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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.30


nanEgyptian sori is most highly commended, being far superior to that of Cyprus and Spain and Africa, although some people think that Cyprus sori is more useful for treatment of the eyes; but whatever its provenance the best is that which has the most pungent odour, and which when ground up takes a greasy, black colour and becomes spongy. It is a substance that goes against the stomach so violently that with some people the mere smell of it causes vomiting. This is a description of the sori of Egypt. That from other sources when ground up turns a bright colour like misy, and it is harder; however, if it is held in the cavities and used plentifully as a mouthwash it is good for toothache and for serious and creeping ulcers of the mouth. It is burnt on charcoal, like chalcitis.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3. Quam vero Graecia coloniam misit in Aeoliam, Ioniam, Asiam, Siciliam, Italiam sine Pythio aut Dodonaeo aut Hammonis oraculo? aut quod bellum susceptum ab ea sine consilio deorum est? Nec unum genus est divinationis publice privatimque celebratum. Nam, ut omittam ceteros populos, noster quam multa genera conplexus est! Principio huius urbis parens Romulus non solum auspicato urbem condidisse, sed ipse etiam optumus augur fuisse traditur. Deinde auguribus et reliqui reges usi, et exactis regibus nihil publice sine auspiciis nec domi nec militiae gerebatur. Cumque magna vis videretur esse et inpetriendis consulendisque rebus et monstris interpretandis ac procurandis in haruspicum disciplina, omnem hanc ex Etruria scientiam adhibebant, ne genus esset ullum divinationis, quod neglectum ab iis videretur. 1.3. And, indeed, what colony did Greece ever send into Aeolia, Ionia, Asia, Sicily, or Italy without consulting the Pythian or Dodonian oracle, or that of Jupiter Hammon? Or what war did she ever undertake without first seeking the counsel of the gods? [2] Nor is it only one single mode of divination that has been employed in public and in private. For, to say nothing of other nations, how many our own people have embraced! In the first place, according to tradition, Romulus, the father of this City, not only founded it in obedience to the auspices, but was himself a most skilful augur. Next, the other Roman kings employed augurs; and, again, after the expulsion of the kings, no public business was ever transacted at home or abroad without first taking the auspices. Furthermore, since our forefathers believed that the soothsayers art had great efficacy in seeking for omens and advice, as well as in cases where prodigies were to be interpreted and their effects averted, they gradually introduced that art in its entirety from Etruria, lest it should appear that any kind of divination had been disregarded by them. 1.3. Therefore Ateius, by his announcement, did not create the cause of the disaster; but having observed the sign he simply advised Crassus what the result would be if the warning was ignored. It follows, then, that the announcement by Ateius of the unfavourable augury had no effect; or if it did, as Appius thinks, then the sin is not in him who gave the warning, but in him who disregarded it.[17] And whence, pray, did you augurs derive that staff, which is the most conspicuous mark of your priestly office? It is the very one, indeed with which Romulus marked out the quarter for taking observations when he founded the city. Now this staffe is a crooked wand, slightly curved at the top, and, because of its resemblance to a trumpet, derives its name from the Latin word meaning the trumpet with which the battle-charge is sounded. It was placed in the temple of the Salii on the Palatine hill and, though the temple was burned, the staff was found uninjured.
2. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Letters, 1.6, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, In Pisonem, 6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.176, 2.4.79 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Cicero, Philippicae, 9.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Cicero, Pro Sestio, 121 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Livy, History, 1.16.3, 1.45.4-1.45.5, 23.30.13, 23.31.9, 42.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Livy, Per., 116 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31.12-2.31.16 (1st cent. BCE

13. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.704 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.704. of game and contest, summoned to his side
14. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.5.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15. Appian, Civil Wars, 1.26, 2.106, 2.144 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE

17. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 33.112, 34.20-34.24, 34.26-34.29, 34.31-34.32, 35.4-35.5, 36.27-36.29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Plutarch, Cicero, 23.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Suetonius, Iulius, 76.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 44.4.4, 60.25.2-60.25.3, 66.15.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

44.4.4.  In addition to these remarkable privileges they named him father of his country, stamped this title on the coinage, voted to celebrate his birthday by public sacrifice, ordered that he should have a statue in the cities and in all the temples of Rome 60.25.2.  Accordingly, as in earlier times, one of the praetors, one of the tribunes, and one of each of the other groups of officials recited the oaths for their colleagues. This practice was followed for several years. In view of the fact that the city was becoming filled with a great multitude of images (for any who wished were free to have their likenesses appear in public in a painting or in bronze or marble) 60.25.3.  Claudius removed most of them elsewhere and for the future forbade that any private citizen should be allowed to follow the practice, except by permission of the senate or unless he should have built or repaired some public work; for he permitted such persons and their relatives to have their images set up in the places in question.
22. Censorinus, De Die Natali, 23.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Augustine, The City of God, 3.17 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

3.17. After this, when their fears were gradually diminished - not because the wars ceased, but because they were not so furious - that period in which things were ordered with justice and moderation drew to an end, and there followed that state of matters which Sallust thus briefly sketches: Then began the patricians to oppress the people as slaves, to condemn them to death or scourging, as the kings had done, to drive them from their holdings, and to tyrannize over those who had no property to lose. The people, overwhelmed by these oppressive measures, and most of all by usury, and obliged to contribute both money and personal service to the constant wars, at length took arms and seceded to Mount Aventine and Mount Sacer, and thus secured for themselves tribunes and protective laws. But it was only the second Punic war that put an end on both sides to discord and strife. But why should I spend time in writing such things, or make others spend it in reading them? Let the terse summary of Sallust suffice to intimate the misery of the republic through all that long period till the second Punic war - how it was distracted from without by unceasing wars, and torn with civil broils and dissensions. So that those victories they boast were not the substantial joys of the happy, but the empty comforts of wretched men, and seductive incitements to turbulent men to concoct disasters upon disasters. And let not the good and prudent Romans be angry at our saying this; and indeed we need neither deprecate nor denounce their anger, for we know they will harbor none. For we speak no more severely than their own authors, and much less elaborately and strikingly; yet they diligently read these authors, and compel their children to learn them. But they who are angry, what would they do to me were I to say what Sallust says? Frequent mobs, seditions, and at last civil wars, became common, while a few leading men on whom the masses were dependent, affected supreme power under the seemly pretence of seeking the good of senate and people; citizens were judged good or bad without reference to their loyalty to the republic (for all were equally corrupt); but the wealthy and dangerously powerful were esteemed good citizens, because they maintained the existing state of things. Now, if those historians judged that an honorable freedom of speech required that they should not be silent regarding the blemishes of their own state, which they have in many places loudly applauded in their ignorance of that other and true city in which citizenship is an everlasting dignity; what does it become us to do, whose liberty ought to be so much greater, as our hope in God is better and more assured, when they impute to our Christ the calamities of this age, in order that men of the less instructed and weaker sort may be alienated from that city in which alone eternal and blessed life can be enjoyed? Nor do we utter against their gods anything more horrible than their own authors do, whom they read and circulate. For, indeed, all that we have said we have derived from them, and there is much more to say of a worse kind which we are unable to say. Where, then, were those gods who are supposed to be justly worshipped for the slender and delusive prosperity of this world, when the Romans, who were seduced to their service by lying wiles, were harassed by such calamities? Where were they when Valerius the consul was killed while defending the Capitol, that had been fired by exiles and slaves? He was himself better able to defend the temple of Jupiter, than that crowd of divinities with their most high and mighty king, whose temple he came to the rescue of were able to defend him. Where were they when the city, worn out with unceasing seditions, was waiting in some kind of calm for the return of the ambassadors who had been sent to Athens to borrow laws, and was desolated by dreadful famine and pestilence? Where were they when the people, again distressed with famine, created for the first time a prefect of the market; and when Spurius Melius, who, as the famine increased, distributed grain to the famishing masses, was accused of aspiring to royalty, and at the instance of this same prefect, and on the authority of the superannuated dictator L. Quintius, was put to death by Quintus Servilius, master of the horse - an event which occasioned a serious and dangerous riot? Where were they when that very severe pestilence visited Rome, on account of which the people, after long and wearisome and useless supplications of the helpless gods, conceived the idea of celebrating Lectisternia, which had never been done before; that is to say, they set couches in honor of the gods, which accounts for the name of this sacred rite, or rather sacrilege? Where were they when, during ten successive years of reverses, the Roman army suffered frequent and great losses among the Veians and would have been destroyed but for the succor of Furius Camillus, who was afterwards banished by an ungrateful country? Where were they when the Gauls took sacked, burned, and desolated Rome? Where were they when that memorable pestilence wrought such destruction, in which Furius Camillus too perished, who first defended the ungrateful republic from the Veians, and afterwards saved it from the Gauls? Nay, during this plague, they introduced a new pestilence of scenic entertainments, which spread its more fatal contagion, not to the bodies, but the morals of the Romans? Where were they when another frightful pestilence visited the city - I mean the poisonings imputed to an incredible number of noble Roman matrons, whose characters were infected with a disease more fatal than any plague? Or when both consuls at the head of the army were beset by the Samnites in the Caudine Forks, and forced to strike a shameful treaty, 600 Roman knights being kept as hostages; while the troops, having laid down their arms, and being stripped of everything, were made to pass under the yoke with one garment each? Or when, in the midst of a serious pestilence, lightning struck the Roman camp and killed many? Or when Rome was driven, by the violence of another intolerable plague, to send to Epidaurus for Æsculapius as a god of medicine; since the frequent adulteries of Jupiter in his youth had not perhaps left this king of all who so long reigned in the Capitol, any leisure for the study of medicine? Or when, at one time, the Lucanians, Brutians, Samnites, Tuscans, and Senonian Gauls conspired against Rome, and first slew her ambassadors, then overthrew an army under the pr tor, putting to the sword 13,000 men, besides the commander and seven tribunes? Or when the people, after the serious and long-continued disturbances at Rome, at last plundered the city and withdrew to Janiculus; a danger so grave, that Hortensius was created dictator, - an office which they had recourse to only in extreme emergencies; and he, having brought back the people, died while yet he retained his office - an event without precedent in the case of any dictator, and which was a shame to those gods who had now Æsculapius among them? At that time, indeed, so many wars were everywhere engaged in, that through scarcity of soldiers they enrolled for military service the proletarii, who received this name, because, being too poor to equip for military service, they had leisure to beget offspring. Pyrrhus, king of Greece, and at that time of widespread renown, was invited by the Tarentines to enlist himself against Rome. It was to him that Apollo, when consulted regarding the issue of his enterprise, uttered with some pleasantry so ambiguous an oracle, that whichever alternative happened, the god himself should be counted divine. For he so worded the oracle that whether Pyrrhus was conquered by the Romans, or the Romans by Pyrrhus, the soothsaying god would securely await the issue. And then what frightful massacres of both armies ensued! Yet Pyrrhus remained conqueror, and would have been able now to proclaim Apollo a true diviner, as he understood the oracle, had not the Romans been the conquerors in the next engagement. And while such disastrous wars were being waged, a terrible disease broke out among the women. For the pregt women died before delivery. And Æsculapius, I fancy, excused himself in this matter on the ground that he professed to be arch-physician, not midwife. Cattle, too, similarly perished; so that it was believed that the whole race of animals was destined to become extinct. Then what shall I say of that memorable winter in which the weather was so incredibly severe, that in the Forum frightfully deep snow lay for forty days together, and the Tiber was frozen? Had such things happened in our time, what accusations we should have heard from our enemies! And that other great pestilence, which raged so long and carried off so many; what shall I say of it? Spite of all the drugs of Æsculapius, it only grew worse in its second year, till at last recourse was had to the Sibylline books - a kind of oracle which, as Cicero says in his De Divinatione, owes significance to its interpreters, who make doubtful conjectures as they can or as they wish. In this instance, the cause of the plague was said to be that so many temples had been used as private residences. And thus Æsculapius for the present escaped the charge of either ignominious negligence or want of skill. But why were so many allowed to occupy sacred tenements without interference, unless because supplication had long been addressed in vain to such a crowd of gods, and so by degrees the sacred places were deserted of worshippers, and being thus vacant, could without offense be put at least to some human uses? And the temples, which were at that time laboriously recognized and restored that the plague might be stayed, fell afterwards into disuse, and were again devoted to the same human uses. Had they not thus lapsed into obscurity, it could not have been pointed to as proof of Varro's great erudition, that in his work on sacred places he cites so many that were unknown. Meanwhile, the restoration of the temples procured no cure of the plague, but only a fine excuse for the gods.
24. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 19.12-19.13 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

25. Epigraphy, Ils, 3, 928, 1921

26. Epigraphy, Illrp, 310-311, 309

27. Florus Lucius Annaeus, Epitome Bellorum Omnium Annorum Dcc, 2.13.91

28. Various, Anthologia Latina, 9.730



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
access, to houses Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
aediles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
aeneas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
ancestors Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
aquilius florus turcianus gallus, l. Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
arches Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
artemis, and actaeon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
athens Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
augustus, cleans capitoline of statues Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
augustus, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
caieta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
capite velato Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
care of sacred objects, appoint tresviri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
care of sacred objects Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
career, details of on inscription Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
censors, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
cincius, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
class status Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
claudius, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
columns, inscribed Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
corinth, achaea Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
cornelii scipiones, senatorial family Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
cornelius scipio nasica, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
curatores operum publicorum Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
curia, senate-house Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
cursus honorum Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
decurions, municipal Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
delos, ware from Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
dress, citizens Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
dress, elite Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
dress, masculine Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
dress, public ceremonial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
duumviri aedi dedicandae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
elogia Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
equites romani, roman equestrians Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
fabius maximus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
forum Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
forums, functions of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
funerary inscriptions/epitaphs Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
gymnasia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
hermae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
hispania citerior/tarraconensis, province Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
honorific inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
house, access to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
house, atrium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
house, fauces Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
house, public versus private nature Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
house, tablinum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
identity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
inscriptions, typology of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
julius caesar, c. Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
jupiter, capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
l. d. d. d. Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
leen, a. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
lysippus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
mahdia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
marble, pentelic Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
marsyas, apollo punishes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
megara Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
mummius achaicus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
myron, his bull Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
nautii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
nero, colossus of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
objects, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
objects, their public versus private context Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
of the roman state Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
otacilius crassus, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
palaestrum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
pedestals, inscribed Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
phidias Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
philip ii of macedon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
plaques, inscribed Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
pomponius atticus, t., agent for cicero Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
popilius laenas, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
portraits, private Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
portraits Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
powers Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
praxiteles, and the venus of cos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
private versus public Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
public inscriptions' Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
republic Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
republican inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
romanitas Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
rome, forum of peace, and venus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, forum romanum Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
rome, portico of octavia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, saepta julia, statues of achilles and chiron in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, saepta julia, statues of olympus and pan in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, cult statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome, temple of mens Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome, temple of venus eryx Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome, tomb of the scipios Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
self-fashioning Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
senate, at rome Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
senate Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
simulacrum versus signum, of wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
stambaugh, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
statuary, over-population of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
statuary, problems of identification Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 303
statuary, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
statues, capite velato Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
statues, honorific Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 92
statues Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
sundial Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
toga Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
togatus (pl. togati) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
trajan, his house on the aventine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
tullius Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
tullius cicero, m., as collector Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
tullius cicero, m., his academy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
tullius cicero, m., villa at tusculum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60
veil, veiling Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 93
vespasian, patronizes artists Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
vitruvius, on houses Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 60