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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.26


nanAmong the remaining colours which because of their high cost, as we said, are supplied by patrons, dark purple holds the first place. It is produced by dipping silversmiths' earth along with purple cloth and in like manner, the earth absorbing the colour more quickly than the wool. The best is that which being the first formed in the boiling cauldron becomes saturated with the dyes in their primary state, and the next best produced when white earth is added to the same liquor after the first has been removed; and every time this is done the quality deteriorates, the liquid becoming more diluted at each stage. The reason why the dark purple of Pozzuoli is more highly praised than that of Tyre or Gaetulia or Laconia, places which produce the most costly purples, is that it combines most easily with hysginum and madder which cannot help absorbing it. The cheapest comes from Canusium. The price is from one to thirty denarii per lb. Painters using it put a coat of sandyx underneath and then add a coat of dark purple mixed with egg, and so produce the brilliance of cinnabar; if they wish instead to produce the glow of purple, they lay a coat of blue underneath, and then cover this with dark purple mixed with egg.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Cicero, De Oratore, 3.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.10. Iam M. Antoni in eis ipsis rostris, in quibus ille rem publicam constantissime consul defenderat quaeque censor imperatoriis manubiis ornarat, positum caput illud fuit, a quo erant multorum civium capita servata; neque vero longe ab eo C. Iuli caput hospitis Etrusci scelere proditum cum L. Iuli fratris capite iacuit, ut ille, qui haec non vidit, et vixisse cum re publica pariter et cum illa simul exstinctus esse videatur. Neque enim propinquum suum, maximi animi virum, P. Crassum, suapte interfectum manu neque conlegae sui, pontificis maximi, sanguine simulacrum Vestae respersum esse vidit; cui maerori, qua mente ille in patriam fuit, etiam C. Carbonis, inimicissimi hominis, eodem illo die mors fuisset nefaria;
2. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Philippicae, 9.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.59.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Livy, History, 42.20.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 1.261-1.262 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.261. And how the treacherous keeper, Tarpeia, bribed with bracelets 1.262. Led the silent Sabines to the heights of the citadel.
7. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.31-3.1.32, 3.1.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Strabo, Geography, 13.1.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13.1.54. From Scepsis came the Socratic philosophers Erastus and Coriscus and Neleus the son of Coriscus, this last a man who not only was a pupil of Aristotle and Theophrastus, but also inherited the library of Theophrastus, which included that of Aristotle. At any rate, Aristotle bequeathed his own library to Theophrastus, to whom he also left his school; and he is the first man, so far as I know, to have collected books and to have taught the kings in Egypt how to arrange a library. Theophrastus bequeathed it to Neleus; and Neleus took it to Scepsis and bequeathed it to his heirs, ordinary people, who kept the books locked up and not even carefully stored. But when they heard bow zealously the Attalic kings to whom the city was subject were searching for books to build up the library in Pergamum, they hid their books underground in a kind of trench. But much later, when the books had been damaged by moisture and moths, their descendants sold them to Apellicon of Teos for a large sum of money, both the books of Aristotle and those of Theophrastus. But Apellicon was a bibliophile rather than a philosopher; and therefore, seeking a restoration of the parts that had been eaten through, he made new copies of the text, filling up the gaps incorrectly, and published the books full of errors. The result was that the earlier school of Peripatetics who came after Theophrastus had no books at all, with the exception of only a few, mostly exoteric works, and were therefore able to philosophize about nothing in a practical way, but only to talk bombast about commonplace propositions, whereas the later school, from the time the books in question appeared, though better able to philosophise and Aristotelise, were forced to call most of their statements probabilities, because of the large number of errors. Rome also contributed much to this; for, immediately after the death of Apellicon, Sulla, who had captured Athens, carried off Apellicon's library to Rome, where Tyrannion the grammarian, who was fond of Aristotle, got it in his hands by paying court to the librarian, as did also certain booksellers who used bad copyists and would not collate the texts — a thing that also takes place in the case of the other books that are copied for selling, both here and at Alexandria. However, this is enough about these men.
9. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.5.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Appian, Civil Wars, 5.130 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE

12. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.75, 13.83, 13.92, 33.147, 34.11-34.12, 34.55, 34.57-34.60, 34.62, 35.2-35.13, 35.15, 35.18, 35.20, 35.22-35.25, 35.27-35.28, 35.31, 35.34, 35.44, 35.46, 35.49, 35.51-35.52, 35.57-35.58, 35.60, 35.64-35.68, 35.70, 35.72, 35.74, 35.76-35.77, 35.81-35.83, 35.85-35.86, 35.88, 35.91, 35.93, 35.95, 35.97-35.98, 35.100, 35.102-35.103, 35.108-35.110, 35.114, 35.116-35.117, 35.119-35.120, 35.127-35.128, 35.130-35.133, 35.136, 35.139, 35.144, 35.157, 36.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, Lucullus, 42.1-42.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Plutarch, Sulla, 26.1-26.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Plutarch, Tiberius And Gaius Gracchus, 13.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 12.10.3-12.10.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.10.3.  The first great painters, whose works deserve inspection for something more than their mere antiquity, are said to have been Polygnotus and Aglaophon, whose simple colouring has still such enthusiastic admirers that they prefer these almost primitive works, which may be regarded as the first foundations of the art that was to be, over the works of the greatest of their successors, their motive being, in my opinion, an ostentatious desire to seem persons of superior taste. 12.10.4.  Later Zeuxis and Parrhasius contributed much to the progress of painting. These artists were separated by no great distance of time, since both flourished about the period of the Peloponnesian war; for example, Xenophon has preserved a conversation between Socrates and Parrhasius. The first-mentioned seems to have discovered the method of representing light and shade, while the latter is said to have devoted special attention to the treatment of line. 12.10.5.  For Zeuxis emphasised the limbs of the human body, thinking thereby to add dignity and grandeur to his style: it is generally supposed that in this he followed the example of Homer, who likes to represent even his female characters as being of heroic mould. Parrhasius, on the other hand, was so fine a draughtsman that he has been styled the law-giver of his art, on the ground that all other artists take his representations of gods and heroes as models, as though no other course were possible. 12.10.6.  It was, however, from about the period of the reign of Philip down to that of the successors of Alexander that painting flourished more especially, although the different artists are distinguished for different excellences. Proto­genes, for example, was renowned for accuracy, Pamphilus and Melanthius for soundness of taste, Antiphilus for facility, Theon of Samos for his depiction of imaginary scenes, known as φαντασίαι, and Apelles for genius and grace, in the latter of which qualities he took especial pride. Euphranor, on the other hand, was admired on the ground that, while he ranked with the most eminent masters of other arts, he at the same time achieved a marvellous skill in the arts of sculpture and painting. 12.10.7.  The same differences exist between sculptors. The art of Callon and Hegesias is somewhat rude and recalls the Etruscans, but the work of Calamis has already begun to be less stiff, while Myron's statues show a greater form than had been achieved by the artists just mentioned. Polyclitus surpassed all others for care and grace, but although the majority of critics account him as the greatest of sculptors, to avoid making him faultless they express the opinion that his work is lacking in grandeur. 12.10.8.  For while he gave the human form an ideal grace, he is thought to have been less successful in representing the dignity of the gods. He is further alleged to have shrunken from representing persons of maturer years, and to have ventured on nothing more difficult than a smooth and beardless face. But the qualities lacking in Polyclitus are allowed to have been possessed by Phidias and Alcamenes. 12.10.9.  On the other hand, Phidias is regarded as more gifted in his representation of gods station of men, and indeed for chryselephantine statues he is without a peer, as he would in truth be, even if he had produced nothing in this material beyond his Minerva at Athens and his Jupiter at Olympia in Elis, whose beauty is such that it is said to have added something even to the awe with which the god was already regarded: so perfectly did the majesty of the work give the impression of godhead. Lysippus and Praxiteles are asserted to be supreme as regards faithfulness to nature. For Demetrius is blamed for carrying realism too far, and is less concerned about the beauty than the truth of his work.
20. Tacitus, Annals, 2.37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.37.  In addition, he gave monetary help to several senators; so that it was the more surprising when he treated the application of the young noble, Marcus Hortalus, with a superciliousness uncalled for in view of his clearly straitened circumstances. He was a grandson of the orator Hortensius; and the late Augustus, by the grant of a million sesterces, had induced him to marry and raise a family, in order to save his famous house from extinction. With his four sons, then, standing before the threshold of the Curia, he awaited his turn to speak; then, directing his gaze now to the portrait of Hortensius among the orators (the senate was meeting in the Palace), now to that of Augustus, he opened in the following manner:— "Conscript Fathers, these children whose number and tender age you see for yourselves, became mine not from any wish of my own, but because the emperor so advised, and because, at the same time, my ancestors had earned the right to a posterity. For to me, who in this changed world had been able to inherit nothing and acquire nothing, — not money, nor popularity, nor eloquence, that general birthright of our house, — to me it seemed enough if my slender means were neither a disgrace to myself nor a burden to my neighbour. At the command of the sovereign, I took a wife; and here you behold the stock of so many consuls, the offspring of so many dictators! I say it, not to awaken odium, but to woo compassion. Some day, Caesar, under your happy sway, they will wear whatever honours you have chosen to bestow: in the meantime, rescue from beggary the great-grandsons of Quintus Hortensius, the fosterlings of the deified Augustus!
21. Tacitus, Dialogus De Oratoribus, 28.5-28.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.9.6, 58.7.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

55.9.6.  He made the journey as a private citizen, though he exercised his authority by compelling the Parians to sell him the statue of Vesta, in order that it might be placed in the temple of Concord; and when he reached Rhodes, he refrained from haughty conduct in both word and deed. 58.7.2.  (for he was wont to include himself in such sacrifices), a rope was discovered coiled about the neck of the statue. Again, there was the behaviour of a statue of Fortune, which had belonged, they say, to Tullius, one of the former kings of Rome, but was at this time kept by Sejanus at his house and was a source of great pride to him:
23. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.14.3, 1.38.7, 4.33.5, 5.25.9, 5.27.3, 8.46.1-8.46.5, 9.27.3, 10.7.1, 10.18.5, 10.32.13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.14.3. Some extant verses of Musaeus, if indeed they are to be included among his works, say that Triptolemus was the son of Oceanus and Earth; while those ascribed to Orpheus (though in my opinion the received authorship is again incorrect) say that Eubuleus and Triptolemus were sons of Dysaules, and that because they gave Demeter information about her daughter the sowing of seed was her reward to them. But Choerilus, an Athenian, who wrote a play called Alope, says that Cercyon and Triptolemus were brothers, that their mother was the daughter of Amphictyon, while the father of Triptolemus was Rarus, of Cercyon, Poseidon. After I had intended to go further into this story, and to describe the contents of the sanctuary at Athens, called the Eleusinium, I was stayed by a vision in a dream. I shall therefore turn to those things it is lawful to write of to all men. 1.38.7. My dream forbade the description of the things within the wall of the sanctuary, and the uninitiated are of course not permitted to learn that which they are prevented from seeing. The hero Eleusis, after whom the city is named, some assert to be a son of Hermes and of Daeira, daughter of Ocean; there are poets, however, who have made Ogygus father of Eleusis . Ancient legends, deprived of the help of poetry, have given rise to many fictions, especially concerning the pedigrees of heroes. 4.33.5. I may not reveal the rites of the Great Goddesses, for it is their mysteries which they celebrate in the Carnasian grove, and I regard them as second only to the Eleusinian in sanctity. But my dream did not prevent me from making known to all that the brazen urn, discovered by the Argive general, and the bones of Eurytus the son of Melaneus were kept here. A river Charadrus flows past the grove; 5.25.9. but Agamemnon's statue is the only one of the eight to have his name inscribed upon it; the writing is from right to left. The figure with the cock emblazoned on the shield is Idomeneus the descendant of Minos. The story goes that Idomeneus was descended from the Sun, the father of Pasiphae, and that the cock is sacred to the Sun and proclaims when he is about to rise. 5.27.3. This is the horse in which is, say the Eleans, the hippomanes (what maddens horses). It is plain to all that the quality of the horse is the result of magic skill. It is much inferior in size and beauty to all the horses standing within the Altis. Moreover, its tail has been cut off which makes the figure uglier still. But male horses, not only in spring but on any day, are at heat towards it. 8.46.1. The ancient image of Athena Alea, and with it the tusks of the Calydonian boar, were carried away by the Roman emperor Augustus after his defeat of Antonius and his allies, among whom were all the Arcadians except the Mantineans. 8.46.2. It is clear that Augustus was not the first to carry away from the vanquished votive offerings and images of gods, but was only following an old precedent. For when Troy was taken and the Greeks were dividing up the spoils, Sthenelus the son of Capaneus was given the wooden image of Zeus Herceius (of the Courtyard); and many years later, when Dorians were migrating to Sicily, Antiphemus the founder of Gela, after the sack of Omphace, a town of the Sicanians, removed to Gela an image made by Daedalus. 8.46.3. Xerxes, too, the son of Dareius, the king of Persia, apart from the spoil he carried away from the city of Athens, took besides, as we know, from Brauron the image of Brauronian Artemis, and furthermore, accusing the Milesians of cowardice in a naval engagement against the Athenians in Greek waters, carried away from them the bronze Apollo at Branchidae . This it was to be the lot of Seleucus afterwards to restore to the Milesians, but the Argives down to the present still retain the images they took from Tiryns ; one, a wooden image, is by the Hera, the other is kept in the sanctuary of Lycian Apollo. 8.46.4. Again, the people of Cyzicus, compelling the people of Proconnesus by war to live at Cyzicus, took away from Proconnesus an image of Mother Dindymene. The image is of gold, and its face is made of hippopotamus teeth instead of ivory. So the emperor Augustus only followed a custom in vogue among the Greeks and barbarians from of old. The image of Athena Alea at Rome is as you enter the Forum made by Augustus. 8.46.5. Here then it has been set up, made throughout of ivory, the work of Endoeus. Those in charge of the curiosities say that one of the boar's tusks has broken off; the remaining one is kept in the gardens of the emperor, in a sanctuary of Dionysus, and is about half a fathom long. 9.27.3. Sappho of Lesbos wrote many poems about Love, but they are not consistent. Later on Lysippus made a bronze Love for the Thespians, and previously Praxiteles one of Pentelic marble. The story of Phryne and the trick she played on Praxiteles I have related in another place. See Paus. 1.20.1 . The first to remove the image of Love, it is said, was Gaius the Roman Emperor; Claudius, they say, sent it back to Thespiae, but Nero carried it away a second time. 10.7.1. It seems that from the beginning the sanctuary at Delphi has been plotted against by a vast number of men. Attacks were made against it by this Euboean pirate, and years afterwards by the Phlegyan nation; furthermore by Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, by a portion of the army of Xerxes, by the Phocian chieftains, whose attacks on the wealth of the god were the longest and fiercest, and by the Gallic invaders. It was fated too that Delphi was to suffer from the universal irreverence of Nero, who robbed Apollo of five hundred bronze statues, some of gods, some of men. 10.18.5. The men of Orneae in Argolis, when hard pressed in war by the Sicyonians, vowed to Apollo that, if they should drive the host of the Sicyonians out of their native land, they would organize a daily procession in his honor at Delphi, and sacrifice victims of a certain kind and of a certain number. Well, they conquered the Sicyonians in battle. But finding the daily fulfillment of their vow a great expense and a still greater trouble, they devised the trick of dedicating to the god bronze figures representing a sacrifice and a procession. 10.32.13. About forty stades distant from Asclepius is a precinct and shrine sacred to Isis, the holiest of all those made by the Greeks for the Egyptian goddess. For the Tithoreans think it wrong to dwell round about it, and no one may enter the shrine except those whom Isis herself has honored by inviting them in dreams. The same rule is observed in the cities above the Maeander by the gods of the lower world; for to all whom they wish to enter their shrines they send visions seen in dreams.
24. Epigraphy, Stratonikeia, 511



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius sejanus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
aemilius paullus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67, 130
agrippa, marcus vipsanius Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 221, 222
ajax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
alexander the great, and apelles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
andronicus of rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
antium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
antonius, m., triumphs over cilician pirates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
antony, marc Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
arcesilaus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
aristotle Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
asia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
athena alea at tegea Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
attitudes, roman Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
auctoritas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
augustodunum Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 221
augustus, and marc antony Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
augustus, column dedicated to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
augustus, conquest of egypt Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
augustus, finishes the forum of julius caesar Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
augustus, his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
augustus, victory at actium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
augustus Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 221; Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
avianius evander, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
caecilia, gaia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
columnae rostratae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 67
cornelius sulla, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
cubiculum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
cult images, danger of Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
damasippus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
deity, powers of Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
delphi, offering of the orneatai Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
dickens, charles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
domitian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
dreams, and images Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
edwards, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
encolpius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
fortuna Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
gauls, besiege the capitoline Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
gauls, sack rome Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
gauls, torques used as trophies Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
gegania Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
herculaneum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
hercules Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
house, access to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
identity, xv–xvi, of prototype and representation Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
ilium Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
image, and ritual Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
image, as ritual Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
image, identified with prototype Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
jerusalem Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
jews Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
julius caesar, c., and the civil war Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
julius caesar, c., and the gallic war Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
julius caesar, c., public collection in temple of venus genetrix Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
julius caesar, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67, 226
julius caesar, gaius Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
lagina Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
libraries, of apellicon the teian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
libraries Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
licinius lucullus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 67
lucilius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
lysippus, and alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
maenius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
magic Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
martial, on realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
mentor Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
mimesis Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
miracles, pagan Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
offering, art work as Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
orneatai, offering at delphi Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
palladium, as talisman Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
parrhasius, and realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
pausanias, and ritual-centered visuality Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
pergamum, neros attempted looting of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
pergamum Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
philippi Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
pinacothecae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
place among ancient artists, his realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
pliny the elder, on public art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
pliny the elder, on realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
pliny the elder Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 221
pompeii, house of the vettii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
pomponius secundus, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
possis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
preference for realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
publicani Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
punic wars Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
res gestae' Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
ritual, image and Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
ritual, image as Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 42
rome, forum of julius caesar Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 226
rome, gauls besiege Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
rome, imperial fora Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
rome, palatine hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 130
rome, roma quadrata Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, temple of venus genetrix, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
rome, temple of venus genetrix Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, theatre of pompey Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
rostra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
rostrum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
sempronius gracchus, ti. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 67
semproniusgracchus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 67
similitudo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
sthenius of thermae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
tarpeia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
theophrastus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
thompson, m. l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
timomachus of byzantium, his ajax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
timomachus of byzantium, his medea Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 226
trees, citrus wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
trimalchio, his house Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
tullius cicero, m., his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
tyrannion the grammarian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
valerius flaccus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 130
valerius publicola, p., as collector Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
valerius publicola, p., on realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99
vergil, his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
verres, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
vipsania polla Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 221
vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 226
vipsanius agrippa, m., purchases paintings from the cyzicans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
vitruvius, on houses Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
vitruvius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
zeuxis, and realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 99