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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 33.147
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Horace, Odes, 1.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.14. although these be as far inferior to them in abilities as they are different in their notions from them. For of old everyone took upon them to write what happened in his own time; where their immediate concern in the actions made their promises of value; and where it must be reproachful to write lies, when they must be known by the readers to be such. 1.14. Yet did not he perform any of the conditions he had agreed to; for Aristobulus’s party would not so much as admit Gabinius into the city, who was sent to receive the money that he had promised.
2. Livy, History, 45.35.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 1.261-1.262 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.261. And how the treacherous keeper, Tarpeia, bribed with bracelets 1.262. Led the silent Sabines to the heights of the citadel.
4. Strabo, Geography, 13.1.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13.1.54. From Scepsis came the Socratic philosophers Erastus and Coriscus and Neleus the son of Coriscus, this last a man who not only was a pupil of Aristotle and Theophrastus, but also inherited the library of Theophrastus, which included that of Aristotle. At any rate, Aristotle bequeathed his own library to Theophrastus, to whom he also left his school; and he is the first man, so far as I know, to have collected books and to have taught the kings in Egypt how to arrange a library. Theophrastus bequeathed it to Neleus; and Neleus took it to Scepsis and bequeathed it to his heirs, ordinary people, who kept the books locked up and not even carefully stored. But when they heard bow zealously the Attalic kings to whom the city was subject were searching for books to build up the library in Pergamum, they hid their books underground in a kind of trench. But much later, when the books had been damaged by moisture and moths, their descendants sold them to Apellicon of Teos for a large sum of money, both the books of Aristotle and those of Theophrastus. But Apellicon was a bibliophile rather than a philosopher; and therefore, seeking a restoration of the parts that had been eaten through, he made new copies of the text, filling up the gaps incorrectly, and published the books full of errors. The result was that the earlier school of Peripatetics who came after Theophrastus had no books at all, with the exception of only a few, mostly exoteric works, and were therefore able to philosophize about nothing in a practical way, but only to talk bombast about commonplace propositions, whereas the later school, from the time the books in question appeared, though better able to philosophise and Aristotelise, were forced to call most of their statements probabilities, because of the large number of errors. Rome also contributed much to this; for, immediately after the death of Apellicon, Sulla, who had captured Athens, carried off Apellicon's library to Rome, where Tyrannion the grammarian, who was fond of Aristotle, got it in his hands by paying court to the librarian, as did also certain booksellers who used bad copyists and would not collate the texts — a thing that also takes place in the case of the other books that are copied for selling, both here and at Alexandria. However, this is enough about these men.
5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.75, 13.83, 13.92, 33.142, 34.11-34.12, 34.59, 35.26, 36.13, 36.58 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Lucullus, 42.1-42.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Sulla, 26.1-26.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Tacitus, Annals, 2.37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.37.  In addition, he gave monetary help to several senators; so that it was the more surprising when he treated the application of the young noble, Marcus Hortalus, with a superciliousness uncalled for in view of his clearly straitened circumstances. He was a grandson of the orator Hortensius; and the late Augustus, by the grant of a million sesterces, had induced him to marry and raise a family, in order to save his famous house from extinction. With his four sons, then, standing before the threshold of the Curia, he awaited his turn to speak; then, directing his gaze now to the portrait of Hortensius among the orators (the senate was meeting in the Palace), now to that of Augustus, he opened in the following manner:— "Conscript Fathers, these children whose number and tender age you see for yourselves, became mine not from any wish of my own, but because the emperor so advised, and because, at the same time, my ancestors had earned the right to a posterity. For to me, who in this changed world had been able to inherit nothing and acquire nothing, — not money, nor popularity, nor eloquence, that general birthright of our house, — to me it seemed enough if my slender means were neither a disgrace to myself nor a burden to my neighbour. At the command of the sovereign, I took a wife; and here you behold the stock of so many consuls, the offspring of so many dictators! I say it, not to awaken odium, but to woo compassion. Some day, Caesar, under your happy sway, they will wear whatever honours you have chosen to bestow: in the meantime, rescue from beggary the great-grandsons of Quintus Hortensius, the fosterlings of the deified Augustus!
10. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.9.4, 4.3.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 58.7.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

58.7.2.  (for he was wont to include himself in such sacrifices), a rope was discovered coiled about the neck of the statue. Again, there was the behaviour of a statue of Fortune, which had belonged, they say, to Tullius, one of the former kings of Rome, but was at this time kept by Sejanus at his house and was a source of great pride to him:


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aelius paetus catus, sex. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
aelius sejanus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
aelius tubero, q. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
aemilius paullus, l. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
aemilius paullus, m., and persues royal galley Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
aemilius paullus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
ajax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
andronicus of rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
antigonus ii gonatas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
antony, marc Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
aristotle Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
augustus, column dedicated to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
augustus, his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
columnae rostratae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
continentia Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
cornelius scipio aemilianus, p. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
cornelius sulla, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
fabius maximus allobrogicus, q. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
felicitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
fortuna Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
gegania Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
greece Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
hieron ii of syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
house, access to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
julius caesar, c., and the civil war Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
julius caesar, c., and the gallic war Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
julius caesar, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
libraries, of apellicon the teian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
libraries Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
licinius lucullus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
livius drusus, m. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
mentor Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67, 131
mentor (silversmith) Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
octavius, cn., naval victory over perseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
paupertas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
perseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
perseus of macedon Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
pliny the elder Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
plutarch Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
pomponius secundus, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
ptolemy ii philadelphus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
rome, comitium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
rostra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
sempronius gracchus, ti. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
semproniusgracchus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
ships, displayed as spoils Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 131
silver Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
tarpeia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
theophrastus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
trees, citrus wood' Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
tubero catus, q. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 355
tullius cicero, m., his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
tyrannion the grammarian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
vergil, his letters collected Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67
vipsanius agrippa, m., purchases paintings from the cyzicans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 67