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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.13


nanMany people consider that for the preservation of unguents there is little to choose between onyx marble and the 'lygdinus,' which is found in Paros in pieces no larger than a dish or mixing bowl, although in earlier times it was normally imported only from Arabia. It is of an exceptionally brilliant whiteness. Two stones of a directly opposed character are also greatly esteemed. There is the coral stone found in the province of Asia in sizes not exceeding two cubits, with a white colour close to that of ivory and a certain resemblance to it in appearance. On the other hand, the stone named after Alabanda, its place of origin, although it occurs also at Miletus, is black. In appearance, however, this stone tends rather to have a reddish tinge. It can, moreover, be melted by fire and fused to serve as glass. The Thebaie stone mottled with gold spots is found in a part of Africa that has been assigned to Egypt and is naturally well adapted for use as stones on which to grind eye-salves. The granite of Syene is found in the neighbourhood of Syene in the Thebaid and in earlier times was known as pyrrhopoecilos.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

26 results
1. Euripides, Bacchae, 1021 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1021. γελῶντι προσώπῳ περίβαλε βρόχον
2. Euripides, Electra, 1255-1257, 1254 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1254. ἐλθὼν δ' ̓Αθήνας Παλλάδος σεμνὸν βρέτας
3. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.2.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Letters, 1.3.17, 2.1.248-2.1.249 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Livy, History, 29.14.10-29.14.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 1.261-1.262, 4.225-4.344, 4.951-4.954 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.261. And how the treacherous keeper, Tarpeia, bribed with bracelets 1.262. Led the silent Sabines to the heights of the citadel. 4.225. She desired him to serve her, and protect her temple 4.226. And said: “Wish, you might be a boy for ever.” 4.227. He promised to be true, and said: “If I’m lying 4.228. May the love I fail in be my last love.” 4.229. He did fail, and in meeting the nymph Sagaritis 4.230. Abandoned what he was: the goddess, angered, avenged it. 4.231. She destroyed the Naiad, by wounding a tree 4.232. Since the tree contained the Naiad’s fate. 4.233. Attis was maddened, and thinking his chamber’s roof 4.234. Was falling, fled for the summit of Mount Dindymus. 4.235. Now he cried: “Remove the torches”, now he cried: 4.236. “Take the whips away”: often swearing he saw the Furies. 4.237. He tore at his body too with a sharp stone 4.238. And dragged his long hair in the filthy dust 4.239. Shouting: “I deserved this! I pay the due penalty 4.240. In blood! Ah! Let the parts that harmed me, perish! 4.241. Let them perish!” cutting away the burden of his groin 4.242. And suddenly bereft of every mark of manhood. 4.243. His madness set a precedent, and his unmanly servant 4.244. Toss their hair, and cut off their members as if worthless.’ 4.245. So the Aonian Muse, eloquently answering the question 4.246. I’d asked her, regarding the causes of their madness. 4.247. ‘Guide of my work, I beg you, teach me also, where She 4.248. Was brought from. Was she always resident in our City? 4.249. ‘The Mother Goddess always loved Dindymus, Cybele 4.250. And Ida, with its pleasant streams, and the Trojan realm: 4.251. And when Aeneas brought Troy to Italian fields, the godde 4.252. Almost followed those ships that carried the sacred relics. 4.253. But she felt that fate didn’t require her powers in Latium 4.254. So she stayed behind in her long-accustomed place. 4.255. Later, when Rome was more than five centuries old 4.256. And had lifted its head above the conquered world 4.257. The priest consulted the fateful words of Euboean prophecy: 4.258. They say that what he found there was as follows: 4.259. ‘The Mother’s absent: Roman, I command you: seek the Mother. 4.260. When she arrives, she must be received in chaste hands.’ 4.261. The dark oracle’s ambiguity set the senators puzzling 4.262. As to who that parent might be, and where to seek her. 4.263. Apollo was consulted, and replied: ‘Fetch the Mother 4.264. of all the Gods, who you’ll find there on Mount Ida.’ 4.265. Noblemen were sent. Attalus at that time held 4.266. The Phrygian sceptre: he refused the Italian lords. 4.267. Marvellous to tell, the earth shook with long murmurs 4.268. And the goddess, from her shrine, spoke as follows: 4.269. ‘I myself wished them to seek me: don’t delay: send me 4.270. Willingly. Rome is a worthy place for all divinities.’ 4.271. Quaking with fear at her words, Attalus, said: ‘Go 4.272. You’ll still be ours: Rome claims Phrygian ancestry.’ 4.273. Immediately countless axes felled the pine-tree 4.274. Those trees pious Aeneas employed for his flight: 4.275. A thousand hands work, and the heavenly Mother 4.276. Soon has a hollow ship, painted in fiery colours. 4.277. She’s carried in perfect safety over her son’s waves 4.278. And reaches the long strait named for Phrixus’ sister 4.279. Passes fierce Rhoetum and the Sigean shore 4.280. And Tenedos and Eetion’s ancient kingdom. 4.281. Leaving Lesbos behind she then steered for the Cyclades 4.282. And the waves that break on Euboea’s Carystian shoals. 4.283. She passed the Icarian Sea, as well, where Icarus shed 4.284. His melting wings, giving his name to a vast tract of water. 4.285. Then leaving Crete to larboard, and the Pelopian wave 4.286. To starboard, she headed for Cythera, sacred to Venus. 4.287. From there to the Sicilian Sea, where Brontes, Sterope 4.288. And Aemonides forge their red-hot iron 4.289. Then, skirting African waters, she saw the Sardinian 4.290. Realm behind to larboard, and reached our Italy. 4.291. She’d arrived at the mouth (ostia) where the Tiber divide 4.292. To meet the deep, and flows with a wider sweep: 4.293. All the Knights, grave Senators, and commoners 4.294. Came to meet her at the mouth of the Tuscan river. 4.295. With them walked mothers, daughters, and brides 4.296. And all those virgins who tend the sacred fires. 4.297. The men wearied their arms hauling hard on the ropes: 4.298. The foreign vessel barely made way against the stream. 4.299. For a long time there’d been a drought: the grass was dry 4.300. And scorched: the boat stuck fast in the muddy shallows. 4.301. Every man, hauling, laboured beyond his strength 4.302. And encouraged their toiling hands with his cries. 4.303. Yet the ship lodged there, like an island fixed in mid-ocean: 4.304. And astonished at the portent, men stood and quaked. 4.305. Claudia Quinta traced her descent from noble Clausus 4.306. And her beauty was in no way unequal to her nobility: 4.307. She was chaste, but not believed so: hostile rumour 4.308. Had wounded her, false charges were levelled at her: 4.309. Her elegance, promenading around in various hairstyles 4.310. And her ready tongue, with stiff old men, counted against her. 4.311. Conscious of virtue, she laughed at the rumoured lies 4.312. But we’re always ready to credit others with faults. 4.313. Now, when she’d stepped from the line of chaste women 4.314. Taking pure river water in her hands, she wetted her head 4.315. Three times, three times lifted her palms to the sky 4.316. (Everyone watching her thought she’d lost her mind) 4.317. Then, kneeling, fixed her eyes on the goddess’s statue 4.318. And, with loosened hair, uttered these words: 4.319. “ Kind and fruitful Mother of the Gods, accept 4.320. A suppliant’s prayers, on this one condition: 4.321. They deny I’m chaste: let me be guilty if you condemn me: 4.322. Convicted by a goddess I’ll pay for it with my life. 4.323. But if I’m free of guilt, grant a pledge of my innocence 4.324. By your action: and, chaste, give way to my chaste hands.” 4.325. She spoke: then gave a slight pull at the rope 4.326. (A wonder, but the sacred drama attests what I say): 4.327. The goddess stirred, followed, and, following, approved her: 4.328. Witness the sound of jubilation carried to the stars. 4.329. They came to a bend in the river (called of old 4.330. The Halls of Tiber): there the stream turns left, ascending. 4.331. Night fell: they tied the rope to an oak stump 4.332. And, having eaten, settled to a tranquil sleep. 4.333. Dawn rose: they loosed the rope from the oak stump 4.334. After first laying a fire and offering incense 4.335. And crowned the stern, and sacrificed a heifer 4.336. Free of blemish, that had never known yoke or bull. 4.337. There’s a place where smooth-flowing Almo joins the Tiber 4.338. And the lesser flow loses its name in the greater: 4.339. There, a white-headed priest in purple robe 4.340. Washed the Lady, and sacred relics, in Almo’s water. 4.341. The attendants howled, and the mad flutes blew 4.342. And soft hands beat at the bull’s-hide drums. 4.343. Claudia walked in front with a joyful face 4.344. Her chastity proven by the goddess’s testimony: 4.951. For Vesta, and the third part that’s left, Caesar occupies. 4.952. Long live the laurels of the Palatine: long live that house 4.953. Decked with branches of oak: one place holds three eternal gods.
7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.557-1.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31, 2.31.3-2.31.8 (1st cent. BCE

10. Strabo, Geography, 13.1.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13.1.54. From Scepsis came the Socratic philosophers Erastus and Coriscus and Neleus the son of Coriscus, this last a man who not only was a pupil of Aristotle and Theophrastus, but also inherited the library of Theophrastus, which included that of Aristotle. At any rate, Aristotle bequeathed his own library to Theophrastus, to whom he also left his school; and he is the first man, so far as I know, to have collected books and to have taught the kings in Egypt how to arrange a library. Theophrastus bequeathed it to Neleus; and Neleus took it to Scepsis and bequeathed it to his heirs, ordinary people, who kept the books locked up and not even carefully stored. But when they heard bow zealously the Attalic kings to whom the city was subject were searching for books to build up the library in Pergamum, they hid their books underground in a kind of trench. But much later, when the books had been damaged by moisture and moths, their descendants sold them to Apellicon of Teos for a large sum of money, both the books of Aristotle and those of Theophrastus. But Apellicon was a bibliophile rather than a philosopher; and therefore, seeking a restoration of the parts that had been eaten through, he made new copies of the text, filling up the gaps incorrectly, and published the books full of errors. The result was that the earlier school of Peripatetics who came after Theophrastus had no books at all, with the exception of only a few, mostly exoteric works, and were therefore able to philosophize about nothing in a practical way, but only to talk bombast about commonplace propositions, whereas the later school, from the time the books in question appeared, though better able to philosophise and Aristotelise, were forced to call most of their statements probabilities, because of the large number of errors. Rome also contributed much to this; for, immediately after the death of Apellicon, Sulla, who had captured Athens, carried off Apellicon's library to Rome, where Tyrannion the grammarian, who was fond of Aristotle, got it in his hands by paying court to the librarian, as did also certain booksellers who used bad copyists and would not collate the texts — a thing that also takes place in the case of the other books that are copied for selling, both here and at Alexandria. However, this is enough about these men.
11. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.720-8.723 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead
12. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 83 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 83 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.75, 13.83, 13.92, 33.147, 34.11-34.12, 34.36, 34.48, 34.59, 34.84, 35.26, 36.14, 36.24-36.25, 36.32, 37.11, 37.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, Cicero, 7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Plutarch, Lucullus, 39.2, 42.1-42.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Plutarch, Sulla, 26.1-26.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Suetonius, Augustus, 29.1, 29.3, 70.1-70.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Tacitus, Annals, 2.37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.37.  In addition, he gave monetary help to several senators; so that it was the more surprising when he treated the application of the young noble, Marcus Hortalus, with a superciliousness uncalled for in view of his clearly straitened circumstances. He was a grandson of the orator Hortensius; and the late Augustus, by the grant of a million sesterces, had induced him to marry and raise a family, in order to save his famous house from extinction. With his four sons, then, standing before the threshold of the Curia, he awaited his turn to speak; then, directing his gaze now to the portrait of Hortensius among the orators (the senate was meeting in the Palace), now to that of Augustus, he opened in the following manner:— "Conscript Fathers, these children whose number and tender age you see for yourselves, became mine not from any wish of my own, but because the emperor so advised, and because, at the same time, my ancestors had earned the right to a posterity. For to me, who in this changed world had been able to inherit nothing and acquire nothing, — not money, nor popularity, nor eloquence, that general birthright of our house, — to me it seemed enough if my slender means were neither a disgrace to myself nor a burden to my neighbour. At the command of the sovereign, I took a wife; and here you behold the stock of so many consuls, the offspring of so many dictators! I say it, not to awaken odium, but to woo compassion. Some day, Caesar, under your happy sway, they will wear whatever honours you have chosen to bestow: in the meantime, rescue from beggary the great-grandsons of Quintus Hortensius, the fosterlings of the deified Augustus!
20. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 49.15.5, 58.7.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

49.15.5.  But this was mere idle talk. The people at this time resolved that a house should be presented to Caesar at public expense; for he had made public property of the place on the Palatine which he had bought for the purpose of erecting a residence upon it, and had consecrated it to Apollo, after a thunderbolt had descended upon it. Hence they voted him the house and also protection from any insult by deed or word; 58.7.2.  (for he was wont to include himself in such sacrifices), a rope was discovered coiled about the neck of the statue. Again, there was the behaviour of a statue of Fortune, which had belonged, they say, to Tullius, one of the former kings of Rome, but was at this time kept by Sejanus at his house and was a source of great pride to him:
21. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.34.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.34.1. Before reaching Coroneia from Alalcomenae we come to the sanctuary of Itonian Athena. It is named after Itonius the son of Amphictyon, and here the Boeotians gather for their general assembly. In the temple are bronze images of Itonian Athena and Zeus; the artist was Agoracritus, pupil and loved one of Pheidias. In my time they dedicated too images of the Graces.
22. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 6.4 (2nd cent. CE

6.4. Under his guidance, they say, they went on to the sacred enclosure of Memnon, of whom Damis gives the following account. He says that he was the son of the Dawn, and that he did not meet his death in Troy, where indeed he never went; but that he died in Ethiopia after ruling the land for five generations. But his countrymen being the longest lived of men, still mourn him as a mere youth and deplore his untimely death. But the place in which his statue is set up resembles, they tell us, an ancient market-place, such as remain in cities that were long ago inhabited, and where we come on broken stumps and fragments of columns, and find traces of walls as well as seats and jambs of doors, and images of Hermes, some destroyed by the hand of man, others by that of time. Now this statue, says Damis, was turned towards the sunrise, and was that of a youth still unbearded; and it was made of a black stone, and the two feet were joined together after the style in which statues were made in the time of Daedalus; and the arms of the figure were perpendicular to the seat pressing upon it, for though the figure was still sitting it was represented in the very act of rising up. We hear much of this attitude of the statue, and of the expression of its eyes, and of how the lips seem about to speak; but they say that they had no opportunity of admiring these effects until they saw them realized; for when the sun's rays fell upon the statue, and this happened exactly at dawn, they could not restrain their admiration; for the lips spoke immediately the sun's ray touched them, and the eyes seemed to stand out and gleam against the light as do those of men who love to bask in the sun. Then they say they understood that the figure was of one in the act of rising and making obeisance to the sun, in the way those do who worship the powers above standing erect. They accordingly offered a sacrifice to the Sun of Ethiopia and to Memnon of the Dawn, for this the priests recommended them to do, explaining that one name was derived from the words signifying to burn and be warm [ 1] and the other from his mother. Having done this they set out upon camels for the home of the naked philosophers.
23. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 1.22.13 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

24. Servius, In Vergilii Bucolicon Librum, 4.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

25. Manilius, Astronomica, 4.254-4.256

26. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.81.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
a roman amateur Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
actium Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
aegyptus, sons of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
aelius sejanus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
aemilius paullus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
aemilius scaurus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
ajax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
alexander the great, his lamp stand Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
andronicus of rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
antony, marc Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
apelles, the goddess on one knee Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
apollo, and hyacinthus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
apollo Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
apotropaia Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
archermos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56, 238
aristotle Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
artemis, in temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
athena, athena polias Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
athenis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
athens Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
audience, theatrical Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
augustus, and alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
augustus, and apollo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
augustus, and the palatine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
augustus, his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
augustus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
avianius evander, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
blindness Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
bupalos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
cephisodotus, works in temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
cornelius sulla, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
curatores, mausolei Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
dactyliotheca, in the temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
dactyliotheca Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
danaos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
dionysus Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
encolpius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
euripides, bacchae Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
fortuna Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
gaze, of cult images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
gegania Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
horace, and realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
horace, carmen saeculare Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
hortensius hortalus, q., as collector Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
house, access to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
hylas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
jerusalem, temple treasures repatriated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
jerusalem Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
julius caesar, c., and the civil war Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
julius caesar, c., and the gallic war Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
julius caesar, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
justinian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
latona Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
lenaea vases Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
libraries, of apellicon the teian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
libraries Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
licinius lucullus, l., his villa at tusculum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
licinius lucullus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
lucilius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
madness, caused by statues gaze Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
manilius, astronomica Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
masks, theatrical Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
mentor Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
mithridates, his dactyliotheca Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
myron, works on palatine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
objects, inventory of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
objects, repatriation of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
olynthus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
palatine hill Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
parrhasius, his prometheus torments Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
petronius, and realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
place among ancient artists, his realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
pliny the elder, on realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
polyclitus, the doryphorus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
pompeius, sex., defeated at naulochus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
pompey the great, collects gems Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
pomponius secundus, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
power structures, imperial power Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
pythagoras Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
realism, and eithopoieia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 100
rome, arch of octavius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
rome, baths of caracalla Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
rome, forum of peace Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
rome, temple of apollo palatinus, portico of the danaids Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
rome, temple of apollo palatinus, triad represented on sorrento base Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
rome Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
scopas, works in temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
sempronius gracchus, ti. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
semproniusgracchus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
senses, solstice Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
sight, power of, of divine images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
sphinx Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
statues, and viewers Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
suetonius, divus augustus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
tacitus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
tarpeia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
theophrastus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
timotheus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 238
titus, and destruction of the temple Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
trees, citrus wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
tullius cicero, m., his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
tyrannion the grammarian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
vergil, his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
verres, c., his mania for collecting Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
vespasian, inventories neros greek plunder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 56
viewers' Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 176
vipsanius agrippa, m., purchases paintings from the cyzicans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
virgil Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218