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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 33.41


nanOf secondary importance a is the fact that experience has also discovered a way of getting hydrargyrum or artificial quicksilver as a substitute for real quicksilver; we postponed the description of this a little previously. It is made in two ways, not by pounding red-lead in vinegar with a copper pestle in a copper mortar, or it is put in an iron shell in flat earthenware pans, and covered with a convex lid smeared on with clay, and then a fire is lit under the pans and kept constantly burning by means of bellows, and so the surface moisture (with the colour of silver and the fluidity of water) which forms on the lid is wiped off it. This moisture is also easily divided into drops and rains down freely with slippery fluidity. And as cinnabar and red-lead are admitted to be poisons, all the current instructions on the subject of its employment for medicinal purposes are in my opinion decidedly risky, except perhaps that its application to the head or stomach arrests haemorrhage, provided that it does not find access to the vital organs or come in contact with a lesion. In any other way for my own part I would not recommend its employment.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 101-141, 68-100 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

100. A word – you’ll not be harmed in any way.
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.62 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.62. Those gods therefore who were the authors of various benefits owned their deification to the value of the benefits which they bestowed, and indeed the names that I just now enumerated express the various powers of the gods that bear them. "Human experience moreover and general custom have made it a practice to confer the deification of renown and gratitude upon of distinguished benefactors. This is the origin of Hercules, of Castor and Pollux, of Aesculapius, and also of Liber (I mean Liber the son of Semele, not the Liber whom our ancestors solemnly and devoutly consecrated with Ceres and Libera, the import of which joint consecration may be gathered from the mysteries; but Liber and Libera were so named as Ceres' offspring, that being the meaning of our Latin word liberi — a use which has survived in the case of Libera but not of Liber) — and this is also the origin of Romulus, who is believed to be the same as Quirinus. And these benefactors were duly deemed divine, as being both supremely good and immortal, because their souls survived and enjoyed eternal life.
3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 6.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.1. 1.  The foregoing is told by Diodorus in the Third Book of his history. And the same writer, in the sixth Book as well, confirms the same view regarding the gods, drawing from the writing of Euhemerus of Messenê, and using the following words:,2.  "As regards the gods, then, men of ancient times have handed down to later generations two different conceptions: Certain of the gods, they say, are eternal and imperishable, such as the sun and moon and the other stars of the heavens, and the winds as well and whatever else possesses a nature similar to theirs; for of each of these the genesis and duration are from everlasting to everlasting. But the other gods, we are told, were terrestrial beings who attained to immortal honour and fame because of their benefactions to mankind, such as Heracles, Dionysus, Aristaeus, and the others who were like them.,3.  Regarding these terrestrial gods many and varying accounts have been handed down by the writers of history and mythology; of the historians, Euhemerus, who composed the Sacred History, has written a special treatise about them, while, of the writers of myths, Homer and Hesiod and Orpheus and the others of their kind have invented rather monstrous stories about the gods. But for our part, we shall endeavour to run over briefly the accounts which both groups of writers have given, aiming at due proportion in our exposition.,4.  "Now Euhemerus, who was a friend of King Cassander and was required by him to perform certain affairs of state and to make great journeys abroad, says that he travelled southward as far as the ocean; for setting sail from Arabia the Blest he voyaged through the ocean for a considerable number of days and was carried to the shore of some islands in the sea, one of which bore the name of Panchaea. On this island he saw the Panchaeans who dwell there, who excel in piety and honour the gods with the most magnificent sacrifices and with remarkable votive offerings of silver and of gold.,5.  The island is sacred to the gods, and there are a number of other objects on it which are admired both for their antiquity and for the great skill of their workmanship, regarding which severally we have written in the preceding Books.,6.  There is also on the island, situated upon an exceedingly high hill, a sanctuary of Zeus Triphylius, which was established by him during the time when he was king of all the inhabited world and was still in the company of men.,7.  And in this temple there is a stele of gold on which is inscribed in summary, in the writing employed by the Panchaeans, the deeds of Uranus and Cronus and Zeus.,8.  "Euhemerus goes on to say that Uranus was the first to be king, that he was an honourable man and beneficent, who was versed in the movement of the stars, and that he was also the first to honour the gods of the heavens with sacrifices, whence he was called Uranus or "Heaven.",9.  There were born to him by his wife Hestia two sons, Titan and Cronus, and two daughters, Rhea and Demeter. Cronus became king after Uranus, and marrying Rhea he begat Zeus and Hera and Poseidon. And Zeus, on succeeding to the kingship, married Hera and Demeter and Themis, and by them he had children, the Curetes by the first named, Persephonê by the second, and Athena by the third.,10.  And going to Babylon he was entertained by Belus, and after that he went to the island of Panchaea, which lies in the ocean, and here he set up an altar to Uranus, the founder of his family. From there he passed through Syria and came to Casius, who was ruler of Syria at that time, and who gave his name to Mt. Casius. And coming to Cilicia he conquered in battle Cilix, the governor of the region, and he visited very many other nations, all of which paid honour to him and publicly proclaimed him a god.",11.  After recounting what I have given and more to the same effect about the gods, as if about mortal men, Diodorus goes on to say: "Now regarding Euhemerus, who composed the Sacred History, we shall rest content with what has been said, and shall endeavour to run over briefly the myths which the Greeks recount concerning the gods, as they are given by Hesiod and Homer and Orpheus." Thereupon Diodorus goes on to add the myths as the poets give them.
4. Livy, History, 29.37.2, 36.36.3-36.36.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Amores, 1.5.9-1.5.14, 1.7.47-1.7.48, 3.1.7-3.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.32, 2.297-2.302, 3.169-3.192, 3.273 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Fasti, 1.405-1.410, 2.319-2.324 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.405. There were Naiads too, some with uncombed flowing hair 1.406. Others with their tresses artfully bound. 1.407. One attends with tunic tucked high above the knee 1.408. Another shows her breast through her loosened robe: 1.409. One bares her shoulder: another trails her hem in the grass 1.410. Their tender feet are not encumbered with shoes. 2.319. She gave him thin vests dyed in Gaetulian purple 2.320. Gave him the elegant zone that had bound her waist. 2.321. The zone was too small for his belly, and he unfastened 2.322. The clasps of the vests to thrust out his great hands. 2.323. He fractured her bracelets, not made for such arms 2.324. And his giant feet split the little shoes.
8. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.15, 4.7.40-4.7.41, 4.11.61 (1st cent. BCE

9. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.10.61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.215-4.217, 9.616 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age
11. Juvenal, Satires, 6.526-6.530 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.360-2.364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 11.77 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.26.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Seneca The Younger, De Vita Beata (Dialogorum Liber Vii), 26.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 16.4, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Statius, Siluae, 3.2.142-3.2.143 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Tacitus, Annals, 14.21, 15.44 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.21.  It was this very prospect of licence which attracted the majority; and yet their pretexts were decently phrased:— "Even our ancestors had not been averse from amusing themselves with spectacles in keeping with the standard of wealth in their day; and that was the reason why actors had been imported from Etruria and horse-races from Thurii. Since the annexation of Achaia and Asia, games had been exhibited in a more ambitious style; and yet, at Rome, no one born in a respectable rank of life had condescended to the stage as a profession, though it was now two hundred years since the triumph of Lucius Mummius, who first gave an exhibition of the kind in the capital. But, more than this, it had been a measure of economy when the theatre was housed in a permanent building instead of being reared and razed, year after year, at enormous expense. Again, the magistrates would not have the same drain upon their private resources, nor the populace the same excuse for demanding contests in the Greek style from the magistrates, when the cost was defrayed by the state. The victories of orators and poets would apply a spur to genius; nor need it lie heavy on the conscience of any judge, if he had not turned a deaf ear to reputable arts and to legitimate pleasures. It was to gaiety, rather than to wantonness, that a few nights were being given out of five whole years — nights in which, owing to the blaze of illuminations, nothing illicit could be concealed." The display in question, it must be granted, passed over without any glaring scandal; and there was no outbreak, even slight, of popular partisanship, since the pantomimic actors, though restored to the stage, were debarred from the sacred contests. The first prize for eloquence was not awarded, but an announcement was made that the Caesar had proved victorious. The Greek dress, in which a great number of spectators had figured during the festival, immediately went out of vogue. 15.44.  So far, the precautions taken were suggested by human prudence: now means were sought for appeasing deity, and application was made to the Sibylline books; at the injunction of which public prayers were offered to Vulcan, Ceres, and Proserpine, while Juno was propitiated by the matrons, first in the Capitol, then at the nearest point of the sea-shore, where water was drawn for sprinkling the temple and image of the goddess. Ritual banquets and all-night vigils were celebrated by women in the married state. But neither human help, nor imperial munificence, nor all the modes of placating Heaven, could stifle scandal or dispel the belief that the fire had taken place by order. Therefore, to scotch the rumour, Nero substituted as culprits, and punished with the utmost refinements of cruelty, a class of men, loathed for their vices, whom the crowd styled Christians. Christus, the founder of the name, had undergone the death penalty in the reign of Tiberius, by sentence of the procurator Pontius Pilatus, and the pernicious superstition was checked for a moment, only to break out once more, not merely in Judaea, the home of the disease, but in the capital itself, where all things horrible or shameful in the world collect and find a vogue. First, then, the confessed members of the sect were arrested; next, on their disclosures, vast numbers were convicted, not so much on the count of arson as for hatred of the human race. And derision accompanied their end: they were covered with wild beasts' skins and torn to death by dogs; or they were fastened on crosses, and, when daylight failed were burned to serve as lamps by night. Nero had offered his Gardens for the spectacle, and gave an exhibition in his Circus, mixing with the crowd in the habit of a charioteer, or mounted on his car. Hence, in spite of a guilt which had earned the most exemplary punishment, there arose a sentiment of pity, due to the impression that they were being sacrificed not for the welfare of the state but to the ferocity of a single man.
21. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegyptiaca Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
aesculapius Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
atlantia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
aurum (gold) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 350
christians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
crocodiles Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
cultural, consciousness of center and periphery Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
cybele Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
divinity Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
domitian (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
egypt, gods of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
emperors and egypt, vespasian Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
epigram (literary genre) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
euhemeros of messene Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
flavian period (literature, dress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 350
fortunata (wife of trimalchio) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 271
harpocrates, greco-egyptian deity Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
harpokration Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
isaeum campense, temple of isis, female devotees of Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
isis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
jewellery Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271
knights (equites) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271, 350
legs Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271, 350
luxury Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
magna mater Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
marcia Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
martial Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 350
matrona Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 350
mitra (headscarf) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
nero (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271, 350
ovid Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
periscelides (ankle bracelets) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271, 350
petronius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 271
phaecasia (shoe) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271
plebs, plebeian Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271, 350
pliny the elder, and egyptian deities Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
pliny the elder, and the nile Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
propertius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
ptolemaic period Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
rector' Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
red ( Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271
rome (monuments and features in city), palatine hill Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
rome (monuments and features in city), synagogues in Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
senators Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 350
serapis, greco-egyptian deity Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 127
serapis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
slavery, slave Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271
stereotypes vii Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 350
stola (dress/robe) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 350
subucula (undertunic) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 271
synthesis (garment) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
titus (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
trica (triclinium (trimalchio Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 271
valerius maximus Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
veil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
vespasian (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 39
wool, woollen Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222