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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.33


nanThe 'melitinus' stone exudes a liquid that is sweet and is like honey. When pounded and mixed with wax it cures acute catarrh, spots on the skin and sore throats, and removes sores on the eyelids; and if applied on a wool dressing it causes pains in the uterus to disappear.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.6.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.6.5.  A birth like that of Priapus is ascribed by some writers of myths to Hermaphroditus, as he has been called, who was born of Hermes and Aphroditê and received a name which is a combination of those of both his parents. Some say that this Hermaphroditus is a god and appears at certain times among men, and that he is born with a physical body which is a combination of that of a man and that of a woman, in that he has a body which is beautiful and delicate like that of a woman, but has the masculine quality and vigour of a man. But there are some who declare that such creatures of two sexes are monstrosities, and coming rarely into the world as they do have the quality of presaging the future, sometimes for evil and sometimes for good. But let this be enough for us on such matters.
2. Horace, Odes, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.1. 1. Now the necessity which Archelaus was under of taking a journey to Rome was the occasion of new disturbances; for when he had mourned for his father seven days, and had given a very expensive funeral feast to the multitude (which custom is the occasion of poverty to many of the Jews, because they are forced to feast the multitude; for if anyone omits it, he is not esteemed a holy person), he put on a white garment, and went up to the temple 2.1. And, indeed, at the feast of unleavened bread, which was now at hand, and is by the Jews called the Passover, and used to be celebrated with a great number of sacrifices, an innumerable multitude of the people came out of the country to worship; some of these stood in the temple bewailing the Rabbins [that had been put to death], and procured their sustece by begging, in order to support their sedition. 2.1. but after this family distribution, he gave between them what had been bequeathed to him by Herod, which was a thousand talents, reserving to himself only some inconsiderable presents, in honor of the deceased.
3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.288-4.291, 4.320-4.321 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.70-3.1.72 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.9-35.10, 35.28, 35.86, 36.26, 36.29, 36.34-36.35, 36.37 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Advice To Bride And Groom, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

138c. that which deals with marriage deserves no less serious attention than any other, for by means of it philosophy weaves a spell over those who are entering together into a lifelong partnership, and renders them gentle and amiable toward each other. Ihave therefore drawn up a compendium of what you, who have been brought up in the atmosphere of philosophy, have often heard, putting it in the form of brief comparisons that it may be more easily remembered, and Iam sending it as a gift for you both to possess in common; and at the same time Ipray that the Muses may lend their presence and co‑operation to Aphrodite, and may feel that it is no more fitting for them to provide a lyre or lute well attuned than it is to provide that the harmony which concerns marriage and the household shall be well attuned through reason, concord, and philosophy. Indeed, the ancients gave Hermes a place at the side of Aphrodite, in the conviction that pleasure in marriage stands especially in need of reason;
7. Tacitus, Annals, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.72.  Nearly at the same time, Marcus Lepidus asked permission from the senate to strengthen and decorate the Basilica of Paulus, a monument of the Aemilian house, at his own expense. Public munificence was a custom still; nor had Augustus debarred a Taurus, a Philippus, or a Balbus from devoting the trophies of his arms or the overflow of his wealth to the greater splendour of the capital and the glory of posterity: and now Lepidus, a man of but moderate fortune, followed in their steps by renovating the famous edifice of his fathers. On the other hand, the rebuilding of the Theatre of Pompey, destroyed by a casual fire, was undertaken by Caesar, on the ground that no member of the family was equal to the task of restoration: the name of Pompey was, however, to remain. At the same time, he gave high praise to Sejanus, "through whose energy and watchfulness so grave an outbreak had stopped at one catastrophe." The Fathers voted a statue to Sejanus, to be placed in the Theatre of Pompey. Again, a short time afterwards, when he was honouring Junius Blaesus, proconsul of Africa, with the triumphal insignia, he explained that he did so as a compliment to Sejanus, of whom Blaesus was uncle. — None the less the exploits of Blaesus deserved such a distinction.
8. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 2.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.15.4, 2.19.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.15.4. Here are dedicated brazen shields, and some have an inscription that they are taken from the Scioneans and their allies 421 B.C., while others, smeared with pitch lest they should be worn by age and rust, are said to be those of the Lacedaemonians who were taken prisoners in the island of Sphacteria . 425 B.C. 2.19.6. As to the wooden images of Aphrodite and Hermes, the one they say was made by Epeus, while the other is a votive offering of Hypermnestra. She was the only one of the daughters of Danaus who neglected his command, To kill their husbands. and was accordingly brought to justice by him, because be considered that his life was in danger so long as Lynceus was at large, and that the refusal to share in the crime of her sisters increased the disgrace of the contriver of the deed. On her trial she was acquitted by the Argives, and to commemorate her escape she dedicated an image of Aphrodite, the Bringer of Victory.
10. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.12.16, 2.4.21 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

11. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.12.16, 2.4.21 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, the stoa poikile Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
aeneas Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106
aesthetics, of horror Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
anchises Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106
aphrodite Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 114; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
apollo Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134, 151; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
apollonius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
arcesilaus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
art, roman Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
artemis Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
asinius pollio, collection of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223, 224
asinius pollio, his republicanism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13, 224
auctoritas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
augustus, his hellenism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
augustus, independent building projects encouraged Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
bacchants Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
baths/bathing Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106
battle Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
caduceus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
caryatids Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
cephisodotus, works in atrium libertatis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
cephisodotus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
cleomenes, his thespiades Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
cupid, son of hermes and aphrodite Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
cupid-apollo quarrel Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
cupid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134, 151
dionysus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
dirce Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
dirke Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
eros Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134, 151
eutychides Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
fulvius nobilior, m., adorns the temple of hercules musarum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
fulvius nobilior, m., his res gestae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
glycon Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 114
herdsman, and the lyre Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
herm Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
hermaphrodite/hermaphroditus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134, 151
hermes, and athens Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
hermes, cult of Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
hermes, erotic, see also erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134
hermes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
hermoerotes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
his oceanus and zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223, 224
horace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
horti Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106
ithyphallic, see also phallic' Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
libraries, of asinius pollio Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
marcius philippus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
megabyzus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
mercury/hermes, and cupid in art Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
mercury/hermes, and venus/aphrodite Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
mercury/hermes, in cult Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
muse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
myth, foundation Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
neptune Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
objects, access to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
objects, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
objects, their maintenance Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
objects, their security Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
objects, upkeep of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
orphic hymns Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
ovid, amores Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
ovid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134, 151
palaestra Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 114
papylus, his zeus hospitalis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
praxiteles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
romanitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
rome, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223, 224
rome, its library Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
rome, tabularium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
rome, temple of hercules musarum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
rome, theatre of balbus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
rule, baths of caracalla Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 114
rule, rome, city of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
salmacis Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134
sanctuary ( Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106
scopas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
sileni Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
sparta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
sphacteria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 13
state reliefs, guilded Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 114
state reliefs, mythological Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
state reliefs, of colossal scale Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106, 114
statilius taurus, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
stephanus, his nymphs of appia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
suda Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 151
tauriscus of tralles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 223
venus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 134, 151; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
vesta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224
villa Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 106
vitruvius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 224