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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.17


nanIn the aedileship of Marcus Scaurus there were 3000 statues on the stage in what was only a temporary theatre. Mummius after conquering Achaia filled the city with statues, though destined not to leave enough at his death to provide a dowry for his daughter — for why not mention this as well as the fact that excuses it? A great many were also imported by the Luculli. Yet it is stated by Mucianus who was three times consul that there are still 3000 statues at Rhodes, and no smaller number are believed still to exist at Athens, Olympia and Delphi. What mortal man could recapitulate them all, or what value can be felt in such information? Still it may give pleasure just to allude to the most remarkable and to name the artists of celebrity, though it would be impossible to enumerate the total number of the works of each, inasmuch as Lysippus is said to have executed 1500 works of art, all of them so skilful that each of them by itself might have made him famous; the number is said to have been discovered after his decease, when his heir broke open his coffers, it having been his practice to put aside a coin of the value of one gold denarius out of what he got as reward for his handicraft for each statue., The art rose to incredible heights in success and afterwards in boldness of design. To prove its success I will adduce one instance, and that not of a representation of either a god or a man: our own generation saw on the Capitol, before it last went up in flames burnt at the hands of the adherents of Vitellius, in the shrine of Juno, a bronze figure of a hound licking its wound, the miraculous excellence and absolute truth to life of which is shown not only by the fact of its dedication in that place but also by the method taken for insuring it; for as no sum of money seemed to equal its value, the government enacted that its custodians should be answerable for its safety with their lives.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Pindar, Paeanes, 7 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 632-635, 631 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

631. ἀλλ' ἐμοῦ μὲν οὐ τυραννεύσους', ἐπεὶ φυλάξομαι
3. Herodotus, Histories, 5.74-5.78 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.74. Cleomenes, however, fully aware that the Athenians had done him wrong in word and deed, mustered an army from the whole of the Peloponnesus. He did not declare the purpose for which he mustered it, namely to avenge himself on the Athenian people and set up Isagoras, who had come with him out of the acropolis, as tyrant. ,Cleomenes broke in as far as Eleusis with a great host, and the Boeotians, by a concerted plan, took Oenoe and Hysiae, districts on the borders of Attica, while the Chalcidians attacked on another side and raided lands in Attica. The Athenians, who were now caught in a ring of foes, decided to oppose the Spartans at Eleusis and to deal with the Boeotians and Chalcidians later. 5.75. When the armies were about to join battle, the Corinthians, coming to the conclusion that they were acting wrongly, changed their minds and departed. Later Demaratus son of Ariston, the other king of Sparta, did likewise, despite the fact that he had come with Cleomenes from Lacedaemon in joint command of the army and had not till now been at variance with him. ,As a result of this dissension, a law was made at Sparta that when an army was despatched, both kings would not be permitted to go with it. Until that time they had both gone together, but now one of the kings was released from service and one of the sons of Tyndarus too could be left at home. Before that time, both of these also were asked to give aid and went with the army. ,So now at Eleusis, when the rest of the allies saw that the Lacedaemonian kings were not of one mind and that the Corinthians had left their host, they too went off. 5.76. This was the fourth time that Dorians had come into Attica. They had come twice as invaders in war and twice as helpers of the Athenian people. The first time was when they planted a settlement at Megara (this expedition may rightly be said to have been in the reign of Codrus), the second and third when they set out from Sparta to drive out the sons of Pisistratus, and the fourth was now, when Cleomenes broke in as far as Eleusis with his following of Peloponnesians. This was accordingly the fourth Dorian invasion of Athens. 5.77. When this force then had been ingloriously scattered, the Athenians first marched against the Chalcidians to punish them. The Boeotians came to the Euripus to help the Chalcidians and as soon as the Athenians saw these allies, they resolved to attack the Boeotians before the Chalcidians. ,When they met the Boeotians in battle, they won a great victory, slaying very many and taking seven hundred of them prisoner. On that same day the Athenians crossed to Euboea where they met the Chalcidians too in battle, and after overcoming them as well, they left four thousand tet farmers on the lands of the horse-breeders. ,Horse-breeders was the name given to the men of substance among the Chalcidians. They fettered as many of these as they took alive and kept them imprisoned with the captive Boeotians. In time, however, they set them free, each for an assessed ransom of two minae. The fetters in which the prisoners had been bound they hung up in the acropolis, where they could still be seen in my time hanging from walls which the Persians' fire had charred, opposite the temple which faces west. ,Moreover, they made a dedication of a tenth part of the ransom, and this money was used for the making of a four-horse chariot which stands on the left hand of the entrance into the outer porch of the acropolis and bears this inscription: quote type="inscription" l met="dact" Athens with Chalcis and Boeotia fought, /l lBound them in chains and brought their pride to naught. /l lPrison was grief, and ransom cost them dear- /l lOne tenth to Pallas raised this chariot here. /l /quote 5.78. So the Athenians grew in power and proved, not in one respect only but in all, that equality is a good thing. Evidence for this is the fact that while they were under tyrannical rulers, the Athenians were no better in war than any of their neighbors, yet once they got rid of their tyrants, they were by far the best of all. This, then, shows that while they were oppressed, they were, as men working for a master, cowardly, but when they were freed, each one was eager to achieve for himself.
4. Isaeus, Orations, 5.47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.20.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.20.2. The general Athenian public fancy that Hipparchus was tyrant when he fell by the hands of Harmodius and Aristogiton; not knowing that Hippias, the eldest of the sons of Pisistratus, was really supreme, and that Hipparchus and Thessalus were his brothers; and that Harmodius and Aristogiton suspecting, on the very day, nay at the very moment fixed on for the deed, that information had been conveyed to Hippias by their accomplices, concluded that he had been warned, and did not attack him, yet, not liking to be apprehended and risk their lives for nothing, fell upon Hipparchus near the temple of the daughters of Leos, and slew him as he was arranging the Panathenaic procession.
6. Xenophon, On Household Management, 4.4-4.25 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.4. But what arts, pray, do you advise us to follow, Socrates ? Need we be ashamed of imitating the king of the Persians? For they say that he pays close attention to husbandry and the art of war, holding that these are two of the noblest and most necessary pursuits. 4.5. And do you really believe, Socrates , exclaimed Critobulus on hearing this, that the king of the Persians includes husbandry among his occupations? Perhaps, Critobulus, the following considerations will enable us to discover whether he does so. We allow that he pays close attention to warfare, because he has given a standing order to every governor of the nations from which he receives tribute, to supply maintece for a specified number of horsemen and archers and slingers and light infantry, that they may be strong enough to control his subjects and to protect the country in the event of an invasion; and 4.6. apart from these, he maintains garrisons in the citadels. Maintece for these is supplied by the governor charged with this duty, and the king annually reviews the mercenaries and all the other troops ordered to be under arms, assembling all but the men in the citadels at the place of muster, as it is called: he personally inspects the men who are near his residence, and sends trusted agents to review those who live far away. 4.7. The officers, whether commanders of garrisons or of regiments or viceroys, who turn out with a full complement of men and parade them equipped with horses and arms in good condition, he promotes in the scale of honour and enriches with large grants of money; but those officers whom he finds to be neglecting the garrisons or making profit out of them he punishes severely, and appoints others to take their office. These actions, then, seem to us to leave no room for question that he pays attention to warfare. 4.8. As for the country, he personally examines so much of it as he sees in the course of his progress through it; and he receives reports from his trusted agents on the territories that he does not see for himself. To those governors who are able to show him that their country is densely populated and that the land is in cultivation and well stocked with the trees of the district and with the crops, he assigns more territory and gives presents, and rewards them with seats of honour. Cyropaedia, VIII. i. 39. Those whose territory he finds uncultivated and thinly populated either through harsh administration or through contempt or through carelessness, he punishes, and appoints others to take their office. 4.9. By such action, does he seem to provide less for the cultivation of the land by the inhabitants than for its protection by the garrisons? Moreover, each of these duties is entrusted to a separate class of officers; one class governs the residents and the labourers, and collects tribute from them, the other commands the men under arms and the garrisons. 4.10. If the commander of a garrison affords insufficient protection to the country, the civil governor and controller of agriculture denounces the commander, setting out that the inhabitants are unable to work the farms for want of protection. If, on the other hand, the commander brings peace to the farms, and the governor nevertheless causes the land to be sparsely populated and idle, the commander in turn denounces the governor. 4.11. For, roughly speaking, where cultivation is inefficient, the garrisons are not maintained and the tribute cannot be paid. Wherever a viceroy is appointed, he attends to both these matters. At this point Critobulus said: 4.12. Well, Socrates , if the Great King does this, it seems to me that he pays as much attention to husbandry as to warfare. 4.13. Yet further, continued Socrates , in all the districts he resides in and visits he takes care that there are paradises, as they call them, full of all the good and beautiful things that the soil will produce, and in this he himself spends most of his time, except when the season precludes it. 4.14. Then it is of course necessary, Socrates , to take care that these paradises in which the king spends his time shall contain a fine stock of trees and all other beautiful things that the soil produces. 4.15. And some say, Critobulus, that when the king makes gifts, he first invites those who have distinguished themselves in war, because it is useless to have broad acres under tillage unless there are men to defend them; and next to them, those who stock and cultivate the land best, saying that even stout-hearted warriors cannot live without the aid of workers. 4.16. There is a story that Cyrus , lately the most illustrious of princes, once said to the company invited to receive his gifts, I myself deserve to receive the gifts awarded in both classes; for I am the best at stocking land and the best at protecting the stock. 4.17. Well, if Cyrus said that, Socrates , he took as much pride in cultivating and stocking land as in being a warrior. 4.18. Yes, and, upon my word, if Cyrus had only lived, it seems that he would have proved an excellent ruler. One of the many proofs that he has given of this is the fact that, when he was on his way to fight his brother for the throne, it is said that not a man deserted from Cyrus to the king, whereas tens of thousands deserted from the king to Cyrus . 4.19. I think you have one clear proof of a ruler’s excellence, when men obey him willingly Mem III. iii. 9. and choose to stand by him in moments of danger. Now his friends all fought at his side and fell at his side to a man, fighting round his body, with the one exception of Ariaeus, whose place in the battle was, in point of fact, on the left wing. Anabasis, I. ix. 31. Ariaeus fled when he saw that Cyrus had fallen. 4.20. Further, the story goes that when Lysander came to him bringing the gifts form the allies, this Cyrus showed him various marks of friendliness, as Lysander himself related once to a stranger at Megara , adding besides that Cyrus personally showed him round his paradise at Sardis . 4.21. Now Lysander admired the beauty of the trees in it, the accuracy of the spacing, the straightness of the rows, the regularity of the angles and the multitude of the sweet scents that clung round them as they walked; and for wonder of these things he cried, Cyrus , I really do admire all these lovely things, but I am far more impressed with your agent’s skill in measuring and arranging everything so exactly. 4.22. Cyrus was delighted to hear this and said: Well, Lysander , the whole of the measurement and arrangement is my own work, and I did some of the planting myself. 4.23. What, Cyrus ? exclaimed Lysander, looking at him, and marking the beauty and perfume of his robes, and the splendour of the necklaces and bangles and other jewels that he was wearing; did you really plant part of this with your own hands? 4.24. Does that surprise you, Lysander? asked Cyrus in reply. I swear by the Sun-god that I never yet sat down to dinner when in sound health, without first working hard at some task of war or agriculture, or exerting myself somehow. 4.25. Lysander himself declared, I should add, that on hearing this, he congratulated him in these words: I think you deserve your happiness, Cyrus, for you earn it by your virtues.
7. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 18.2-18.6, 58.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.280 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Dinarchus, Or., 1.101 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.29.81 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 3.16.7-3.16.8, 4.10.3, 7.19.2 (1st cent. CE

3.16.7. ἀφίκετο δὲ ἐς Σοῦσα Ἀλέξανδρος ἐκ Βαβυλῶνος ἐν ἡμέραις εἴκοσι· καὶ παρελθὼν ἐς τὴν πόλιν τά τε χρήματα παρέλαβεν ὄντα ἀργυρίου τάλαντα ἐς πεντακισμύρια καὶ τὴν ἄλλην κατασκευὴν τὴν βασιλικήν. πολλὰ δὲ καὶ ἄλλα κατελήφθη αὐτοῦ, ὅσα Ξέρξης ἀπὸ τῆς Ἑλλάδος ἄγων ἦλθε, τά τε ἄλλα καὶ Ἁρμοδίου καὶ Ἀριστογείτονος χαλκαῖ εἰκόνες. 3.16.8. καὶ ταύτας Ἀθηναίοις ὀπίσω πέμπει Ἀλέξανδρος, καὶ νῦν κεῖνται Ἀθήνησιν ἐν Κεραμεικῷ αἱ εἰκόνες, ᾗ ἄνιμεν ἐς πόλιν, καταντικρὺ μάλιστα τοῦ Μητρῴου, οὐ μακρὰν τῶν Εὐδανέμων τοῦ βωμοῦ· ὅστις δὲ μεμύηται ταῖν θεαῖν ἐν Ἐλευσῖνι, οἶδε τοῦ Εὐδανέμου τὸν βωμὸν ἐπὶ τοῦ δαπέδου ὄντα. 4.10.3. εἰσὶ δὲ οἳ καὶ τάδε ἀνέγραψαν, ὡς ἄρα ἤρετο αὐτόν ποτε Φιλώτας ὅντινα οἴοιτο μάλιστα τιμηθῆναι πρὸς τῆς Ἀθηναίων πόλεως· τὸν δὲ ἀποκρίνασθαι Ἁρμόδιον καὶ Ἀριστογείτονα, ὅτι τὸν ἕτερον τοῖν τυράννοιν ἔκτειναν καὶ τυραννίδα ὅτι κατέλυσαν. 7.19.2. ὅσους δὲ ἀνδριάντας ἢ ὅσα ἀγάλματα ἢ εἰ δή τι ἄλλο ἀνάθημα ἐκ τῆς Ἑλλάδος Ξέρξης ἀνεκόμισεν ἐς Βαβυλῶνα ἢ ἐς Πασαργάδας ἢ ἐς Σοῦσα ἢ ὅπῃ ἄλλῃ τῆς Ἀσίας, ταῦτα δοῦναι ἄγειν τοῖς πρέσβεσι· καὶ τὰς Ἁρμοδίου καὶ Ἀριστογείτονος εἰκόνας τὰς χαλκᾶς οὕτω λέγεται ἀπενεχθῆναι ὀπίσω ἐς Ἀθήνας καὶ τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος τῆς Κελκέας τὸ ἕδος.
12. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.16, 34.69-34.70 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 18 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.8.5, 1.23.9, 8.46.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.8.5. Hard by stand statues of Harmodius and Aristogiton, who killed Hipparchus. 514 B.C. The reason of this act and the method of its execution have been related by others; of the figures some were made by Critius fl. c. 445 B.C., the old ones being the work of Antenor. When Xerxes took Athens after the Athenians had abandoned the city he took away these statues also among the spoils, but they were afterwards restored to the Athenians by Antiochus. 1.23.9. of the statues that stand after the horse, the likeness of Epicharinus who practised the race in armour was made by Critius, while Oenobius performed a kind service for Thucydides the son of Olorus. The great historian of the Peloponnesian war. He succeeded in getting a decree passed for the return of Thucydides to Athens, who was treacherously murdered as he was returning, and there is a monument to him not far from the Melitid gate. 8.46.3. Xerxes, too, the son of Dareius, the king of Persia, apart from the spoil he carried away from the city of Athens, took besides, as we know, from Brauron the image of Brauronian Artemis, and furthermore, accusing the Milesians of cowardice in a naval engagement against the Athenians in Greek waters, carried away from them the bronze Apollo at Branchidae . This it was to be the lot of Seleucus afterwards to restore to the Milesians, but the Argives down to the present still retain the images they took from Tiryns ; one, a wooden image, is by the Hera, the other is kept in the sanctuary of Lycian Apollo.
16. Philostratus, Pictures, 1.15 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

17. Andocides, Orations, 1.96-1.98

18. Andocides, Orations, 1.96-1.98

19. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131

20. Epigraphy, Ig I , 131

21. Lycurgus, Orations, 1.117



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaemenids Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
agriculture Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
ahuramazda Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
ambassadors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
antenor, statue group of athenian tyrannicides Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
antenor Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
antipater Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
apollo Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
aristogeiton Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
aristogeiton (tyrant-slayer) Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
arrhachion of phigalia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
arrian Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
art and artists Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
asia, europe and Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
athens, acropolis of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
athens and athenians, in persian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
athens and athenians, tyranny and Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
athletic victories, as benefactions Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
augustus, emperor, scribe of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
boeotia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
bronze tablets/plaques Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
chalcis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
cicero Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
cleisthenes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
cleombrotus, son of dexilaus of sybaris Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
clients and patrons Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
critius Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
croesus, fall of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
cyrus the great Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
darius i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
delphi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
democracy, athenian Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
dionysius Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
dogs Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 91
earth (gaea) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
elgin throne Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
epicharinus, athenian athlete Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
epinikia, commission of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
epitaphia Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 77
euergetism, origins of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
family, family relations and structures Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
gift-exchange, institutional/formal Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
gift-exchange, non-institutional/informal Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
harmodios and aristogeiton, cult Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 77
harmodios and aristogeiton, honours for Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 77
harmodios and aristogeiton, tyrannicides Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 77
harmodius Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86, 137
herodotus, on sovereignty Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
herodotus, on tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
hipparchos, son of peisistratos, death of Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 77
hipparchus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
hippias, son of peisistratos, tyranny Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 77
hippias of athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
honorific inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 91
honors, controversy surrounding Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
inscriptions, typology of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 91
isola sacra Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
jove Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
lamentation and grief Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
latin inscriptions, number of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
leadership, as benefaction Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
marathon Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
mediterranean, roman Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
memoria, monuments and Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 20
memoria Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 20
military commanders Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
mills Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
mishnah Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
mosaics, with inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 91
mythology Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
necropoleis Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
neptune Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
nesiotes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
oikos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
olympia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
panathenaic prize amphorae Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
patrons of municipalities Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
persae, and greek culture Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
persia and persians, religion of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
persia and persians, sovereignty claimed by Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
persian wars Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
persians, and greek culture Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
persians, and greek legends Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
persians, visual representations Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
philostratus Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
pindar Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
pliny the elder Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
pneuma Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
pompeii Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 91
proedria Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86, 137
property law, religious law Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
prytaneion decree Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
public inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 91
religion Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
republican inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
roman civilization, gods Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
rome, necropolis on the via triumphalis Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
rome (ancient), civic tributes to memory Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 20
rome (ancient), funeral/commemorative rituals Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 20
rome (ancient) Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 20
scribes, scribae Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
sculptors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
sculpture, iconography Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
sculpture, messages, symbolism, and perceptions of Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
sculpture, mythological scenes Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
sculpture, of gods Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
sculpture Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
sitêsis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86, 137
social hierarchy Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
songs Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
sparta and spartans Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
statue bases Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
statue group, of athenian tyrannicides Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
statues, greek Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
statues, in athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
statues, of arrhachion of phigalia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
statues, of cleombrotus of sybaris Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
statues, of epicharinus (by critius) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
statues, of harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
statues, of hipparchus, son of charmus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
statues, of military commanders Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 137
statues Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 20
sulla Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
temple, of apollo at delphi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
temples Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 20
thamugadi, timgad, numidia Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 132
thomsen, rudi Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
tyrannicides Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
tyranny, greek attitudes towards Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
tyranny, theology of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
tyrtaeus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
visual images, of greeks and persians' Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51
visual language Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
vulcan Eliav, A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 184
wilamowitz-moellendorff, ulrich von Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 396
xenia (hospitality meal) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86
xenophanes Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 86, 137
xenophon of athens, on persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 239
xerxes Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 51