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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 12.111-12.113
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Nehemiah, 5.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.5. וְעַתָּה כִּבְשַׂר אַחֵינוּ בְּשָׂרֵנוּ כִּבְנֵיהֶם בָּנֵינוּ וְהִנֵּה אֲנַחְנוּ כֹבְשִׁים אֶת־בָּנֵינוּ וְאֶת־בְּנֹתֵינוּ לַעֲבָדִים וְיֵשׁ מִבְּנֹתֵינוּ נִכְבָּשׁוֹת וְאֵין לְאֵל יָדֵנוּ וּשְׂדֹתֵינוּ וּכְרָמֵינוּ לַאֲחֵרִים׃ 5.5. Yet now our flesh is as the flesh of our brethren, our children as their children; and, lo, we bring into bondage our sons and our daughters to be servants, and some of our daughters are brought into bondage already; neither is it in our power to help it; for other men have our fields and our vineyards.’"
2. Theophrastus, Research On Plants, 9.6.1-9.6.4 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.114, 2.4.61-2.4.71 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 5.22, 5.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5.22. He pursued them to the gate of Ptolemais, and as many as three thousand of the Gentiles fell, and he despoiled them. 5.52. And they crossed the Jordan into the large plain before Beth-shan.
5. Horace, Sermones, 1.4.94 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 201-202, 200 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

200. and a circumstance which we will now mention, has given him some pretext for carrying out his design.40,200 "There is a city called Jamnia; one of the most populous cities in all Judaea, which is inhabited by a promiscuous multitude, the greatest number of whom are Jews; but there are also some persons of other tribes from the neighbouring nations who have settled there to their own destruction, who are in a manner sojourners among the original native citizens, and who cause them a great deal of trouble, and who do them a great deal of injury, as they are continually violating some of the ancestral national customs of the Jews.
7. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 4.100, 5.77, 5.82, 14.48-14.54, 14.207, 15.95-15.96, 15.217, 17.189, 17.321, 18.31, 18.120-18.122, 18.158-18.163 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.77. for such is the nature of the land of Canaan, that one may see large plains, and such as are exceeding fit to produce fruit, which yet, if they were compared to other parts of the country, might be reckoned exceedingly fruitful; yet, if it be compared with the fields about Jericho, and to those that belong to Jerusalem, will appear to be of no account at all; 5.82. The lot of Simeon, which was the second, included that part of Idumea which bordered upon Egypt and Arabia. As to the Benjamites, their lot fell so, that its length reached from the river Jordan to the sea, but in breadth it was bounded by Jerusalem and Bethel; and this lot was the narrowest of all, by reason of the goodness of the land, for it included Jericho and the city of Jerusalem. 14.48. 4. At this behavior Pompey was angry; and taking with him that army which he was leading against the Nabateans, and the auxiliaries that came from Damascus, and the other parts of Syria, with the other Roman legions which he had with him, he made an expedition against Aristobulus; 14.48. o they were murdered continually in the narrow streets and in the houses by crowds, and as they were flying to the temple for shelter, and there was no pity taken of either infants or the aged, nor did they spare so much as the weaker sex; nay, although the king sent about, and besought them to spare the people, yet nobody restrained their hand from slaughter, but, as if they were a company of madmen, they fell upon persons of all ages, without distinction; 14.49. but as he passed by Pella and Scythopolis, he came to Coreae, which is the first entrance into Judea when one passes over the midland countries, where he came to a most beautiful fortress that was built on the top of a mountain called Alexandrium, whither Aristobulus had fled; and thence Pompey sent his commands to him, that he should come to him. 14.49. in case he had himself offended the Romans by what he had done. Out of Herod’s fear of this it was that he, by giving Antony a great deal of money, endeavored to persuade him to have Antigonus slain, which if it were once done, he should be free from that fear. And thus did the government of the Asamoneans cease, a hundred twenty and six years after it was first set up. This family was a splendid and an illustrious one, both on account of the nobility of their stock, and of the dignity of the high priesthood, as also for the glorious actions their ancestors had performed for our nation; 14.51. and this he did two or three times, as flattering himself with the hopes of having the kingdom granted him; so that he still pretended he would obey Pompey in whatsoever he commanded, although at the same time he retired to his fortress, that he might not depress himself too low, and that he might be prepared for a war, in case it should prove as he feared, that Pompey would transfer the government to Hyrcanus. 14.52. But when Pompey enjoined Aristobulus to deliver up the fortresses he held, and to send an injunction to their governors under his own hand for that purpose, for they had been forbidden to deliver them up upon any other commands, he submitted indeed to do so; but still he retired in displeasure to Jerusalem, and made preparation for war. 14.53. A little after this, certain persons came out of Pontus, and informed Pompey, as he was on the way, and conducting his army against Aristobulus, that Mithridates was dead, and was slain by his son Pharnaces. 14.54. 1. Now when Pompey had pitched his camp at Jericho, (where the palm tree grows, and that balsam which is an ointment of all the most precious, which upon any incision made in the wood with a sharp stone, distills out thence like a juice,) he marched in the morning to Jerusalem. 14.207. It is also the pleasure of the senate, that as to the villages which are in the great plain, which Hyrcanus and his forefathers formerly possessed, Hyrcanus and the Jews have them with the same privileges with which they formerly had them also; 15.95. Thus he gave her the cities that were within the river Eleutherus, as far as Egypt, excepting Tyre and Sidon, which he knew to have been free cities from their ancestors, although she pressed him very often to bestow those on her also. 15.96. 2. When Cleopatra had obtained thus much, and had accompanied Antony in his expedition to Armenia as far as Euphrates, she returned back, and came to Apamia and Damascus, and passed on to Judea, where Herod met her, and farmed of her parts of Arabia, and those revenues that came to her from the region about Jericho. This country bears that balsam, which is the most precious drug that is there, and grows there alone. The place bears also palm trees, both many in number, and those excellent in their kind. 15.217. upon which an honorable employment was bestowed upon him accordingly. Now when Herod was come into Egypt, he was introduced to Caesar with great freedom, as already a friend of his, and received very great favors from him; for he made him a present of those four hundred Galatians who had been Cleopatra’s guards, and restored that country to him again, which, by her means, had been taken away from him. He also added to his kingdom Gadara, Hippos, and Samaria; and, besides those, the maritime cities, Gaza, and Anthedon, and Joppa, and Strato’s Tower. 17.189. He also gave Gaulonitis, and Trachonitis, and Paneas to Philip, who was his son, but own brother to Archelaus by the name of a tetrarchy; and bequeathed Jarnnia, and Ashdod, and Phasaelis to Salome his sister, with five hundred thousand [drachmae] of silver that was coined. 17.321. 5. And so much came to Herod’s sons from their father’s inheritance. But Salome, besides what her brother left her by his testament, which were Jamnia, and Ashdod, and Phasaelis, and five hundred thousand [drachmae] of coined silver, Caesar made her a present of a royal habitation at Askelo; in all, her revenues amounted to sixty talents by the year, and her dwelling-house was within Archelaus’s government. 18.31. A little after which accident Coponius returned to Rome, and Marcus Ambivius came to be his successor in that government; under whom Salome, the sister of king Herod, died, and left to Julia [Caesar’s wife] Jamnia, all its toparchy, and Phasaelis in the plain, and Arehelais, where is a great plantation of palm trees, and their fruit is excellent in its kind. 18.31. 1. A very sad calamity now befell the Jews that were in Mesopotamia, and especially those that dwelt in Babylonia. Inferior it was to none of the calamities which had gone before, and came together with a great slaughter of them, and that greater than any upon record before; concerning all which I shall speak more accurately, and shall explain the occasions whence these miseries came upon them. 18.121. But as he was marching very busily, and leading his army through Judea, the principal men met him, and desired that he would not thus march through their land; for that the laws of their country would not permit them to overlook those images which were brought into it, of which there were a great many in their ensigns; 18.122. o he was persuaded by what they said, and changed that resolution of his which he had before taken in this matter. Whereupon he ordered the army to march along the great plain, while he himself, with Herod the tetrarch and his friends, went up to Jerusalem to offer sacrifice to God, an ancient festival of the Jews being then just approaching; 18.158. Upon the receipt of this money, Agrippa came to Anthedon, and took shipping, and was going to set sail; but Herennius Capito, who was the procurator of Jamnia, sent a band of soldiers to demand of him three hundred thousand drachmae of silver, which were by him owing to Caesar’s treasury while he was at Rome, and so forced him to stay. 18.159. He then pretended that he would do as he bid him; but when night came on, he cut his cables, and went off, and sailed to Alexandria, where he desired Alexander the alabarch to lend him two hundred thousand drachmae; but he said he would not lend it to him, but would not refuse it to Cypros, as greatly astonished at her affection to her husband, and at the other instances of her virtue; 18.161. 4. And now Agrippa was come to Puteoli, whence he wrote a letter to Tiberius Caesar, who then lived at Capreae, and told him that he was come so far in order to wait on him, and to pay him a visit; and desired that he would give him leave to come over to Caprein: 18.162. o Tiberius made no difficulty, but wrote to him in an obliging way in other respects; and withal told him he was glad of his safe return, and desired him to come to Capreae; and when he was come, he did not fail to treat him as kindly as he had promised him in his letter to do. 18.163. But the next day came a letter to Caesar from Herennius Capito, to inform him that Agrippa had borrowed three hundred thousand drachmae, and not pad it at the time appointed; but when it was demanded of him, he ran away like a fugitive, out of the places under his government, and put it out of his power to get the money of him.
8. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.133-1.139, 1.361-1.362, 1.396, 2.98, 2.167, 4.455-4.475 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.133. 5. At this his behavior Pompey had great indignation; Hyrcanus also and his friends made great intercessions to Pompey; so he took not only his Roman forces, but many of his Syrian auxiliaries, and marched against Aristobulus. 1.134. But when he had passed by Pella and Scythopolis, and was come to Corea, where you enter into the country of Judea, when you go up to it through the Mediterranean parts, he heard that Aristobulus was fled to Alexandrium, which is a stronghold, fortified with the utmost magnificence and situated upon a high mountain; and he sent to him, and commanded him to come down. 1.135. Now his inclination was to try his fortune in a battle, since he was called in such an imperious manner, rather than to comply with that call. However, he saw the multitude were in great fear, and his friends exhorted him to consider what the power of the Romans was, and how it was irresistible; so he complied with their advice, and came down to Pompey; and when he had made a long apology for himself, and for the justness of his cause in taking the government, he returned to the fortress. 1.136. And when his brother invited him again [to plead his cause], he came down and spake about the justice of it, and then went away without any hinderance from Pompey; so he was between hope and fear. And when he came down, it was to prevail with Pompey to allow him the government entirely; and when he went up to the citadel, it was that he might not appear to debase himself too low. 1.137. However, Pompey commanded him to give up his fortified places, and forced him to write to every one of their governors to yield them up; they having had this charge given them, to obey no letters but what were of his own handwriting. Accordingly he did what he was ordered to do; but had still an indignation at what was done, and retired to Jerusalem, and prepared to fight with Pompey. 1.138. 6. But Pompey did not give him time to make any preparations [for a siege], but followed him at his heels; he was also obliged to make haste in his attempt, by the death of Mithridates, of which he was informed about Jericho. Now here is the most fruitful country of Judea, which bears a vast number of palm trees besides the balsam tree, whose sprouts they cut with sharp stones, and at the incisions they gather the juice, which drops down like tears. 1.139. So Pompey pitched his camp in that place one night, and then hasted away the next morning to Jerusalem; but Aristobulus was so affrighted at his approach, that he came and met him by way of supplication. He also promised him money, and that he would deliver up both himself and the city into his disposal, and thereby mitigated the anger of Pompey. 1.361. 5. Now as to these her injunctions to Antony, he complied in part; for though he esteemed it too abominable a thing to kill such good and great kings, yet was he thereby alienated from the friendship he had for them. He also took away a great deal of their country; nay, even the plantation of palm trees at Jericho, where also grows the balsam tree, and bestowed them upon her; as also all the cities on this side the river Eleutherus, Tyre and Sidon excepted. 1.362. And when she was become mistress of these, and had conducted Antony in his expedition against the Parthians as far as Euphrates, she came by Apamia and Damascus into Judea and there did Herod pacify her indignation at him by large presents. He also hired of her those places that had been torn away from his kingdom, at the yearly rent of two hundred talents. He conducted her also as far as Pelusium, and paid her all the respects possible. 1.396. for which reason, when Caesar was come into Egypt, and Cleopatra and Antony were dead, he did not only bestow other marks of honor upon him, but made an addition to his kingdom, by giving him not only the country which had been taken from him by Cleopatra, but besides that, Gadara, and Hippos, and Samaria; and moreover, of the maritime cities, Gaza and Anthedon, and Joppa, and Strato’s Tower. 2.98. Salome also, besides what the king had left her in his testaments, was now made mistress of Jamnia, and Ashdod, and Phasaelis. Caesar did moreover bestow upon her the royal palace of Ascalon; by all which she got together a revenue of sixty talents; but he put her house under the ethnarchy of Archelaus. 2.167. 1. And now as the ethnarchy of Archelaus was fallen into a Roman province, the other sons of Herod, Philip, and that Herod who was called Antipas, each of them took upon them the administration of their own tetrarchies; for when Salome died, she bequeathed to Julia, the wife of Augustus, both her toparchy, and Jamnia, as also her plantation of palm trees that were in Phasaelis. 4.455. Now the region that lies in the middle between these ridges of mountains is called the Great Plain; it reaches from the village Ginnabris, as far as the lake Asphaltitis; 4.456. its length is two hundred and thirty furlongs, and its breadth a hundred and twenty, and it is divided in the midst by Jordan. It hath two lakes in it, that of Asphaltitis, and that of Tiberias, whose natures are opposite to each other; for the former is salt and unfruitful, but that of Tiberias is sweet and fruitful. 4.457. This plain is much burnt up in summertime, and, by reason of the extraordinary heat, contains a very unwholesome air; 4.458. it is all destitute of water excepting the river Jordan, which water of Jordan is the occasion why those plantations of palm trees that are near its banks are more flourishing, and much more fruitful, as are those that are remote from it not so flourishing, or fruitful. 4.459. 3. Notwithstanding which, there is a fountain by Jericho, that runs plentifully, and is very fit for watering the ground; it arises near the old city, which Joshua, the son of Nun, the general of the Hebrews, took the first of all the cities of the land of Canaan, by right of war. 4.461. who, when he once was the guest of the people at Jericho, and the men of the place had treated him very kindly, he both made them amends as well as the country, by a lasting favor; 4.462. for he went out of the city to this fountain, and threw into the current an earthen vessel full of salt; after which he stretched out his righteous hand unto heaven, and, pouring out a mild drink-offering, he made this supplication,—That the current might be mollified, and that the veins of fresh water might be opened; 4.463. that God also would bring into the place a more temperate and fertile air for the current, and would bestow upon the people of that country plenty of the fruits of the earth, and a succession of children; and that this prolific water might never fail them, while they continued to be righteous. 4.464. To these prayers Elisha joined proper operations of his hands, after a skillful manner, and changed the fountain; and that water, which had been the occasion of barrenness and famine before, from that time did supply a numerous posterity, and afforded great abundance to the country. 4.465. Accordingly, the power of it is so great in watering the ground, that if it does but once touch a country, it affords a sweeter nourishment than other waters do, when they lie so long upon them, till they are satiated with them. 4.466. For which reason, the advantage gained from other waters, when they flow in great plenty, is but small, while that of this water is great when it flows even in little quantities. 4.467. Accordingly, it waters a larger space of ground than any other waters do, and passes along a plain of seventy furlongs long, and twenty broad; wherein it affords nourishment to those most excellent gardens that are thick set with trees. 4.468. There are in it many sorts of palm trees that are watered by it, different from each other in taste and name; the better sort of them, when they are pressed, yield an excellent kind of honey, not much inferior in sweetness to other honey. 4.469. This country withal produces honey from bees; it also bears that balsam which is the most precious of all the fruits in that place, cypress trees also, and those that bear myrobalanum; so that he who should pronounce this place to be divine would not be mistaken, wherein is such plenty of trees produced as are very rare, and of the most excellent sort. 4.471. the cause of which seems to me to be the warmth of the air, and the fertility of the waters; the warmth calling forth the sprouts, and making them spread, and the moisture making every one of them take root firmly, and supplying that virtue which it stands in need of in summertime. Now this country is then so sadly burnt up, that nobody cares to come at it; 4.472. and if the water be drawn up before sunrising, and after that exposed to the air, it becomes exceeding cold, and becomes of a nature quite contrary to the ambient air; 4.473. as in winter again it becomes warm; and if you go into it, it appears very gentle. The ambient air is here also of so good a temperature, that the people of the country are clothed in linen-only, even when snow covers the rest of Judea. 4.474. This place is one hundred and fifty furlongs from Jerusalem, and sixty from Jordan. The country, as far as Jerusalem, is desert and stony; but that as far as Jordan and the lake Asphaltitis lies lower indeed, though it be equally desert and barren. 4.475. But so much shall suffice to have been said about Jericho, and of the great happiness of its situation.
9. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 12.112-12.123, 16.200, 36.37-36.38 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Tacitus, Agricola, 10.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Tacitus, Histories, 5.4.3, 5.6.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.10.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.8.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

55.8.4.  The Diribitorium was the largest building under a single roof ever constructed; indeed, now that the whole covering has been destroyed, the edifice is wide open to the sky, since it could not be put together again. Agrippa had left it still in process of construction, and it was completed at this time. The portico in the Campus, however, which was being built by Polla, Agrippa's sister, who also adorned the race-courses, was not yet finished.
14. Obsequens, De Prodigiis, 57 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agriculture, economic importance of Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
alexander the great, and thebes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
anthropogeography Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
antisemitism Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
antius, sp. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
askhelon Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
athenodorus of rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
babatha archive Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
balsam Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43; Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
barley Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
britannia, britons Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
cloelius tullus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
cornelius scipio africanus, p., his house Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
dead sea Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89; Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
debt-slavery Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80
economy, of roman palestine Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
egypt Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
ein-gedi Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
elites, creditors Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80
elites Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80
estates, private Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
estates, royal Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80
ethnography Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
favors, of caesar Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
fidenae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
forgotten things Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
fulcinius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
gleanings Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
gomorrah Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
grants, territorial Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
grapes Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
great plain, identification of, as jordan valley Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
great plain, identification of, as plain of sharon Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
great plain, in josephus Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
great plain Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
hagesander Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
inimicitia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
jamnia Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
jericho, date and balsam plantations in Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
jericho Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80, 90
jerusalem, temple sacked Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
jerusalem, temples treasures Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
jerusalem Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
jewish state, and caesar Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
jewish state, restitution of territory to, by c. Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
joppa, caesars territorial grant of Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
josephus, on jewish state, grants to, by caesar Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
josephus, on territorial grants Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
josephus Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
judaea Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
judea Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
julius caesar, and jews, decrees of c. concerning jewish state Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
julius caesar, favors of Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
land tenancy Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80
landowners, tenants' Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80
laocoön, the Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
legumes Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
livia, wife of augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
livius drusus, m., his house Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
lysippus, his apoxyomenos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
lysippus, his granicus group Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
misanthropy Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
museum, the vatican museum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
nero, builds amphiteatre of wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
objects, profane versus sacred Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
objects, their public versus private context Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75, 76
olive oil Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
olives Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
peah Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
phasaelis Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
pliny the elder, on the laocoön Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
pliny the elder, the natural history Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
pliny the elder Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
polydorus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
poor, in roman palestine Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
poor tithe Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
ptolemies Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
rome, baths of agrippa Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
rome, capitoline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
rome, diribitorium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
rome, naumachia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
rome, palatine hill, and the imperial collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
rome, portico of metellus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
rome, rostrum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
rome, temple of divus augustus, cinnamon dedicated in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, cinnamon dedicated in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
rome, temple of peace, crown of cinnamon in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
rome, theatre of pompey, flora collected in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
roscius, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75
sabbath Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
sabbatical year Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
seleucids Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
semiotics Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
sharon, plain of, as great plain Udoh, To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E (2006) 66
sodom Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
suiones Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 89
tiberius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 75, 214
titus, his triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
trees, balsam Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
trees, larch Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
trees Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
vergil Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 76
vespasian, his triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
vespasian Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 90
vipsanius agrippa, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 214
wadi daliyeh Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80
wheat Gardner, The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism (2015) 43
yehud Keddie, Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins (2019) 80