Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 28.11


nanWe are assured that the hand of a person carried off by premature death cures by a touch scrofulous sores, diseased parotid glands, and throat affections; some however say that the back of any dead person's left hand will do this if the patient is of the same sex. A piece bitten off from wood struck by lightning by a person with hands thrown behind his back, if it is applied to an aching tooth, is a remedy we are told for the pain. Some prescribe fumigation of the tooth with a human tooth from one of the same sex, and to use as an amulet a dog-tooth taken from an unburied corpse. Earth taken out of a skull acts, it is said, as a depilator for the eyelashes, while any plant that has grown in the skull makes, when chewed, the teeth fall out, and ulcers marked round with a human bone do not spread. Some mix in equal quantities water from three wells, pour a libation from new earthenware, and give the rest to be drunk, at the rise of temperature, by sufferers from tertian ague. These also wrap up in wool and tie round the neck of quartan patients a piece of a nail taken from a cross, or else a cord taken from a crucifixion, and after the patient's neck has been freed they hide it in a hole where the sunlight cannot reach.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Cicero, Brutus, 186, 158 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Brutus, 186, 158 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

158. pergamus ergo, inquam, ad reliqua et institutum ordinem persequamur. Paratus igitur veniebat Crassus, exspectabatur, audiebatur; a principio statim, quod erat apud eum semper accuratum, exspectatione dignus videbatur. Non multa iactatio corporis, non inclinatio vocis, nulla inambulatio, non crebra supplosio pedis; vehemens vehemens interdum et irata Campe et interdum irata eL plena iusti doloris oratio, multae et cum gravitate facetiae; quodque difficile est, idem et perornatus et perbrevis; iam in altercando invenit parem neminem.
3. Cicero, De Domo Sua, 140-141, 139 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

139. dum necesse erat resque ipsa cogebat, unus omnia poterat potuerat A ; qui postea quam magistratus creavit legesque constituit, sua cuique procuratio auctoritasque est restituta. quam si retinere volunt volent Richter ei qui reciperarunt in perpetuum poterunt obtinere; sin has caedis et rapinas et hos tantos tamque profusos sumptus aut facient aut approbabunt — nolo in eos gravius quicquam ne ominis ominis Manutius : hominis codd. quidem causa dicere, unum hoc dico: nostri isti nobiles nisi vigilantes et boni et fortes et misericordes erunt, eis hominibus in quibus haec erunt ornamenta sua concedant necesse est.
4. Cicero, De Oratore, 3.196, 3.216, 3.225-3.227 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.196. Itaque non solum verbis arte positis moventur omnes, verum etiam numeris ac vocibus. Quotus enim quisque est qui teneat artem numerorum ac modorum? At in eis si paulum modo offensum est, ut aut contractione brevius fieret aut productione longius, theatra tota reclamant. Quid, hoc non idem fit in vocibus, ut a multitudine et populo non modo catervae atque concentus, sed etiam ipsi sibi singuli discrepantes eiciantur? 3.216. Omnis enim motus animi suum quendam a natura habet vultum et sonum et gestum; corpusque totum hominis et eius omnis vultus omnesque voces, ut nervi in fidibus, ita sot, ut a motu animi quoque sunt pulsae. Nam voces ut chordae sunt intentae, quae ad quemque tactum respondeant, acuta gravis, cita tarda, magna parva; quas tamen inter omnis est suo quoque in genere mediocris, atque etiam illa sunt ab his delapsa plura genera, leve asperum, contractum diffusum, continenti spiritu intermisso, fractum scissum, flexo sono extenuatum inflatum; 3.225. Quid, ad auris nostras et actionis suavitatem quid est vicissitudine et varietate et commutatione aptius? Itaque idem Gracchus, quod potes audire, Catule, ex Licinio cliente tuo, litterato homine, quem servum sibi ille habuit ad manum, cum eburneola solitus est habere fistula qui staret occulte post ipsum, cum contionaretur, peritum hominem, qui inflaret celeriter eum sonum, quo illum aut remissum excitaret aut a contentione revocaret.' 'Audivi me hercule,' inquit Catulus 'et saepe sum admiratus hominis cum diligentiam tum etiam doctrinam et scientiam.' 3.226. 'Ego vero,' inquit Crassus 'ac doleo quidem illos viros in eam fraudem in re publica esse delapsos; quamquam ea tela texitur et ea in civitate ratio vivendi posteritati ostenditur, ut eorum civium, quos nostri patres non tulerunt, iam similis habere cupiamus.' 'Mitte, obsecro,' inquit 'Crasse,' Iulius 'sermonem istum et te ad Gracchi fistulam refer; cuius ego nondum plane rationem intellego.' 3.227. 'In omni voce' inquit Crassus 'est quiddam medium, sed suum cuique voci: hinc gradatim ascendere vocem utile et suave est (nam a principio clamare agreste quiddam est), et idem illud ad firmandam est vocem salutare; deinde est quiddam contentionis extremum, quod tamen interius est, quam acutissimus clamor, quo te fistula progredi non sinet, et iam ab ipsa contentione revocabit; est item contra quiddam in remissione gravissimum quoque tamquam sonorum gradibus descenditur. Haec varietas et hic per omnis sonos vocis cursus et se tuebitur et actioni adferet suavitatem. Sed fistulatorem domi relinquetis, sensum huius consuetudinis vobiscum ad forum deferetis.
5. Cicero, In Pisonem, 18 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Pro Sestio, 66 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.70. 1.  The sixth division of his religious institutions was devoted to those the Romans call Salii, whom Numa himself appointed out of the patricians, choosing twelve young men of the most graceful appearance. These are the Salii whose holy things are deposited on the Palatine hill and who are themselves called the (Salii) Palatini; for the (Salii) Agonales, by some called the Salii Collini, the repository of whose holy things is on the Quirinal hill, were appointed after Numa's time by King Hostilius, in pursuance of a vow he had made in the war against the Sabines. All these Salii are a kind of dancers and singers of hymns in praise of the gods of war.,2.  Their festival falls about the time of the Panathenaea, in the month which they call March, and is celebrated at the public expense for many days, during which they proceed through the city with their dances to the Forum and to the Capitol and to many other places both private and public. They wear embroidered tunics girt about with wide girdles of bronze, and over these are fastened, with brooches, robes striped with scarlet and bordered with purple, which they call trabeae; this garment is peculiar to the Romans and a mark of the greatest honour. On their heads they wear apices, as they are called, that is, high caps contracted into the shape of a cone, which the Greeks call kyrbasiai.,3.  They have each of them a sword hanging at their girdle and in their right hand they hold a spear or a staff or something else of the sort, and on their left arm a Thracian buckler, which resembles a lozenge-shaped shield with its sides drawn in, such as those are said to carry who among the Greeks perform the sacred rites of the Curetes.,4.  And, in my opinion at least, the Salii, if the word be translated into Greek, are Curetes, whom, because they are kouroi or "young men," we call by that name from their age, whereas the Romans call them Salii from their lively motions. For to leap and skip is by them called salire; and for the same reason they call all other dancers saltatores, deriving their name from the Salii, because their dancing also is attended by much leaping and capering.,5.  Whether I have been well advised or not in giving them this appellation, anyone who pleases may gather from their actions. For they execute their movements in arms, keeping time to a flute, sometimes all together, sometimes by turns, and while dancing sing certain traditional hymns. But this dance and exercise performed by armed men and the noise they make by striking their bucklers with their daggers, if we may base any conjectures on the ancient accounts, was originated by the Curetes. I need not mention the legend which is related concerning them, since almost everybody is acquainted with it.
8. Livy, History, 8.9.4, 9.46.6, 10.28.14, 31.9.9, 36.2.3-36.2.5, 41.21.11, 42.28.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Ovid, Fasti, 2.649-2.655 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.649. Then he nurses the first flames with dry bark 2.650. While a boy stands by and holds the wide basket. 2.651. When he’s thrown grain three times into the fire 2.652. The little daughter offers the sliced honeycombs. 2.653. Others carry wine: part of each is offered to the flames: 2.654. The crowd, dressed in white, watch silently. 2.655. Terminus, at the boundary, is sprinkled with lamb’s blood
10. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.670-15.680 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Tibullus, Elegies, 2.2.2-2.2.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 28.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.19.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Seneca The Younger, De Vita Beata (Dialogorum Liber Vii), 26.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Claudius, 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 4.1.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Epigraphy, Illrp, 511



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(mithraic) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 232, 233, 234
apology (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
apuleius, metamorphoses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
apuleius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
authority, religious Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
body (human), and mind/soul Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
charming crops Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
cicero Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145, 146
claudius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
community, community formation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
cult, mysteries, rituals, public/private Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
death, immortality Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
defilement Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
elite, senators Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
eloquentia popularis Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145
emperor, roman Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
fasti Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
favete linguis (animisque) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
festus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
groups, group formation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
inheritance law Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
intent Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
isiac cults Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
magic, magicians, cantamina Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
magic, magicians Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
mind, and the favete linguis (animisque) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
oath Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 234
orality Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 140; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 140
ovid, amores Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
panegyricus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
performance Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
performatives Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 234
piaculum Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
pliny the elder, naturalis historia Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
pliny the elder Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 140; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 140, 146; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
pliny the younger Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
populus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
power, magical Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
power, roman imperial Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
praeire Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145, 146
prayer, preces Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
prayer Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 140; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 140, 145, 146; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
priesthood, arvals Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
priesthood, pontifices Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
priesthood, salii Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
priesthood Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
priests Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
procession Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
purity Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
religion/religious tradition Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
rhetoric, speeches Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
ritual errors Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
ritual knowledge Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
rome, empire Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
sacer' Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
sacred texts Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
sacrifice, and the call favete linguis (animisque) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
sacrifice Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 232, 233, 234; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
sacrifices Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
sanctions Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
senatusconsultum de bacchanalibus Rupke, Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality? (2016) 15
senses, silence Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
suetonius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
taurobolium Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 232, 233, 234
theurgy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
tiberius (emperor) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 234
tongue, regarding the imperative favete linguis (animisque) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110
trajan Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 235
versnel, h.s. Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 232, 234
veyne, p. Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 234
victoria (goddess) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 110