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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.42


nanWe must not forget to discuss also the Pumice. characteristics of pumice. This name, of course, is given to the hollowed rocks in the buildings called by the Greeks Homes of the Muses, where such rocks hang from the ceilings so as to create an artificial imitation of a cave. But as for the pumice which is used as a depilatory for women, and nowadays also for men, and moreover, as Catullus reminds us, for books, the finest quality occurs in Melos, Nisyros, and the Aeolian Islands. The test of its quality is that it should be white, very light in weight, extremely porous and dry, and easy to grind, without being sandy when rubbed. In pharmacy it has a reducing and drying effect. It is calcined three times in a fire of pure charcoal and quenched the same number of times in white wine. It is then washed like cadmea, and having been dried is stored in a place as free from damp as possible. The powder is used mostly for eye-salves, since it gently cleanses ophthalmic ulcers and heals them, and removes the scars. Incidentally, some pharmacists, after calcining the pumice three times, prefer to let it cool rather than quench it, and then to pound it mixed with wine. It is added also to poultices, and is then most useful for treating sores on the head or the private parts. Tooth powders, too, are prepared from it. Theophrastus assures us that topers competing in drinking contests first take a dose of the powder, but states that they run a grave risk unless they fill themselves with wine at a single draught. He adds that the cooling properties of pumice are so powerful that new wine stops bubbling when pumice is added to it.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Cicero, De Oratore, 1.9-1.11, 1.17, 1.113 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.9. Neque enim te fugit omnium laudatarum artium procreatricem quandam et quasi parentem eam, quam filosofi/an Graeci vocant, ab hominibus doctissimis iudicari; in qua difficile est enumerare quot viri quanta scientia quantaque in suis studiis varietate et copia fuerint, qui non una aliqua in re separatim elaborarint, sed omnia, quaecumque possent, vel scientiae pervestigatione vel disserendi ratione comprehenderint. 1.10. Quis ignorat, ei, qui mathematici vocantur, quanta in obscuritate rerum et quam recondita in arte et multiplici subtilique versentur? Quo tamen in genere ita multi perfecti homines exstiterunt, ut nemo fere studuisse ei scientiae vehementius videatur, quin quod voluerit consecutus sit. Quis musicis, quis huic studio litterarum, quod profitentur ei, qui grammatici vocantur, penitus se dedit, quin omnem illarum artium paene infinitam vim et materiem scientia et cognitione comprehenderit? 1.11. Vere mihi hoc videor esse dicturus, ex omnibus eis, qui in harum artium liberalissimis studiis sint doctrinisque versati, minimam copiam poetarum et oratorum egregiorum exstitisse: atque in hoc ipso numero, in quo perraro exoritur aliquis excellens, si diligenter et ex nostrorum et ex Graecorum copia comparare voles, multo tamen pauciores oratores quam poetae boni reperientur. 1.17. Est enim et scientia comprehendenda rerum plurimarum, sine qua verborum volubilitas iis atque inridenda est, et ipsa oratio conformanda non solum electione, sed etiam constructione verborum, et omnes animorum motus, quos hominum generi rerum natura tribuit, penitus pernoscendi, quod omnis vis ratioque dicendi in eorum, qui audiunt, mentibus aut sedandis aut excitandis expromenda est; accedat eodem oportet lepos quidam facetiaeque et eruditio libero digna celeritasque et brevitas et respondendi et lacessendi subtili venustate atque urbanitate coniuncta; tenenda praeterea est omnis antiquitas exemplorumque vis, neque legum ac iuris civilis scientia neglegenda est. 1.113. 'Perge vero,' inquit 'Crasse,' Mucius; 'istam enim culpam, quam vereris, ego praestabo.' 'Sic igitur' inquit 'sentio,' Crassus 'naturam primum atque ingenium ad dicendum vim adferre maximam; neque vero istis, de quibus paulo ante dixit Antonius, scriptoribus artis rationem dicendi et viam, sed naturam defuisse; nam et animi atque ingeni celeres quidam motus esse debent, qui et ad excogitandum acuti et ad explicandum ordumque sint uberes et ad memoriam firmi atque diuturni;
2. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.131 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31 (1st cent. BCE

5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.114, 35.139, 36.14, 36.22, 36.24, 36.28, 36.35 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Augustus, 29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Annals, 15.38 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.38.  There followed a disaster, whether due to chance or to the malice of the sovereign is uncertain — for each version has its sponsors — but graver and more terrible than any other which has befallen this city by the ravages of fire. It took its rise in the part of the Circus touching the Palatine and Caelian Hills; where, among the shops packed with inflammable goods, the conflagration broke out, gathered strength in the same moment, and, impelled by the wind, swept the full length of the Circus: for there were neither mansions screened by boundary walls, nor temples surrounded by stone enclosures, nor obstructions of any description, to bar its progress. The flames, which in full career overran the level districts first, then shot up to the heights, and sank again to harry the lower parts, kept ahead of all remedial measures, the mischief travelling fast, and the town being an easy prey owing to the narrow, twisting lanes and formless streets typical of old Rome. In addition, shrieking and terrified women; fugitives stricken or immature in years; men consulting their own safety or the safety of others, as they dragged the infirm along or paused to wait for them, combined by their dilatoriness or their haste to impede everything. often, while they glanced back to the rear, they were attacked on the flanks or in front; or, if they had made their escape into a neighbouring quarter, that also was involved in the flames, and even districts which they had believed remote from danger were found to be in the same plight. At last, irresolute what to avoid or what to seek, they crowded into the roads or threw themselves down in the fields: some who had lost the whole of their means — their daily bread included — chose to die, though the way of escape was open, and were followed by others, through love for the relatives whom they had proved unable to rescue. None ventured to combat the fire, as there were reiterated threats from a large number of persons who forbade extinction, and others were openly throwing firebrands and shouting that "they had their authority" — possibly in order to have a freer hand in looting, possibly from orders received.
9. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.27.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.27.3. Sappho of Lesbos wrote many poems about Love, but they are not consistent. Later on Lysippus made a bronze Love for the Thespians, and previously Praxiteles one of Pentelic marble. The story of Phryne and the trick she played on Praxiteles I have related in another place. See Paus. 1.20.1 . The first to remove the image of Love, it is said, was Gaius the Roman Emperor; Claudius, they say, sent it back to Thespiae, but Nero carried it away a second time.
10. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 1.11.3, 2.1.2, 2.81.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles tatius, and the leucippe and clitophon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
aelius sejanus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
alcibiades, and eros Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
antiphilus, his alexander, philip, and athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
antiphilus, his hesione Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
architects Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
artemis, of ephesus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
artemon, works in portico of octavia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
augustus, forum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
caecilius metellus macedonicus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
cephisodotus, his aesculapius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
cephisodotus, his diana Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
cornelia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
croesus, king of lydia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
danaë Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
daphnis and chloe Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
delphi, guides at Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
dionysius, his zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
doidalses, his venus at bath Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
elsner, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
fasti antiates maiores Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
favro, d. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
female spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forum augustum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forum iulium Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forums, imperial Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
fulvius nobilior, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
greece, culture appropriated by romans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
guides Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
hellenistic architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
hercules, and deianira Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
his pan and olympus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
inscriptions Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
laomedon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
leontini Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
livia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
love trysts, venues for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
lysippus, his granicus group Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
mars avenger, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
metellus macedonicus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
mummius achaicus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
museum, proper behaviour in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
mystagogi Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
neptune Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
objects, and inscriptions Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
objects, and meaning Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
objects, sacralized Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
objects, viewer understanding of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
periēgetai Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
philip ii of macedon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
philiscus of rhodes, his aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
pliny the younger, and comum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
polycharmus, his aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
polycles, his zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
portico of livia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
porticos Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
praxiteles, eros Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
romance, venues for' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
rome, portico of octavia, a famous eros in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, and athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, and phidias aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, and the granicus group Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, gabinius deposits standards in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, its scholae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, praxiteles works in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259, 271
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
rome, temple of concordia, and tiberius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
rome, temple of concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
rome, temple of jupiter stator, junos statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
saepta iulia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
scopas, cupid attributed to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
stewart, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
stratonice Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
style Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
tauromenium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
temple of mars avenger Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
tiberius, his phil-hellenism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 271
tyndaris Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
verres, c., appropriates art works in syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118
viewers, and literacy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 118