucius Silanus in the Forum. It is a graceful and entirely praiseworthy act to turn one's friendship with a sovereign to such a purpose, and to use all the influence one possesses to obtain honours for others. But Capito is a devoted hero-worshipper; it is remarkable how religiously and enthusiastically he regards the busts of the Bruti, the Cassii, and the Catos in his own house, where he may do as he pleases in this matter. He even composes splendid lyrics on the lives of all the most famous men of the past. Surely a man who is such an intense admirer of the virtue of others must know how to exemplify a crowd of virtues in his own person. Lucius Silanus quite deserved the honour that has been paid to him, and Capito in seeking to immortalise his memory has immortalised his own quite as much. For it is not more honourable and distinguished to have a statue of one's own in the Forum of the Roman People than to be the author of some one else's statue being placed there. Farewell.


nanTo Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 12.212 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.158, 2.2.160 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Polybius, Histories, 6.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6.53. 1.  Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the so‑called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2.  Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3.  As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4.  Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5.  This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6.  On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7.  These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8.  They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9.  and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10.  For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this?
4. Varro, On Agriculture, 3.5.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Livy, History, 25.40.1-25.40.3, 40.37.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.1-2.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 8.2 (1st cent. BCE

8. Strabo, Geography, 17.1.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17.1.8. The shape of the site of the city is that of a chlamys or military cloak. The sides, which determine the length, are surrounded by water, and are about thirty stadia in extent; but the isthmuses, which determine the breadth of the sides, are each of seven or eight stadia, bounded on one side by the sea, and on the other by the lake. The whole city is intersected by roads for the passage of horsemen and chariots. Two of these are very broad, exceeding a plethrum in breadth, and cut one another at right angles. It contains also very beautiful public grounds and royal palaces, which occupy a fourth or even a third part of its whole extent. For as each of the kings was desirous of adding some embellishment to the places dedicated to the public use, so, besides the buildings already existing, each of them erected a building at his own expense; hence the expression of the poet may be here applied, one after the other springs. All the buildings are connected with one another and with the harbour, and those also which are beyond it.The Museum is a part of the palaces. It has a public walk and a place furnished with seats, and a large hall, in which the men of learning, who belong to the Museum, take their common meal. This community possesses also property in common; and a priest, formerly appointed by the kings, but at present by Caesar, presides over the Museum.A part belonging to the palaces consists of that called Sema, an enclosure, which contained the tombs of the kings and that of Alexander (the Great). For Ptolemy the son of Lagus took away the body of Alexander from Perdiccas, as he was conveying it down from Babylon; for Perdiccas had turned out of his road towards Egypt, incited by ambition and a desire of making himself master of the country. When Ptolemy had attacked [and made him prisoner], he intended to [spare his life and] confine him in a desert island, but he met with a miserable end at the hand of his own soldiers, who rushed upon and despatched him by transfixing him with the long Macedonian spears. The kings who were with him, Aridaeus, and the children of Alexander, and Roxana his wife, departed to Macedonia. Ptolemy carried away the body of Alexander, and deposited it at Alexandreia in the place where it now lies; not indeed in the same coffin, for the present one is of hyalus (alabaster ?) whereas Ptolemy had deposited it in one of gold: it was plundered by Ptolemy surnamed Cocce's son and Pareisactus, who came from Syria and was quickly deposed, so that his plunder was of no service to him.
9. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.202-1.206, 8.654 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways 8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence
10. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE

11. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 60.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Cato The Elder, 19.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Tacitus, Agricola, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Tacitus, Annals, 3.76, 16.7-16.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.76.  Junia, too, born niece to Cato, wife of Caius Cassius, sister of Marcus Brutus, looked her last on life, sixty-three full years after the field of Philippi. Her will was busily discussed by the crowd; because in disposing of her great wealth she mentioned nearly every patrician of note in complimentary terms, but omitted the Caesar. The slur was taken in good part, and he offered no objection to the celebration of her funeral with a panegyric at the Rostra and the rest of the customary ceremonies. The effigies of twenty great houses preceded her to the tomb — members of the Manlian and Quinctian families, and names of equal splendour. But Brutus and Cassius shone brighter than all by the very fact that their portraits were unseen. 16.7.  To the death of Poppaea, outwardly regretted, but welcome to all who remembered her profligacy and cruelty, Nero added a fresh measure of odium by prohibiting Gaius Cassius from attendance at the funeral. It was the first hint of mischief. Nor was the mischief long delayed. Silanus was associated with him; their only crime being that Cassius was eminent for a great hereditary fortune and an austere character, Silanus for a noble lineage and a temperate youth. Accordingly, the emperor sent a speech to the senate, arguing that both should be removed from public life, and objecting to the former that, among his other ancestral effigies, he had honoured a bust of Gaius Cassius, inscribed:— "To the leader of the cause." The seeds of civil war, and revolt from the house of the Caesars, — such were the objects he had pursued. And, not to rely merely on the memory of a hated name as an incentive to faction, he had taken to himself a partner in Lucius Silanus, a youth of noble family and headstrong temper, who was to be his figure-head for a revolution. 16.8.  He then attacked Silanus himself in the same strain as his uncle Torquatus, alleging that he was already apportioning the responsibilities of empire, and appointing freedmen to the charge of "accounts, documents, and correspondence": an indictment at once frivolous and false; for the prevalent alarms had made Silanus vigilant, and his uncle's doom has terrified him into especial caution. Next, so‑called informers were introduced to forge against Lepida — wife of Cassius, aunt of Silanus — a tale of incest, committed with her brother's son, and of magical ceremonies. The senators Vulcacius Tullinus and Cornelius Marcellus were brought in as accomplices, with the Roman knight Calpurnius Fabatus. Their imminent condemnation they cheated by appealing to the emperor, and later, as being of minor importance, made good their escape from Nero, now fully occupied by crimes of the first magnitude. 16.9.  Then, by decree of the senate, sentences of exile were registered against Cassius and Silanus: on the case of Lepida the Caesar was to pronounce. Cassius was deported to the island of Sardinia, and old age left to do its work. Silanus, ostensibly bound for Naxos, was removed to Ostia, and afterwards confined in an Apulian town by the name of Barium. There, while supporting with philosophy his most unworthy fate, he was seized by a centurion sent for the slaughter. To the suggestion that he should cut an artery, he replied that he had, in fact, made up his mind to die, but could not excuse the assassin his glorious duty. The centurion, however, noticing that, if unarmed, he was very strongly built and betrayed more anger than timidity, ordered his men to overpower him. Silanus did not fail to struggle, and to strike with what vigour his bare fists permitted, until he dropped under the sword of the centurion, as upon a field of battle, his wounds in front.
16. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 60.25.2-60.25.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

60.25.2.  Accordingly, as in earlier times, one of the praetors, one of the tribunes, and one of each of the other groups of officials recited the oaths for their colleagues. This practice was followed for several years. In view of the fact that the city was becoming filled with a great multitude of images (for any who wished were free to have their likenesses appear in public in a painting or in bronze or marble) 60.25.3.  Claudius removed most of them elsewhere and for the future forbade that any private citizen should be allowed to follow the practice, except by permission of the senate or unless he should have built or repaired some public work; for he permitted such persons and their relatives to have their images set up in the places in question.
17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.30.2, 9.27.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.30.2. In the Academy is an altar to Prometheus, and from it they run to the city carrying burning torches. The contest is while running to keep the torch still alight; if the torch of the first runner goes out, he has no longer any claim to victory, but the second runner has. If his torch also goes out, then the third man is the victor. If all the torches go out, no one is left to be winner. There is an altar to the Muses, and another to Hermes, and one within to Athena, and they have built one to Heracles. There is also an olive tree, accounted to be the second that appeared. 9.27.3. Sappho of Lesbos wrote many poems about Love, but they are not consistent. Later on Lysippus made a bronze Love for the Thespians, and previously Praxiteles one of Pentelic marble. The story of Phryne and the trick she played on Praxiteles I have related in another place. See Paus. 1.20.1 . The first to remove the image of Love, it is said, was Gaius the Roman Emperor; Claudius, they say, sent it back to Thespiae, but Nero carried it away a second time.
18. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.7.8, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
19. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17, 3.7.8, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. To Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
20. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 5.51 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.51. I have also come across his will, couched in the following terms:All will be well; but in case anything should happen, I make these dispositions. I give and bequeath all my property at home to Melantes and Pancreon, the sons of Leon. It is my wish that out of the trust funds at the disposal of Hipparchus the following appropriations should be made. First, they should be applied to finish the rebuilding of the Museum with the statues of the goddesses, and to add any improvements which seem practicable to beautify them. Secondly, to replace in the sanctuary the bust of Aristotle with the rest of the dedicated offerings which formerly were in the sanctuary. Next, to rebuild the small stoa adjoining the Museum at least as handsomely as before, and to replace in the lower stoa the tablets containing maps of the countries traversed by explorers.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, the museion Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
acropolis, the philopappos monument Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
acropolis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
aemulatio Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
aesculapius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
alexandria, library of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
alexandria, the museion Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
alexandria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
apollo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
atella Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
athens Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
augustus, forum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
augustus, statues to himself forbidden Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
calatia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
campania Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
capito, titinius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
capua Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
cassius longinus, c., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
cassius longinus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94, 108
chain of exemplarity, broken under domitian Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
cicero, marcus tullius, triumphal ambitions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
conquers britain, statues to himself forbidden Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
cornelius scipio africanus, p., image in temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
elagabalus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
emulation Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
forum augustum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
hannibal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
hercules Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
his villa Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
house, atrium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
house, imagines in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
house, tablinum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
imagines, displayed in atria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
imagines Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
imitatio Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
imitation Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
impietas against, veneration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
inscriptions, in political process Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
julius caesar, c., image in jupiter capitolinus temple Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
junia tertulla Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94, 108
junius brutus, m., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
lararium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
leontini Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
macleod, r. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
material commemoration of exempla, statue of lucius silanus Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
memory Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
metellus, scipio Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
mnemosyne Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
monster, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
mousaeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
muse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
museion Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
museum, ancient definition of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
museum, and memory Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
nero, executes l. junius silanus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
nerva Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
nile Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
octavius, cn., naval victory over perseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
palestrina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
phidias, and olympian zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
plato, his academy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
pliny the younger Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
plutarch, on divine nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
polyclitus, the doryphorus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
polyclitus, the polyclitan canon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
pontifices, authority over statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
praxiteles, aphrodite of cnidos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
prosecutes marius priscus, his estate at tifernum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
ptolemy i soter Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
punic wars Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
res gestae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
role-modelling, in plinys letters' Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, scipios statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
salus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
scipio metellus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
servilius geminus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
sibyl, and sibylline books Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
silanus, lucius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
silius italicus, venerates vergils image Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
socrates Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
statius silvae Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
statuary, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
statuary, miraculous properties of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
statuary, over-population of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
statuary, sacred nature of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
statues, as yardstick of fame Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
strabo, on the library of alexandria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 22
style Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tacitus, on exemplarity Langlands, Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome (2018) 248
tauromenium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
titinius capito, cn., and l. junius silanus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
titinius capito, cn., venerates brutus and cassius images Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94, 108
tituli Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 51
trajan, pliny and statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 293
tullius cicero, m., on sacred nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tullius cicero, m., public versus private view of art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
tyndaris Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
venus, of cnidos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
vergil, image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., and the verralia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., public statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., statues overturned Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
viewers, shared values of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
zeus, olympian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108