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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9362
Pindar, Olympian Odes, 9.43-9.46
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 8.21 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8.21. וַיָּרַח יְהוָה אֶת־רֵיחַ הַנִּיחֹחַ וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־לִבּוֹ לֹא־אֹסִף לְקַלֵּל עוֹד אֶת־הָאֲדָמָה בַּעֲבוּר הָאָדָם כִּי יֵצֶר לֵב הָאָדָם רַע מִנְּעֻרָיו וְלֹא־אֹסִף עוֹד לְהַכּוֹת אֶת־כָּל־חַי כַּאֲשֶׁר עָשִׂיתִי׃ 8.21. And the LORD smelled the sweet savour; and the LORD said in His heart: ‘I will not again curse the ground any more for man’s sake; for the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done."
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 102-201, 61, 101 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

101. Men age. Pandora took out of the jar
3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 9.32-9.33, 9.35-9.42, 9.44-9.53 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.165-1.166, 1.263-1.264, 2.644-2.654, 2.991-2.997, 5.411-5.415, 5.783-5.805, 5.925-5.926, 5.1241-5.1242, 5.1281-5.1296, 6.379-6.422 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vergil, Georgics, 1.60-1.63, 1.316-1.334, 2.323-2.345 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 2.323. A glance will serve to warn thee which is black 2.324. Or what the hue of any. But hard it i 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.329. Regarding, let your land, ay, long before 2.330. Scorch to the quick, and into trenches carve 2.331. The mighty mountains, and their upturned clod 2.332. Bare to the north wind, ere thou plant therein 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.335. And bitter hoar-frosts, and the delver's toil 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.344. As erst it stood, here bore the southern heats 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole;
6. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.6.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.6.2. μετʼ οὐ πολὺ δὲ κλαπεισῶν ἐξ Εὐβοίας ὑπὸ Αὐτολύκου βοῶν, Εὔρυτος μὲν ἐνόμιζεν ὑφʼ Ἡρακλέους γεγονέναι τοῦτο, Ἴφιτος δὲ ἀπιστῶν ἀφικνεῖται πρὸς Ἡρακλέα, καὶ συντυχὼν ἥκοντι ἐκ Φερῶν 2 -- αὐτῷ, σεσωκότι τὴν ἀποθανοῦσαν Ἄλκηστιν Ἀδμήτῳ, παρακαλεῖ συζητῆσαι τὰς βόας. Ἡρακλῆς δὲ ὑπισχνεῖται· καὶ ξενίζει μὲν αὐτόν, μανεὶς δὲ αὖθις ἀπὸ τῶν Τιρυνθίων ἔρριψεν αὐτὸν τειχῶν. καθαρθῆναι δὲ θέλων τὸν φόνον ἀφικνεῖται πρὸς Νηλέα· Πυλίων ἦν οὗτος δυνάστης. ἀπωσαμένου δὲ Νηλέως αὐτὸν διὰ τὴν πρὸς Εὔρυτον φιλίαν, εἰς Ἀμύκλας παραγενόμενος ὑπὸ Δηιφόβου τοῦ Ἱππολύτου καθαίρεται. κατασχεθεὶς δὲ δεινῇ νόσῳ διὰ τὸν Ἰφίτου φόνον, εἰς Δελφοὺς παραγενόμενος ἀπαλλαγὴν ἐπυνθάνετο τῆς νόσου. μὴ χρησμῳδούσης δὲ αὐτῷ τῆς Πυθίας τόν τε ναὸν συλᾶν ἤθελε, καὶ τὸν τρίποδα βαστάσας κατασκευάζειν 1 -- μαντεῖον ἴδιον. μαχομένου δὲ αὐτῷ Ἀπόλλωνος, ὁ Ζεὺς ἵησι μέσον αὐτῶν κεραυνόν. καὶ τοῦτον διαλυθέντων τὸν τρόπον, λαμβάνει χρησμὸν Ἡρακλῆς, ὃς ἔλεγεν ἀπαλλαγὴν αὐτῷ τῆς νόσου ἔσεσθαι πραθέντι καὶ τρία ἔτη λατρεύσαντι καὶ δόντι ποινὴν τοῦ φόνου τὴν τιμὴν Εὐρύτῳ.
7. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.13.7-10.13.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.13.7. Heracles and Apollo are holding on to the tripod, and are preparing to fight about it. Leto and Artemis are calming Apollo, and Athena is calming Heracles. This too is an offering of the Phocians, dedicated when Tellias of Elis led them against the Thessalians. Athena and Artemis were made by Chionis, the other images are works shared by Diyllus and Amyclaeus. They are said to be Corinthians. 10.13.8. The Delphians say that when Heracles the son of Amphitryon came to the oracle, the prophetess Xenocleia refused to give a response on the ground that he was guilty of the death of Iphitus. Whereupon Heracles took up the tripod and carried it out of the temple. Then the prophetess said:— Then there was another Heracles, of Tiryns, not the Canopian. For before this the Egyptian Heracles had visited Delphi . On the occasion to which I refer the son of Amphitryon restored the tripod to Apollo, and was told by Xenocleia all he wished to know. The poets adopted the story, and sing about a fight between Heracles and Apollo for a tripod.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 60
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
ages, myths of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 202
anthropogony Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 115
ararat Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112
argonautica and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 60
artemis Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
atrahasis Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112, 115
critias, and solons genealogies Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 113
delphi Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
deucalion Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
deucalion and pyrrha Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 202
deukalion Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112, 115
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 60, 61
flood, and sacrifice Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112
flood Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112, 115
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
hades Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
herakles/heracles/hercules, and delphic tripod Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
herakles/heracles/hercules, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
hermes, as cattle thief Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
hesiod, myth of the races in Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 45
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 45
hieros gamos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
himalayas Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112
hosioi Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 115
jahweh Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
kings' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 115
leleges Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 115
locris Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 115
lucretius, account of early man Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 45
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
nimush Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112
opuntians Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 115
parnassus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112
pelasgians Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 115
phanes Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 202
pindar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
praise of spring Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
pyrrha/aia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 112, 115
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
selloi Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 60
siphnian treasury Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 57
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
themis, themis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 60
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117