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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.80
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 8.83-8.88 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Polybius, Histories, 6.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6.53. 1.  Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the so‑called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2.  Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3.  As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4.  Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5.  This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6.  On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7.  These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8.  They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9.  and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10.  For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this?
3. Asconius Pedianus Quintus, In Milonianam, 32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Sallust, Iugurtha, 4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.6-35.11, 35.66, 35.131, 35.144 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Tacitus, Agricola, 46 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Tacitus, Annals, 1.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.8.  The only business which he allowed to be discussed at the first meeting of the senate was the funeral of Augustus. The will, brought in by the Vestal Virgins, specified Tiberius and Livia as heirs, Livia to be adopted into the Julian family and the Augustan name. As legatees in the second degree he mentioned his grandchildren and great-grandchildren; in the third place, the prominent nobles — an ostentatious bid for the applause of posterity, as he detested most of them. His bequests were not above the ordinary civic scale, except that he left 43,500,000 sesterces to the nation and the populace, a thousand to every man in the praetorian guards, five hundred to each in the urban troops, and three hundred to all legionaries or members of the Roman cohorts. The question of the last honours was then debated. The two regarded as the most striking were due to Asinius Gallus and Lucius Arruntius — the former proposing that the funeral train should pass under a triumphal gateway; the latter, that the dead should be preceded by the titles of all laws which he had carried and the names of all peoples whom he had subdued. In addition, Valerius Messalla suggested that the oath of allegiance to Tiberius should be renewed annually. To a query from Tiberius, whether that expression of opinion came at his dictation, he retorted — it was the one form of flattery still left — that he had spoken of his own accord, and, when public interests were in question, he would (even at the risk of giving offence) use no man's judgment but his own. The senate clamoured for the body to be carried to the pyre on the shoulders of the Fathers. The Caesar, with haughty moderation, excused them from that duty, and warned the people by edict not to repeat the enthusiastic excesses which on a former day had marred the funeral of the deified Julius, by desiring Augustus to be cremated in the Forum rather than in the Field of Mars, his appointed resting-place. On the day of the ceremony, the troops were drawn up as though on guard, amid the jeers of those who had seen with their eyes, or whose fathers had declared to them, that day of still novel servitude and freedom disastrously re-wooed, when the killing of the dictator Caesar to some had seemed the worst, and to others the fairest, of high exploits:— "And now an aged prince, a veteran potentate, who had seen to it that not even his heirs should lack for means to coerce their country, must needs have military protection to ensure a peaceable burial!
8. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.8.2, 55.9.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

55.8.2.  After assigning to himself the duty of repairing the temple of Concord, in order that he might inscribe upon it his own name and that of Drusus, he celebrated his triumph, and in company with his mother dedicated the precinct called the precinct of Livia. He gave a banquet to the senate on the Capitol, and she gave one on her own account to the women somewhere or other. 55.9.6.  He made the journey as a private citizen, though he exercised his authority by compelling the Parians to sell him the statue of Vesta, in order that it might be placed in the temple of Concord; and when he reached Rhodes, he refrained from haughty conduct in both word and deed.
9. Manilius, Astronomica, 1.7-1.10, 1.247-1.254, 2.60-2.83, 3.48-3.55



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, athens, multiple cult statues of athena on Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
argos, cult statues of hera at Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
argos, scissors, hera of argos depicted with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
asinius pollio Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
athena hygieia Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
athena polias Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
augustus, his funeral Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
barberini togatus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
baton, his apollo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
baton, his juno Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
clodius pulcher, p., his funeral Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
danaans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
double axe Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
euphranor, latona, apollo, and artemis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
frickenhaus, august Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
funerals, and virtus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
funerals Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
hagia triada sarcophagus Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
herington, c. j. Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
house, imagines in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
imagines, in funerals Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, and memory Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, and virtus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, veneration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
julius caesar, c., his funeral Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
jung, h. Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
kroll, j. h. Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
levi, doro Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
libraries Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
linear b Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
mos maiorum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
niceratus, his aesculapius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
niceratus, his hygeia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
nicias, his liber pater Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
nilsson, martin, on athena Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
panathenaia Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
patrocles altar Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
phoenicians Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
pisistratus and pisistratids Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
piston, his mars Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
piston, his mercury Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
polybius, on roman funerals Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
polycrates of samos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
pomponius atticus, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
pyrrhus (bronze smith) Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, and euphranor Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, and livia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, and tiberius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, cosmic significance of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, neptune and venus absent Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, cult statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
sallust, on imagines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
sempronius gracchus, ti. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
semproniusgracchus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
shapiro, alan Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 379
sthennis, works in temple of concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
tacitus, on imagines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
theodorus, his cassandra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
trojans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
valerius publicola, p., his hebdomades Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
vesta, parian statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
viewers, elite versus non-elite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
viewers, shared values of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
virtus, and memory' Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
zeuxis, his marsyas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268