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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.28


nanHowever, there are stones that are gentler in their effects in that they preserve a body without consuming it, for example, the 'chernites,' which closely resembles ivory and is said to be the material of which the coin of Darius is said to have been made, and, again, a stone called 'porus,' which is similar to Parian marble in whiteness and hardness, only not so heavy. Theophrastus is our authority also for a translucent Egyptian stone said by him to be similar to Chian marble. Such a stone may have existed in his time: stones cease to be found and new ones are discovered in turn., The stone of Assos, which has a salty taste, relieves gout if the feet are plunged into a vessel hollowed out of it. Moreover, all affections of the legs are cured in the quarries where it is hewn, whereas in all mines the legs are attacked by ailments. Belonging to the same stone is what is called the efflorescence, which is soft enough to form powder and is just as effective as the stone for certain purposes. It looks, incidentally, like reddish pumice. Combined with Cyprian wax it cures affections of the breasts, and, if mixed with pitch or resin, disperses scrofulous sores and superficial abscesses. Taken as an electuary it is also good for consumption. When blended with honey, it causes scars to form over chronic sores, reduces excrescences of flesh and dries up matter discharging from a bite when it will not yield to other treatment. In cases of gout a plaster is made of it with an admixture of bean-meal.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Cicero, Philippicae, 9.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Livy, History, 4.29.7, 39.2.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Livy, Per., 140 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.69-3.1.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Appian, Civil Wars, 3.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE

7. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.30, 35.4-35.5, 35.114, 35.139, 36.14, 36.22, 36.24, 36.27, 36.29, 36.34-36.35, 36.42 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 4.1-4.2, 24.3-24.4, 60.2-60.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Marcellus, 30.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30.6. And his line maintained its splendour down to Marcellus the nephew of Augustus Caesar, who was a son of Caesar’s sister Octavia by Caius Marcellus, and who died during his aedileship at Rome, having recently married a daughter of Caesar. In his honour and to his memory Octavia his mother dedicated the library, and Caesar the theatre, which bear his name.
10. Plutarch, Marius, 17.1-17.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Suetonius, De Grammaticis, 21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Suetonius, Domitianus, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Tacitus, Histories, 4.61 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.61.  Civilis, in accordance with a vow such as these barbarians frequently make, had dyed his hair red and let it grow long from the time he first took up arms against the Romans, but now that the massacre of the legions was finally accomplished, he cut it short; it was also said that he presented his little son with some captives to be targets for the child's arrows and darts. However, he did not bind himself or any Batavian by an oath of allegiance to Gaul, for he relied on the resources of the Germans, and he felt that, if it became necessary to dispute the empire with the Gauls, he would have the advantage of his reputation and his superior power. Munius Lupercus, commander of a legion, was sent, among other gifts, to Veleda. This maiden of the tribe of the Bructeri enjoyed extensive authority, according to the ancient German custom, which regards many women as endowed with prophetic powers and, as the superstition grows, attributes divinity to them. At this time Veleda's influence was at its height, since she had foretold the German success and the destruction of the legions. But Lupercus was killed on the road. A few of the centurions and tribunes of Gallic birth were reserved as hostages to assure the alliance. The winter quarters of the auxiliary infantry and cavalry and of the legions were pulled down and burned, with the sole exception of those at Mainz and Vindonissa.
14. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.8.1, 60.25.2-60.25.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

60.25.2.  Accordingly, as in earlier times, one of the praetors, one of the tribunes, and one of each of the other groups of officials recited the oaths for their colleagues. This practice was followed for several years. In view of the fact that the city was becoming filled with a great multitude of images (for any who wished were free to have their likenesses appear in public in a painting or in bronze or marble) 60.25.3.  Claudius removed most of them elsewhere and for the future forbade that any private citizen should be allowed to follow the practice, except by permission of the senate or unless he should have built or repaired some public work; for he permitted such persons and their relatives to have their images set up in the places in question.
15. Gellius, Attic Nights, 5.21.9, 13.20, 16.8.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.27.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.27.3. Sappho of Lesbos wrote many poems about Love, but they are not consistent. Later on Lysippus made a bronze Love for the Thespians, and previously Praxiteles one of Pentelic marble. The story of Phryne and the trick she played on Praxiteles I have related in another place. See Paus. 1.20.1 . The first to remove the image of Love, it is said, was Gaius the Roman Emperor; Claudius, they say, sent it back to Thespiae, but Nero carried it away a second time.
17. Various, Anthologia Latina, 9.730

18. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.1.2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius, l. Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 258
alcibiades, and eros Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
antiphilus, his alexander, philip, and athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
antiphilus, his hesione Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
antony, marc, and bacchus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
antony, marc, and de ebrietate sua Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
apollo, as citharode Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
architecture Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
archive Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
artemon, works in portico of octavia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
augustus, and apollo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, and romanitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, and the palatine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, civilization versus barbarism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, cleans capitoline of statues Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
augustus, his hellenism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
aulus gellius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
bacchants Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
benefactor Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
caecilius metellus macedonicus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
cephisodotus, his aesculapius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
cephisodotus, his diana Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
cornelia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
cornelius scipio nasica, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
danaë Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
dionysius, his zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
documents, legal and administrative Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
doidalses, his venus at bath Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
dresden Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
elsner, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
fasti antiates maiores Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 258
favro, d. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 244
forma urbis romae Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
freedman Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
galen Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
hercules, and deianira Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
hercules Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
hermae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
hermathena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
his pan and olympus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
jews, c. sosius defeats Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
laomedon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
latin Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
latona Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
leontini Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
library, administration of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
library, imperial Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
library Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
lysippus, his granicus group Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
lysippus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
maecenas, c. Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
map of rome see forma urbis romae of the world Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
marius, c., and the prophetess martha Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
melissus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
mummius achaicus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
museum, proper behaviour in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
myron, his bull Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
neptune Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
niobe Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
niobidae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
objects, and identity Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
objects, sacralized Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
phidias Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
philip ii of macedon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259, 303
philiscus of rhodes, his aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
philiscus of rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 303
pliny the younger, and comum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
polycharmus, his aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
polycles, his zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
popilius laenas, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
praefectura Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
praxiteles, eros Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
praxiteles, niobe and the niobidae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
roman, power Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
rome, forum of peace, and venus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, portico of metellus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 258
rome, portico of octavia, a famous eros in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, and athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, and phidias aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, and the granicus group Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, gabinius deposits standards in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia, its curia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 258
rome, portico of octavia, its library Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 258
rome, portico of octavia, its scholae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 258, 259
rome, portico of octavia, praxiteles works in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, portico of octavia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 258, 259, 303
rome, saepta julia, statues of achilles and chiron in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, saepta julia, statues of olympus and pan in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, temple of apollo palatinus, gauls depicted on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
rome, temple of apollo palatinus, portico of the danaids Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244, 303
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
rome, temple of juno regina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 258
rome, temple of jupiter stator, junos statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
rome, theatre of marcellus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 258
rule, porticus octaviae Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
rule, rome, city of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
rule, senate' Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
rule, temple of apollo palatinus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
rule, templum pacis Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
scopas, cupid attributed to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
scopas, his bacchant Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
scopas, niobe and the niobidae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
seleucia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
simulacrum versus signum, of wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
sinnius capito Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 298
sosius, c., and herod the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
sosius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
statuary, over-population of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
statuary, problems of identification Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
stewart, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
stratonice Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 259
style Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
tauromenium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
timarchides, works in temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
tullius cicero, m., as collector Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
tullius cicero, m., his academy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
tullius cicero, m., villa at tusculum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62
tyndaris Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
veleda Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 62