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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.27-36.29


nanAt Assos in the Troad we find the Sarcophagus stone, which splits along a line of cleavage. It is well known that corpses buried in it are consumed within a period of forty days, except for the teeth: Mucianus vouches for the fact that mirrors, scrapers, clothes and shoes placed upon the dead bodies are turned to stone as well. There are similar stones both in Lycia and in the East; and these, when attached even to living persons, eat away their bodies.


nanHowever, there are stones that are gentler in their effects in that they preserve a body without consuming it, for example, the 'chernites,' which closely resembles ivory and is said to be the material of which the coin of Darius is said to have been made, and, again, a stone called 'porus,' which is similar to Parian marble in whiteness and hardness, only not so heavy. Theophrastus is our authority also for a translucent Egyptian stone said by him to be similar to Chian marble. Such a stone may have existed in his time: stones cease to be found and new ones are discovered in turn., The stone of Assos, which has a salty taste, relieves gout if the feet are plunged into a vessel hollowed out of it. Moreover, all affections of the legs are cured in the quarries where it is hewn, whereas in all mines the legs are attacked by ailments. Belonging to the same stone is what is called the efflorescence, which is soft enough to form powder and is just as effective as the stone for certain purposes. It looks, incidentally, like reddish pumice. Combined with Cyprian wax it cures affections of the breasts, and, if mixed with pitch or resin, disperses scrofulous sores and superficial abscesses. Taken as an electuary it is also good for consumption. When blended with honey, it causes scars to form over chronic sores, reduces excrescences of flesh and dries up matter discharging from a bite when it will not yield to other treatment. In cases of gout a plaster is made of it with an admixture of bean-meal.


nanTheophrastus, again, and Mucianus express the opinion that there are certain stones that give birth to other stones. Theophrastus states also that fossil ivory coloured black and white is found, that bones are produced from the earth and that stones resembling bones come to light., In the neighbourhood of Munda in Spain, the place where Julius Caesar defeated Cn. Pompeius, occur stones containing the likeness of a palm branch, which appears whenever they are broken. There are also black stones, like that of Taenarum, that have come to be esteemed as much as any marble. Varro states that black stones from Africa are harder than the Italian, but that, on the other hand, the white stone of Cora is harder than that of Paros. He mentions too that Carrara stone can be cut with a saw, that Tusculan stone is split by fire and that the dark Sabine variety actually becomes bright if oil is poured on it. Varro also assures us that rotary querns have been found at Bolsena; and we find in records of miraculous occurrences that some querns have even moved of their own accord.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.158, 2.2.160, 2.4.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Philippicae, 9.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.66 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Livy, Per., 140 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Fasti, 6.217-6.218 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.217. The Sabines of old granted him a shrine accordingly 6.218. And established it on the Quirinal Hill.
6. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.61, 3.1.69-3.1.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31.3-2.31.4 (1st cent. BCE

8. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE

9. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 19.7, 19.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19.7. Nor did he abstain from the plunder of any of the Grecian temples, and gave order that all the engravings and sculptures, and the rest of the ornaments of the statues and donations therein dedicated, should be brought to him, saying that the best things ought to be set no where but in the best place, and that the city of Rome was that best place. 19.7. 11. However, the execution of Cherea’s designs was put off from day to day, by the sloth of many therein concerned; for as to Cherea himself, he would not willingly make any delay in that execution, thinking every time a fit time for it; for frequent opportunities offered themselves;
10. Juvenal, Satires, 6.156-6.157 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.30, 35.4-35.5, 36.22, 36.28-36.29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Suetonius, Caligula, 22.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Tacitus, Annals, 16.23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.23.  As to Barea Soranus, the Roman knight, Ostorius Sabinus, had already claimed him for his own, in a case arising from Soranus' proconsulate of Asia; during which he increased the emperor's malignity by his fairness and his energy, by the care he had spent upon clearing the harbour of Ephesus, and by his failure to punish the city of Pergamum for employing force to prevent the loot of its statues and paintings by the Caesarian freedman, Acratus. But the charges preferred were friendship with Plautus and popularity-hunting in his province with a view of the winning it for the cause of revolution. The time chosen for the condemnation was the moment when Tiridates was on the point of arriving to be invested with the crown of Armenia; the object being that, with public curiosity diverted to foreign affairs, domestic crime might be thrown into shadow, or, possibly, that the imperial greatness might be advertised by the royal feat of slaughtering illustrious men.
14. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 60.25.2-60.25.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

60.25.2.  Accordingly, as in earlier times, one of the praetors, one of the tribunes, and one of each of the other groups of officials recited the oaths for their colleagues. This practice was followed for several years. In view of the fact that the city was becoming filled with a great multitude of images (for any who wished were free to have their likenesses appear in public in a painting or in bronze or marble) 60.25.3.  Claudius removed most of them elsewhere and for the future forbade that any private citizen should be allowed to follow the practice, except by permission of the senate or unless he should have built or repaired some public work; for he permitted such persons and their relatives to have their images set up in the places in question.
15. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
16. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
17. Various, Anthologia Latina, 9.730



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acratus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
artworks Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227
augustus, cleans capitoline of statues Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
aurelius, marcus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
carrinas secundus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
cornelius scipio nasica, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
curatores, a pinacothecis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
curatores, a statuis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
curatores, a tabulis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
curatores, ad imagines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
curatores, mausolei Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
curatores, pontifex minor Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
dedicates statue of pax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
domus aurea, public versus private access Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
elsner, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
fasti antiates maiores Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
favro, d. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
flavius apollonius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
greece, and tourism in antiquity Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
greece, caligula loots Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
greece, nero loots Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
italy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
josephus, on caligulas plundering of greece Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
leontini Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
lysippus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
memmius regulus, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
mummius achaicus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
museum, proper behaviour in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
myron, his bull Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
naukydes, portrait of cheimon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
nero, tours and pillages greece Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
objects, inventory of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
objects, repatriation of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
objects, sacralized Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
olympia, nero loots Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
painting Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227
pergamum, neros attempted looting of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
phidias Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
philip ii of macedon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
pliny the elder Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92, 303
pliny the younger, and comum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
popilius laenas, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
porticus argonautarum Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227
praxiteles, eros Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
rome, baths of caracalla Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
rome, caligula adorns Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
rome, fire of ad Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
rome, forum of peace, and augustus rome, forum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
rome, forum of peace, and julius caesars forum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
rome, forum of peace, and the domus aurea Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
rome, forum of peace, and venus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273, 303
rome, forum of peace, cult statue of pax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
rome, forum of peace, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
rome, forum of peace Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
rome, portico of octavia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, saepta julia, statues of achilles and chiron in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, saepta julia, statues of olympus and pan in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, temple of aesculapius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, cleaned Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302
rome Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227
sculptures' Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227
sicyon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
statuary, over-population of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 302, 303
statuary, problems of identification Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
stewart, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
style Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
tauromenium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
thespiae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
tullius cicero, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 52
tyndaris Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 92
venus Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227
vespasian, and augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
vespasian, and nero Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273
vespasian Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 227; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 273