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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Pindar, Olympian Odes, 7.68-7.69
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15 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.341, 3.73, 3.94, 3.256, 3.323, 4.159, 7.408-7.412, 9.132, 9.274, 10.321-10.332, 14.271, 15.36-15.38, 19.113 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.341. /Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose 3.73. /to do battle for Helen and all her possessions. And whichsoever of us twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home. But for you others, do ye swear friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice. So should ye dwell in deep-soiled Troyland, and let them return 3.94. /and himself in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares, to do battle for Helen and all her possessions. And whichsoever of the twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home; but for us others, let us swear friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice. 3.256. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.323. / Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, whichsoever of the twain it be that brought these troubles upon both peoples, grant that he may die and enter the house of Hades, whereas to us there may come friendship and oaths of faith. So spake they, and great Hector of the flashing helm shook the helmet 4.159. / Dear brother, it was for thy death, meseems, that I swore this oath with sacrifice, setting thee forth alone before the face of the Achaeans to do battle with the Trojans, seeing the Trojans have thus smitten thee, and trodden under foot the oaths of faith. Yet in no wise is an oath of none effect and the blood of lambs and drink-offerings of unmixed wine and the hand-clasps, wherein we put our trust. 7.408. /Then to Idaeus spake lord Agamemnon:Idaeus, verily of thyself thou hearest the word of the Achaeans, how they make answer to thee; and mine own pleasure is even as theirs. But as touching the dead I in no wise grudge that ye burn them; for to dead corpses should no man grudge 7.409. /Then to Idaeus spake lord Agamemnon:Idaeus, verily of thyself thou hearest the word of the Achaeans, how they make answer to thee; and mine own pleasure is even as theirs. But as touching the dead I in no wise grudge that ye burn them; for to dead corpses should no man grudge 7.410. /when once they are dead, the speedy consolation of fire. But to our oaths let Zeus be witness, the loud-thundering lord of Hera. So saying, he lifted up his staff before the face of all the gods, and Idaeus went his way back to sacred Ilios. Now they were sitting in assembly, Trojans and Dardanians alike 7.411. /when once they are dead, the speedy consolation of fire. But to our oaths let Zeus be witness, the loud-thundering lord of Hera. So saying, he lifted up his staff before the face of all the gods, and Idaeus went his way back to sacred Ilios. Now they were sitting in assembly, Trojans and Dardanians alike 7.412. /when once they are dead, the speedy consolation of fire. But to our oaths let Zeus be witness, the loud-thundering lord of Hera. So saying, he lifted up his staff before the face of all the gods, and Idaeus went his way back to sacred Ilios. Now they were sitting in assembly, Trojans and Dardanians alike 9.132. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.274. /And he will give seven women skilled in goodly handiwork, women of Lesbos, whom on the day when thou thyself tookest well-built Lesbos he chose him from the spoil, and that in beauty surpassed all women folk. These will he give thee, and amid them shall be she whom he then took away, the daughter of Briseus; and he will furthermore swear a great oath 10.321. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.322. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.323. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.324. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.325. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.326. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.327. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.328. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.329. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.330. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 10.331. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 10.332. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 14.271. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 15.36. /and she spake and addressed him with winged words:Hereto now be Earth my witness and the broad Heaven above, and the down-flowing water of Styx, which is the greatest and most dread oath for the blessed gods, and thine own sacred head, and the couch of us twain, couch of our wedded love 15.37. /and she spake and addressed him with winged words:Hereto now be Earth my witness and the broad Heaven above, and the down-flowing water of Styx, which is the greatest and most dread oath for the blessed gods, and thine own sacred head, and the couch of us twain, couch of our wedded love 15.38. /and she spake and addressed him with winged words:Hereto now be Earth my witness and the broad Heaven above, and the down-flowing water of Styx, which is the greatest and most dread oath for the blessed gods, and thine own sacred head, and the couch of us twain, couch of our wedded love 19.113. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 2.377, 4.354-4.357, 5.178, 5.184-5.186, 8.487-8.491, 10.299, 10.343, 20.229 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 85-86, 84 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

84. For many-footed creatures of the sea
4. Pindar, Isthmian Odes, 2.9-2.11, 6.8 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.92, 6.89-6.90, 7.1-7.12, 7.16-7.17, 7.24, 7.32, 7.35-7.67, 7.69-7.71, 7.77-7.80, 7.84, 7.89, 8.4, 8.7 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, Peace, 410-413, 409 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

409. ἵνα δὴ τί τοῦτο δρᾶτον; ὁτιὴ νὴ Δία
7. Herodotus, Histories, 1.131, 2.10, 7.37, 7.54, 7.153 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.131. As to the customs of the Persians, I know them to be these. It is not their custom to make and set up statues and temples and altars, but those who do such things they think foolish, because, I suppose, they have never believed the gods to be like men, as the Greeks do; ,but they call the whole circuit of heaven Zeus, and to him they sacrifice on the highest peaks of the mountains; they sacrifice also to the sun and moon and earth and fire and water and winds. ,From the beginning, these are the only gods to whom they have ever sacrificed; they learned later to sacrifice to the “heavenly” Aphrodite from the Assyrians and Arabians. She is called by the Assyrians Mylitta, by the Arabians Alilat, by the Persians Mitra. 2.10. The greater portion, then, of this country of which I have spoken was land deposited for the Egyptians as the priests told me, and I myself formed the same judgment; all that lies between the ranges of mountains above Memphis to which I have referred seemed to me to have once been a gulf of the sea, just as the country about Ilion and Teuthrania and Ephesus and the plain of the Maeander, to compare these small things with great. ,For of the rivers that brought down the stuff to make these lands, there is none worthy to be compared for greatness with even one of the mouths of the Nile, and the Nile has five mouths. ,There are also other rivers, not so great as the Nile, that have had great effects; I could rehearse their names, but principal among them is the Achelous, which, flowing through Acaria and emptying into the sea, has already made half of the Echinades Islands mainland. 7.37. When the bridges and the work at Athos were ready, and both the dikes at the canal's entrances, built to prevent the surf from silting up the entrances of the dug passage, and the canal itself were reported to be now completely finished, the army then wintered. At the beginning of spring the army made ready and set forth from Sardis to march to Abydos. ,As it was setting out, the sun left his place in the heaven and was invisible, although the sky was without clouds and very clear, and the day turned into night. When Xerxes saw and took note of that, he was concerned and asked the Magi what the vision might signify. ,They declared to him that the god was showing the Greeks the abandonment of their cities; for the sun (they said) was the prophet of the Greeks, as the moon was their own. Xerxes rejoiced exceedingly to hear that and continued on his march. 7.54. All that day they made preparations for the crossing. On the next they waited until they could see the sun rise, burning all kinds of incense on the bridges and strewing the road with myrtle boughs. ,At sunrise Xerxes poured a libation from a golden phial into the sea, praying to the sun that no accident might befall him which would keep him from subduing Europe before he reached its farthest borders. After the prayer, he cast the phial into the Hellespont, and along with it a golden bowl, and a Persian sword which they call “acinaces.” ,As for these, I cannot rightly determine whether he cast them into the sea for offerings to the sun, or repented having whipped the Hellespont and gave gifts to the sea as atonement. 7.153. Such is the end of the story of the Argives. As for Sicily, envoys were sent there by the allies to hold converse with Gelon, Syagrus from Lacedaemon among them. The ancestor of this Gelon, who settled at Gela, was from the island of Telos which lies off Triopium. When the founding of Gela by Antiphemus and the Lindians of Rhodes was happening, he would not be left behind. ,His descendants in time became and continue to be priests of the goddesses of the underworld; this office had been won, as I will show, by Telines, one of their forefathers. There were certain Geloans who had been worsted in party strife and had been banished to the town of Mactorium, inland of Gela. ,These men Telines brought to Gela with no force of men but only the holy instruments of the goddesses worship to aid him. From where he got these, and whether or not they were his own invention, I cannot say; however that may be, it was in reliance upon them that he restored the exiles, on the condition that his descendants should be ministering priests of the goddesses. ,Now it makes me marvel that Telines should have achieved such a feat, for I have always supposed that such feats cannot be performed by any man but only by such as have a stout heart and manly strength. Telines, however, is reported by the dwellers in Sicily to have had a soft and effeminate disposition.
8. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.4.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.4.3. Gela was founded by Antiphemus from Rhodes and Entimus from Crete, who joined in leading a colony thither, in the forty-fifth year after the foundation of Syracuse . The town took its name from the river Gelas, the place where the citadel now stands, and which was first fortified, being called Lindii. The institutions which they adopted were Dorian.
10. Demosthenes, Orations, 39.3, 40.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.1717-4.1720 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.1717. Φοῖβον κεκλόμενοι· Ἀνάφην δέ τε λισσάδα νῆσον 4.1718. ἴσκον, ὃ δὴ Φοῖβός μιν ἀτυζομένοις ἀνέφηνεν. 4.1719. ῥέζον δʼ ὅσσα περ ἄνδρες ἐρημαίῃ ἐνὶ ῥέζειν 4.1720. ἀκτῇ ἐφοπλίσσειαν· ὃ δή σφεας ὁππότε δαλοῖς
12. Cicero, On Divination, 1.35 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.35. Quae est igitur ista calliditas res vetustate robustas calumniando velle pervertere? Non reperio causam. Latet fortasse obscuritate involuta naturae; non enim me deus ista scire, sed his tantum modo uti voluit. Utar igitur nec adducar aut in extis totam Etruriam delirare aut eandem gentem in fulgoribus errare aut fallaciter portenta interpretari, cum terrae saepe fremitus, saepe mugitus, saepe motus multa nostrae rei publicae, multa ceteris civitatibus gravia et vera praedixerint. 1.35. What sort of cleverness is it, then, that would attempt by sophistry to overthrow facts that antiquity has established? I fail — you tell me — to discover their cause. That, perhaps, is one of Natures hidden secrets. God has not willed me to know the cause, but only that I should use the means which he has given. Therefore, I will use them and I will not allow myself to be persuaded that the whole Etruscan nation has gone stark mad on the subject of entrails, or that these same people are in error about lightnings, or that they are false interpreters of portents; for many a time the rumblings and roarings and quakings of the earth have given to our republic and to other states certain forewarnings of subsequent disaster.
13. Tacitus, Annals, 2.47 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.47.  In the same year, twelve important cities of Asia collapsed in an earthquake, the time being night, so that the havoc was the less foreseen and the more devastating. Even the usual resource in these catastrophes, a rush to open ground, was unavailing, as the fugitives were swallowed up in yawning chasms. Accounts are given of huge mountains sinking, of former plains seen heaved aloft, of fires flashing out amid the ruin. As the disaster fell heaviest on the Sardians, it brought them the largest measure of sympathy, the Caesar promising ten million sesterces, and remitting for five years their payments to the national and imperial exchequers. The Magnesians of Sipylus were ranked second in the extent of their losses and their indemnity. In the case of the Temnians, Philadelphenes, Aegeates, Apollonideans, the so‑called Mostenians and Hyrcanian Macedonians, and the cities of Hierocaesarea, Myrina, Cyme, and Tmolus, it was decided to exempt them from tribute for the same term and to send a senatorial commissioner to view the state of affairs and administer relief. Since Asia was held by a consular governor, an ex-praetor — Marcus Ateius — was selected, so as to avoid the difficulties which might arise from the jealousy of two officials of similar standing.
14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.1.6, 2.4.6, 2.5.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.1.6. A legend of the Corinthians about their land is not peculiar to them, for I believe that the Athenians were the first to relate a similar story to glorify Attica . The Corinthians say that Poseidon had a dispute with Helius (Sun) about the land, and that Briareos arbitrated between them, assigning to Poseidon the Isthmus and the parts adjoining, and giving to Helius the height above the city. Ever since, they say, the Isthmus has belonged to Poseidon. 2.4.6. The Acrocorinthus is a mountain peak above the city, assigned to Helius by Briareos when he acted as adjudicator, and handed over, the Corinthians say, by Helius to Aphrodite. As you go up this Acrocorinthus you see two precincts of Isis, one if Isis surnamed Pelagian (Marine) and the other of Egyptian Isis, and two of Serapis, one of them being of Serapis called “in Canopus .” After these are altars to Helius, and a sanctuary of Necessity and Force, into which it is not customary to enter. 2.5.1. On the summit of the Acrocorinthus is a temple of Aphrodite. The images are Aphrodite armed, Helius, and Eros with a bow. The spring, which is behind the temple, they say was the gift of Asopus to Sisyphus. The latter knew, so runs the legend, that Zeus had ravished Aegina, the daughter of Asopus, but refused to give information to the seeker before he had a spring given him on the Acrocorinthus. When Asopus granted this request Sisyphus turned informer, and on this account he receives—if anyone believes the story—punishment in Hades. I have heard people say that this spring and Peirene are the same, the water in the city flowing hence under-ground.
15. Callimachus, Hymns, 4.36-4.38



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, formal (formulaic) shape of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
agamemnon, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
akhaia, akhaians (epic, also atreids), superseded on rhodes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
alexandria (egypt) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
alētheia/alatheia, in aeschylus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
alētheia/alatheia Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 17
alēthēs, in pindar Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 18
alēthēs Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 17
amphiaraus the seer Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 352
anaphe Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), oracles at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), story type of archaic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
apollo (god) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
apollo pythios (delphi), and colonization Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
argonauts Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
argos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
artemis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
athena, birth of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
athenian empire, and thriving local polis-world Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
athenian empire, as system of economic dependencies Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
athenian empire, breaking up ties between allies Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
athenocentrism, sometimes misleading, autochthony vs. immigration Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
automate Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
calypso Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
caria Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
carthage, carthaginians, and romans Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
cassandra Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
cercei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
charis Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 18
chorus of choephori Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
chorus of seven, awareness of reciprocity Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
chorus of suppliants Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
circe Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
circei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
cleomenes, king of sparta Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
coinage, argive in dodekanese and s. asia minor Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225, 241
coinage, of rhodes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225, 241
cyrus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
defending greeks and democracies, outside athens Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
delos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
diomedes Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
dolon, oath with hector Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
duplicitous oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
earth, touching during oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
earth Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
earth (gaia/ge), oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
earthquakes Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
economy, early fifth-century, of island worlds Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
elites, and the polis Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
elites, caught between aristocracy and democracy Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
elites, maritime and commercial Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
elites, ἔμβολον Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
ephesus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
epinician Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 17, 18, 30
epinikion, elite competition and interaction in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
epinikion, performed in ritual context Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
epinikion, public dimension of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225, 257
epinikion, reception of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
etruscans Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
founding Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
friendship, dissolved by oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
gadatas Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
glaucus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
great oath of the gods (megas, horkos) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
great oath of the gods (megas horkos) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
hagesias of syracuse Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 352
halone Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
heaven, raising hands/objects to Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144, 197
heaven (uranus) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
hector, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
helios, and apollo Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 76
helios, in cult practice Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 76
helios (divinity) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
helios (sun), oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
hera, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144, 197
hiera, aegean island Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
homer, authorial voice in Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 352
homer, in pindar Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 17, 18
homer, oaths, language of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
homer Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 17
horkos, gods) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
hypnos (sleep) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
hystaspas Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
idaeus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
ilium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
insular Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225, 241, 257
islands, in the aegean, (re-)births of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
islands, in the aegean, fast and frequent change on Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
islands, in the aegean, networking Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
islands, in the aegean, polis vs. island identity Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241, 257
islands, in the aegean, synoikism/unification Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225, 257
islands, in the aegean, topoi in myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
islands, in the aegean Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225, 241, 257
junius silanus, m. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
lachesis Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144, 197, 352
latium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
lemnos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
leotychidas of sparta, leto, oaths of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
leto Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
libyan oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
lindos, hero Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
lydia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
lykia, lykians, and rhodes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
maeander river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
magnesia near sipylus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
mantias of thoricus (against, boeotus) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
mantitheus (against boeotus) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
memories, social, and perceived pre-history of greece Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
mycenae, mycenaeans (bronze age), on rhodes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
nasamones (libyan tribe) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
neae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), economic dimension of (aegean, rhodes) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
nonacris Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
norbanus balbus, l. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
nostoi traditions, in the east Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
oath-challenges Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
odysseus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 17
past, mythical, unified in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
peraia, rhodian Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
performances of myth and ritual (also song), (re)creation of worshipping groups Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
performances of myth and ritual (also song), and economic patterns Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
pharos island Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
phaselis Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
plangon (against boeotus) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
poet-patron relationship Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 18, 30
poseidon Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241; Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
praise Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 18
priamel Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
propontis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
punic wars, first, second Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
reciprocity, in aeschylus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
rhodes, bronze age settlements Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
rhodes, connectivity of in myth and cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
rhodes, hub of maritime commerce Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
rhodes, integration of elite and civic concerns Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
rhodes, maritime elites on Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
rhodes, pan-rhodian identity, forged in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
rhodes, rivalry with athens Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
rhodes, synoikism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
rhodes, unified by the sea Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241, 257
rhodes, unity vs. fragmentation Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
rhodes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225, 241, 257; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
sardis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
siltation Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
sleep (hypnos) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
synoikism, and myth-ritual network reconfigured in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
synoikism, economic dimension of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
thera Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
therasia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
tiberius (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
tlepolemos (herakleid), cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 225
tlepolemos (herakleid) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241
trasimenus, lake Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 88
triad of divine witnesses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 197
tripolis (rhodes) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
trojan war, oaths during Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
trojan war Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 144
truth, definitions of Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 17, 18
victor, of epinikian odes, polis and' Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 257
xenia Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 30
zeus, olympian Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 241