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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.97
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Polybius, Histories, 3.14.1-3.14.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.14.2.  Subsequently on his return he unexpectedly found himself in great peril, the Carpetani, the strongest tribe in the district gathering to attack him and being joined by the neighbouring tribes
2. Sallust, Historiae, 3.63 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 8.2.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.18, 1.23, 3.6-3.7, 31.149, 32.35-32.36, 32.47, 62.1 (1st cent. CE

31.149.  You remember the notorious Acratus, who visited practically the whole inhabited world in this quest and passed by no village even — you recall how he came here likewise, and when you were, quite naturally, distressed, he said he had come to see the sights, for he had no authority to touch anything here. Therefore, apart from the beautiful sight which all the world may enjoy, the great number of your statues brings you a renown of another sort! For these things are manifestly a proof of your friendship for your rulers and of their respect for you. 32.35.  But to take just that topic which I mentioned in the beginning, see how important it is. For how you dine in private, how you sleep, how you manage your household, these are matters in which as individuals you are not at all conspicuous; on the other hand, how you behave as spectators and what you are like in the theatre are matters of common knowledge among Greeks and barbarians alike. For your city is vastly superior in point of size and situation, and it is admittedly ranked second among all cities beneath the sun. 32.36.  For not only does the mighty nation, Egypt, constitute the framework of your city — or more accurately its ')" onMouseOut="nd();"appendage — but the peculiar nature of the river, when compared with all others, defies description with regard to both its marvellous habits and its usefulness; and furthermore, not only have you a monopoly of the shipping of the entire Mediterranean by reason of the beauty of your harbours, the magnitude of your fleet, and the abundance and the marketing of the products of every land, but also the outer waters that lie beyond are in your grasp, both the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, whose name was rarely heard in former days. The result is that the trade, not merely of islands, ports, a few straits and isthmuses, but of practically the whole world is yours. For Alexandria is situated, as it were, at the cross-roads of the whole world, of even the most remote nations thereof, as if it were a market serving a single city, a market which brings together into one place all manner of men, displaying them to one another and, as far as possible, making them a kindred people. 62.1. And indeed, if a person is not competent to govern a single man, and that too a man who is very close to him, in fact his constant companion, and if, again, he cannot guide a single soul, and that his own, how could he be king, as you are, over unnumbered thousands scattered everywhere, many even dwelling at the ends of the earth, most of whom he has not even seen and never could see, and whose speech he will not understand? Why, it is as if one were to say of the man with vision so impaired that he cannot see even what lies at his feet but needs some one to lead him by the hand, that he can reach with his eyes the most distant objects, like those who at sea behold from afar both the mountains and the islands; or as if one were to say of the man who cannot make himself heard even by those who stand beside him, that he is able to speak so as to be heard by whole communities and armies.
5. Martial, Epigrams, 1.108.3-1.108.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Martial, Epigrams, 1.108.3-1.108.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 3.17, 7.96 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Annals, 15.45.1-15.45.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.45.1.  Meanwhile, Italy had been laid waste for contributions of money; the provinces, the federate communities, and the so‑called free states, were ruined. The gods themselves formed part of the plunder, as the ravaged temples of the capital were drained of the gold dedicated in the triumphs or the vows, the prosperity or the fears, of the Roman nation at every epoch. But in Asia and Achaia, not offerings alone but the images of deity were being swept away, since Acratus and Carrinas Secundus had been despatched into the two provinces. The former was a freedman prepared for any enormity; the latter, as far as words went, was a master of Greek philosophy, but his character remained untinctured by the virtues. Seneca, it was rumoured, to divert the odium of sacrilege from himself, had asked leave to retire to a distant estate in the country, and, when it was not accorded, had feigned illness — a neuralgic affection, he said — and declined to leave his bedroom. Some have put it on record that, by the orders of Nero, poison had been prepared for him by one of his freedmen, Cleonicus by name; and that, owing either to the man's revelations or to his own alarms, it was avoided by Seneca, who supported life upon an extremely simple diet of field fruits and, if thirst was insistent, spring water.
9. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 26.11-26.13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 51.20-51.21 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

51.20. 1.  These were the decrees passed at that time; and when he was consul for the fifth time, with Sextus Apuleius, they ratified all his acts by oath on the very first day of January. When the letter came regarding the Parthians, they further arranged that his name should be included in their hymns equally with those of the gods;,2.  that a tribe should be called the "Julian" after him; that he should wear the triumphal crown at all the festivals; that the senators who had participated in his victory should take part in the triumphal procession arrayed in purple-bordered togas;,3.  that the day on which he entered the city should be honoured with sacrifices by the whole population and be held sacred for evermore; and that he might choose priests even beyond the regular number, — as many, in fact, as he should wish on any occasion. This last-named privilege, handed down from that time, was afterwards indefinitely extended, so that I need not henceforth make a point of giving the exact number of such officials.,4.  Now Caesar accepted all but a few of these honours, though he expressly requested that one of them, the proposal that the whole population of the city should go out to meet him, should not be put into effect. Nevertheless, the action which pleased him more than all the decrees was the closing by the senate of the gates of Janus, implying that all their wars had entirely ceased, and the taking of the augurium salutis, which at this time fallen into disuse for the reasons I have mentioned.,5.  To be sure, there were still under arms the Treveri, who had brought in the Germans to help them, and the Cantabri, the Vaccaei, and the Astures, — the three last-named of whom were later subjugated by Statilius Taurus, and the former by Nonius Gallus, — and there were also numerous other disturbances going on in various regions; yet inasmuch as nothing of importance resulted from them, the Romans at the time did not consider that they were engaged in war, nor have I, for my part, anything notable to record about them.,6.  Caesar, meanwhile, besides attending to the general business, gave permission for the dedication of sacred precincts in Ephesus and in Nicaea to Rome and to Caesar, his father, whom he named the hero Julius. These cities had at that time attained chief place in Asia and in Bithynia respectively.,7.  He commanded that the Romans resident in these cities should pay honour to these two divinities; but he permitted the aliens, whom he styled Hellenes, to consecrate precincts to himself, the Asians to have theirs in Pergamum and the Bithynians theirs in Nicomedia. This practice, beginning under him, has been continued under other emperors, not only in the case of the Hellenic nations but also in that of all the others, in so far as they are subject to the Romans.,8.  For in the capital itself and in Italy generally no emperor, however worthy of renown he has been, has dared to do this; still, even there various divine honours are bestowed after their death upon such emperors as have ruled uprightly, and, in fact, shrines are built to them.,9.  All this took place in the winter; and the Pergamenians also received authority to hold the "sacred" games, as they called them, in honour of Caesar's temple. 51.21. 1.  In the course of the summer Caesar crossed over to Greece and to Italy; and when he entered the city, not only all the citizens offered sacrifice, as has been mentioned, but even the consul Valerius Potitus. Caesar, to be sure, was consul all that year as for the two preceding years, but Potitus was the successor of Sextus.,2.  It was he who publicly and in person offered sacrifices on behalf of the senate and of the people upon Caesar's arrival, a thing that had never been done in the case of any other person. After this Caesar bestowed eulogies and honours upon his lieutets, as was customary,,3.  and to Agrippa he further granted, among other distinctions, a dark blue flag in honour of his naval victory, and he gave gifts to the soldiers; to the people he distributed four hundred sesterces apiece, first to the men who were adults, and afterwards to the children because of his nephew Marcellus.,4.  In view of all this, and because he would not accept from the cities of Italy the gold required for the crowns they had voted him, and because, furthermore, he not only paid all the debts he himself owed to others, as has been stated, but also did not insist on the payment of others' debts to him, the Romans forgot all their unpleasant experiences and viewed his triumph with pleasure, quite as if the vanquished had all been foreigners.,5.  So vast an amount of money, in fact, circulated through all parts of the city alike, that the price of goods rose and loans for which the borrower had been glad to pay twelve per cent. could now be had for one third that rate. As for the triumph, Caesar celebrated on the first day his victories over the Pannonians and Dalmatians, the Iapydes and their neighbours, and some Germans and Gauls.,6.  For Gaius Carrinas had subdued the Morini and others who had revolted with them, and had repulsed the Suebi, who had crossed the Rhine to wage war. Not only did Carrinas, therefore, celebrate the triumph, — and that notwithstanding that his father had been put to death by Sulla and that he himself along with the others in like condition had once been debarred from holding office, — but Caesar also celebrated it, since the credit of the victory properly belonged to his position as supreme commander.,7.  This was the first day's celebration. On the second day the naval victory at Actium was commemorated, and on the third the subjugation of Egypt. Now all the processions proved notable, thanks to the spoils from Egypt, — in such quantities, indeed, had spoils been gathered there that they sufficed for all the processions, — but the Egyptian celebration surpassed them all in costliness and magnificence.,8.  Among other features, an effigy of the dead Cleopatra upon a couch was carried by, so that in a way she, too, together with the other captives and with her children, Alexander, also called Helios, and Cleopatra, called also Selene, was a part of the spectacle and a trophy in the procession.,9.  After this came Caesar, riding into the city behind them all. He did everything in the customary manner, except that he permitted his fellow-consul and the other magistrates, contrary to precedent, to follow him along with the senators who had participated in the victory; for it was usual for such officials to march in advance and for only the senators to follow.
11. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.39.2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acratus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
africa (continent) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
alexandria (egypt) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
apameia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
arevaci Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
atlantic ocean Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
augustus (emperor), building program of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
autun Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
baetica Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
baetis river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
barea Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
bastuli Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
caesars, roman Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
carpetani Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
carthageniensis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
carthago nova (new carthage) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
castulo, castulonenses Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
celtiberians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
durius river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
eumenes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
galba Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
hannibal of carthage Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
hispania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
humankind, unity of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
iberia (hispania) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
julius caesar, c. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
lusitania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
maps, and military intelligence Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
maps, of campania Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
maps Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
nero Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
oikoumene Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
oretani Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
painting, geōgraphikon pinaka Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
pompeius (pompey) magnus, cn. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
pompeius magnus, cn. Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 76
pompey the great, eastern conquests Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
pompey the great, list of spanish conquest Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
punic wars, first, second Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
pyrenees Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
relationship with caesars forum, lists of conquests in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
rome, map of campania in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
rome, temple of minerva Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
sertorius, q. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
tagus river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
trees, laurel Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205
urci Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
vaccaei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
vettones' Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 119
vipsanius agrippa, m., his map Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 205