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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9365
Pindar, Pythian Odes, 11.11
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 1.40, 3.306-3.310, 4.263-4.264, 4.546-4.547, 11.410-11.411 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 226-274, 225 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

225. Among the gods their dear son as he played
3. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 165 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

165. ἑπτάπυλον ἕδος ἐπιρρύου. Χορός 165. defend your seven- gated home! Chorus
4. Pindar, Paeanes, 7, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 11.1-11.2 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 860 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

860. ἴττω ̔Ηρακλῆς ἔκαμόν γα τὰν τύλαν κακῶς:
7. Herodotus, Histories, 8.133-8.135 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.133. The Greeks, then, sailed to Delos, and Mardonius wintered in Thessaly. Having his headquarters there he sent a man of Europus called Mys to visit the places of divination, charging him to inquire of all the oracles which he could test. What it was that he desired to learn from the oracles when he gave this charge, I cannot say, for no one tells of it. I suppose that he sent to inquire concerning his present business, and that alone. 8.134. This man Mys is known to have gone to Lebadea and to have bribed a man of the country to go down into the cave of Trophonius and to have gone to the place of divination at Abae in Phocis. He went first to Thebes where he inquired of Ismenian Apollo (sacrifice is there the way of divination, as at Olympia), and moreover he bribed one who was no Theban but a stranger to lie down to sleep in the shrine of Amphiaraus. ,No Theban may seek a prophecy there, for Amphiaraus bade them by an oracle to choose which of the two they wanted and forgo the other, and take him either for their prophet or for their ally. They chose that he should be their ally. Therefore no Theban may lie down to sleep in that place. 8.135. But at this time there happened, as the Thebans say, a thing at which I marvel greatly. It would seem that this man Mys of Europus came in his wanderings among the places of divination to the precinct of Ptoan Apollo. This temple is called Ptoum, and belongs to the Thebans. It lies by a hill, above lake Copais, very near to the town Acraephia. ,When the man called Mys entered into this temple together with three men of the town who were chosen on the state's behalf to write down the oracles that should be given, straightway the diviner prophesied in a foreign tongue. ,The Thebans who followed him were astonished to hear a strange language instead of Greek and knew not what this present matter might be. Mys of Europus, however, snatched from them the tablet which they carried and wrote on it that which was spoken by the prophet, saying that the words of the oracle were Carian. After writing everything down, he went back to Thessaly.
8. Sophocles, Antigone, 101-140, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Xenophon, Hellenica, 3.5.1, 6.4.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.5.1. But now Tithraustes, who thought he had found out that Agesilaus despised the power of the King and did not in the least intend to depart from Asia, but rather had great hopes that he would overcome the King, being perplexed to know how to deal with the situation, sent Timocrates the Rhodian to Greece, giving him gold to the value of fifty talents of silver, and bade him undertake, on receipt of the surest pledges, to give this money to the leaders in the various states on condition that they 395 B.C. should make war upon the Lacedaemonians. So Timocrates went and gave his money, at Thebes to Androcleidas, Ismenias, and Galaxidorus; at Corinth to Timolaus and Polyanthes; and at Argos to Cylon and his followers. 6.4.7. Besides this, they were also somewhat encouraged by the oracle which was reported — that the Lacedaemonians were destined to be defeated at the spot where stood the monument of the virgins, who are said to have killed themselves because they had been violated by certain Lacedaemonians. The Thebans accordingly decorated this monument before the battle. Furthermore, reports were brought to them 371 B.C. from the city that all the temples were opening of themselves, and that the priestesses said that the gods revealed victory. And the messengers reported that from the Heracleium the arms also had disappeared, indicating that Heracles had gone forth to the battle. Some, to be sure, say that all these things were but devices of the leaders.
10. Plutarch, Sayings of The Spartans, 19.1-19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19.1. Archidamus, the son of Zeuxidamus, when someone inquired of him who were at the head of Sparta, said, The laws and the magistrates in accordance with the laws. 19.2. In answer to a man who praised a harper and expressed amazement at his ability, he said, My good sir, what honours shall you be able to offer to good men when you have such praise for a harper?
11. Plutarch, Aristides, 19.1-19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.8.4, 9.10.2-9.10.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.8.4. In the circuit of the ancient wall of Thebes were gates seven in number, and these remain to-day. One got its name, I learned, from Electra, the sister of Cadmus, and another, the Proetidian, from a native of Thebes . He was Proetus, but I found it difficult to discover his date and lineage. The Neistan gate, they say, got its name for the following reason. The last of the harp's strings they call nete, and Amphion invented it, they say, at this gate. I have also heard that the son of Zethus, the brother of Amphion, was named Neis, and that after him was this gate called. 9.10.2. On the right of the gate is a hill sacred to Apollo. Both the hill and the god are called Ismenian, as the river Ismenus Rows by the place. First at the entrance are Athena and Hermes, stone figures and named Pronai (of the fore-temple). The Hermes is said to have been made by Pheidias, the Athena by Scopas. The temple is built behind. The image is in size equal to that at Branchidae ; and does not differ from it at all in shape. Whoever has seen one of these two images, and learnt who was the artist, does not need much skill to discern, when he looks at the other, that it is a work of Canachus. The only difference is that the image at Branchidae is of bronze, while the Ismenian is of cedar-wood. 9.10.3. Here there is a stone, on which, they say, used to sit Manto, the daughter of Teiresias. This stone lies before the entrance, and they still call it Manto's chair. On the right of the temple are statues of women made of stone, said to be portraits of Henioche and Pyrrha, daughters of Creon, who reigned as guardian of Laodamas, the son of Eteocles. 9.10.4. The following custom is, to my knowledge, still carried out in Thebes . A boy of noble family, who is himself both handsome and strong, is chosen priest of Ismenian Apollo for a year. He is called Laurel-bearer, for the boys wear wreaths of laurel leaves. I cannot say for certain whether all alike who have worn the laurel dedicate by custom a bronze tripod to the god; but I do not think that it is the rule for all, because I did not see many votive tripods there. But the wealthier of the boys do certainly dedicate them. Most remarkable both for its age and for the fame of him who dedicated it is a tripod dedicated by Amphitryon for Heracles after he had worn the laurel. 9.10.5. Higher up than the Ismenian sanctuary you may see the fountain which they say is sacred to Ares, and they add that a dragon was posted by Ares as a sentry over the spring. By this fountain is the grave of Caanthus. They say that he was brother to Melia and son to Ocean, and that he was commissioned by his father to seek his sister, who had been carried away. Finding that Apollo had Melia, and being unable to get her from him, he dared to set fire to the precinct of Apollo that is now called the Ismenian sanctuary. The god, according to the Thebans, shot him.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, and electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
aetiologies, specific, apollo ismenios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374, 375
akraiphia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
alkmene Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373
antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
antigone (sophocles), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
apollo ismenios (thebes), aetiology of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374, 375
apollo ismenios (thebes), and boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
apollo ismenios (thebes), and musical innovation Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
apollo ismenios (thebes), archaeology of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372
apollo ismenios (thebes), civic role of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
apollo ismenios (thebes), divination at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374
apollo ismenios (thebes), myth-ritual nexus of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374, 375
apollo ismenios (thebes), priest of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373
apollo ismenios (thebes), songs for Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
apollo ismenios (thebes) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
apollo pto(i)os, ptoieus, cult song for Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
apollo pto(i)os, ptoieus Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 375
apollo pythios (delphi), apollo tegyraios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
apollo pythios (delphi), thilphousaios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
apollo pythios (delphi), thourios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
argos (without epithet), linking boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
athena itonia, and boiotian (warrior) identity Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
athena pronaia, ismenion Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372
athens, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
bacchylides, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
battle of delium Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
birth (mythical), as myth-ritual nexus Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374, 375
catalog of women, the (hesiod), and electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
choregia, mythical past and ritual present merging in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373, 374
cult centres, local and regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
democracy, in athens, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
electra (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
epinikion, as religious song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 374
euripides, and electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
euripides, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
hesiod, and electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
insular, regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
lebadeia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
libation bearers, the (aeschylus), and electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
locality, orchestration of religious Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373, 374, 375
melia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374
memories, social, appropriated in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 375
migrations, myths of, boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
mousike, music, and social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
myndos, mys, oracular tour of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
myth, of orestes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
myth-ritual nexus, ritual moment Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374, 375
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), and regional integration (kopais) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), one replaced by another Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
odyssey (homer), and electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
oedipus, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
oedipus at colonus (sophocles), and geography Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
oedipus the king (sophocles), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
partheneia, pindars Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
past, mythical, monumentalization of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
past, mythical, unified in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373, 375
pausanias (author) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373
peloponnesian war, and the image of thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
performances of myth and ritual (also song), (re)creation of worshipping groups Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
performances of myth and ritual (also song), embracing social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
pindar, and electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
pindar, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
plataea, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
polynices (oedipuss son) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
poseidon, at onkhestos, and boiotian koinon Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
pto(i)os, hero Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
pyrrhe Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 374
region, as religious system Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
region, integration of in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
returns from troy, the Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
sanctuaries, controversial control of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
semele Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373, 374
sequence, mythic, of electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
seven against thebes (aeschylus), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
sikyon Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
stesichorus of himera, and electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 493
suppliants, the (euripides), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
tegyra, apollos oracle at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
telphousa, tilphousa, spring Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
teneros, theban hero, and theban appropriation of kopais traditions Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
teneros, theban hero, birth of at ismenion Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 372, 373, 374, 375
teneros, theban hero Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 375
thebes, adopting thessalian kopais traditions through song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
thebes, appropriating migration myths in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371
thebes, mythic image of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
thero Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
thessalians Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 371, 372, 373, 374, 375
thoudippos decree, thourion, apollo at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
trophonios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375
victor, of epinikian odes, protected by local deity Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 373, 374, 375
votives, votive offerings, alluding to specific myth-ritual nexus' Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 374
votives, votive offerings, mythical Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 375