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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9421
Plato, Statesman, 269
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 19 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

19. And fair Dione, Leto, Iapeto
2. Homer, Odyssey, 9.14 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

33c. to spend much of their time with me? You have heard the reason, men of Athens ; for I told you the whole truth; it is because they like to listen when those are examined who think they are wise and are not so; for it is amusing. But, as I believe, I have been commanded to do this by the God through oracles and dreams and in every way in which any man was ever commanded by divine power to do anything whatsoever. This, Athenians, is true and easily tested. For if I am corrupting some of the young men
4. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

425d. Socrates. It will, I imagine, seem ridiculous that things are made manifest through imitation in letters and syllables; nevertheless it cannot be otherwise. For there is no better theory upon which we can base the truth of the earliest names, unless you think we had better follow the example of the tragic poets, who, when they are in a dilemma, have recourse to the introduction of gods on machines. So we may get out of trouble by saying that the gods gave the earliest names, and therefore they are right.
5. Plato, Critias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

106b. and, if unwittingly we have spoken aught discordantly, that he will impose the fitting penalty. And the correct penalty is to bring into tune him that is out of tune. In order, then, that for the future we may declare the story of the birth of the gods aright, we pray that he will grant to us that medicine which of all medicines is the most perfect and most good, even knowledge; and having made our prayer, we deliver over to Critias, in accordance with our compact, the task of speaking next in order. Crit. And I accept the task, Timaeus; but the request which you yourself made at the beginning
6. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

86b. in our soul, then the soul must be immortal; so that you should take heart and, whatever you do not happen to know at present—that is, what you do not remember—you must endeavor to search out and recollect? Men. What you say commends itself to me, Socrates, I know not how. Soc. And so it does to me, Meno. Most of the points I have made in support of my argument are not such as I can confidently assert; but that the belief in the duty of inquiring after what we do not know will make us better and braver and less helpless than the notion that there is not even a possibility of discovering what we do not know
8. Plato, Parmenides, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

130b. he said, what an admirable talent for argument you have! Tell me, did you invent this distinction yourself, which separates abstract ideas from the things which partake of them? And do you think there is such a thing as abstract likeness apart from the likeness which we possess, and abstract one and many, and the other abstractions of which you heard Zeno speaking just now?
9. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plato, Philebus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20b. Soc. I need no longer anticipate anything terrible, since you put it in that way; for the words in case you are willing relieve me of all fear. And besides, I think some god has given me a vague recollection. Pro. How is that, and what is the recollection about? Soc. I remember now having heard long ago in a dream, or perhaps when I was awake, some talk about pleasure and wisdom to the effect that neither of the two is the good, but some third thing, different from them and better than both.
12. Plato, Statesman, 271-274, 270 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

500c. to turn his eyes downward upon the petty affairs of men, and so engaging in strife with them to be filled with envy and hate, but he fixes his gaze upon the things of the eternal and unchanging order, and seeing that they neither wrong nor are wronged by one another, but all abide in harmony as reason bids, he will endeavor to imitate them and, as far as may be, to fashion himself in their likeness and assimilate himself to them. Or do you think it possible not to imitate the things to which anyone attaches himself with admiration? Impossible, he said. Then the lover of wisdom
15. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

27c. Tim. Nay, as to that, Socrates, all men who possess even a small share of good sense call upon God always at the outset of every undertaking, be it small or great; we therefore who are purposing to deliver a discourse concerning the Universe, how it was created or haply is uncreate, must needs invoke Gods and Goddesses (if so be that we are not utterly demented), praying that all we say may be approved by them in the first place, and secondly by ourselves. Grant, then, that we have thus duly invoked the deities;
18. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.197 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.197. Was set within my breast, and it bade me
19. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 5.925-5.926 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

20. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 90 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adam Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
apocalyptic / apocalypticism Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
bluck, r. s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
cronus Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
cultural memory, polis model Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
destruction Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
eve Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
fraenkel, carlos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
golden age Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
graeco-roman, literature Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
hephaestus Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
homer Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
morgan, michael l. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
muses Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
odysseus Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
partenie, catalin Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
philosophy Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato, apology Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato, doctrine of the forms Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato, ethics Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato, laws Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato, meno Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato, myths Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
plato, theaetetus Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato, theory of recollection Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
plato Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217; Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
prophecies Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
religion/theology, polis religion' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 217
sibyl Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
sin Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
theology, reflection in judaeo-christian terms Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122