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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9458
Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 11.77


nanSnakes and lizards have long internal organs. There is a record that when a person at Volaterrae named Caecina was performing a sacrifice, some snakes darted out from the internal organs of the victim — a joyful portent; and indeed it would seem nothing incredible to those considering that on the day on which King Pyrrhus died the heads of his victims when cut off crawled about licking up their own blood. In man the chief internal organs are separated from the lower part of the viscera by a membrane which is called the praecordia (diaphragm), because it is stretched prae (in front of) the cor (heart): the Greek word for it is phrenes. Indeed provident Nature has enclosed all the principal internal organs with special membranes serving as sheaths; but in the case of this membrane a special cause also was the proximity of the bowels, to prevent the food from pressing down on the vital principle. To this membrane unquestionably is due the subtlety of the intellect; it consequently has no flesh, but is of a spare sinewy substance. In it also is the chief seat of merriment, a fact that is gathered chiefly from tickling the armpits to which it rises, as nowhere else is the human skin thinner, and consequently the pleasure of scratching is closest there. On this account there have been cases in battle and in gladiatorial shows of death caused by piercing the diaphragm that has been accompanied by laughter.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Horace, Sermones, 1.2.101-1.2.103 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 4.1130 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Amores, 1.5.9-1.5.14, 1.7.47-1.7.48, 3.1.7-3.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.32, 2.297-2.302, 3.169-3.192, 3.273 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Fasti, 1.405-1.410, 2.319-2.324 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.405. There were Naiads too, some with uncombed flowing hair 1.406. Others with their tresses artfully bound. 1.407. One attends with tunic tucked high above the knee 1.408. Another shows her breast through her loosened robe: 1.409. One bares her shoulder: another trails her hem in the grass 1.410. Their tender feet are not encumbered with shoes. 2.319. She gave him thin vests dyed in Gaetulian purple 2.320. Gave him the elegant zone that had bound her waist. 2.321. The zone was too small for his belly, and he unfastened 2.322. The clasps of the vests to thrust out his great hands. 2.323. He fractured her bracelets, not made for such arms 2.324. And his giant feet split the little shoes.
6. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.15, 4.5.57, 4.7.40-4.7.41, 4.11.61 (1st cent. BCE

7. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.10.61, 2.3.53-2.3.54, 2.4.29-2.4.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.215-4.217, 9.616 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age
9. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.360-2.364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Persius, Satires, 5.135 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Persius, Saturae, 5.135 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 11.76, 33.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aristotle Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 386, 390
asia, continent and region, central Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
attacori Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
bactria Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
china, chinese Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
china Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 386
chryse, cape Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
coa vestis Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 386, 389, 390
cos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
epicurean doctrine Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 390
epigram (literary genre) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
flavian period (literature, dress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 389
fortunata (wife of trimalchio) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
ganges river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
hyperboreans Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
india, trade with Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
jeunesse dorée Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 386
lucretius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 390
luxury Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 386
marcia Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
martial Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
matrona Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 389
merchants (meretrix (prostitute) ( Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 389
mitra (headscarf) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
naked Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 389
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 386, 389, 390
ovid Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
petronius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
propertius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
seleucid period Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
seres Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
silk' Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
silk Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 386, 389, 390
silk worm Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 386
stereotypes vii Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 390
synthesis (garment) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
thina Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
thuni Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
toarci (tochari) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 343
trica (triclinium (trimalchio Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
valerius maximus Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
veil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
weave Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 389
wool, woollen Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222