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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.17
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1. Homer, Iliad, 14.114, 22.99-22.213 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

14.114. / Near by is that man; not long shall we seek him, if so be ye are minded to give ear, and be no wise vexed and wroth, each one of you, for that in years I am the youngest among you. Nay, but of a goodly father do I too declare that I am come by lineage, even of Tydeus, whom in Thebe the heaped-up earth covereth. 22.99. /and terribly he glareth as he coileth him about within his lair; even so Hector in his courage unquenchable would not give ground, leaning his bright shield against the jutting wall. Then, mightily moved, he spake unto his own great-hearted spirit:Ah, woe is me, if I go within the gates and the walls 22.100. /Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly 22.101. /Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly 22.102. /Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly 22.103. /Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly 22.104. /Polydamas will be the first to put reproach upon me, for that he bade me lead the Trojans to the city during this fatal night, when goodly Achilles arose. Howbeit I hearkened not—verily it had been better far! But now, seeing I have brought the host to ruin in my blind folly 22.105. /I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home 22.106. /I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home 22.107. /I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home 22.108. /I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home 22.109. /I have shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives with trailing robes, lest haply some other baser man may say: ‘Hector, trusting in his own might, brought ruin on the host.’ So will they say; but for me it were better far to meet Achilles man to man and shay him, and so get me home 22.110. /or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.111. /or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.112. /or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.113. /or myself perish gloriously before the city. 22.114. /or myself perish gloriously before the city. Or what if I lay down my bossed shield and my heavy helm, and leaning my spear against the wall, go myself to meet peerless Achilles, and promise him that Helen 22.115. /and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.116. /and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.117. /and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.118. /and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.119. /and with her all the store of treasure that Alexander brought in his hollow ships to Troy —the which was the beginning of strife—will we give to the sons of Atreus to take away, and furthermore and separate therefrom will make due division with the Achaeans of all that this city holdeth; and if thereafter I take from the Trojans an oath sworn by the elders 22.120. /that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed 22.121. /that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed 22.122. /that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed 22.123. /that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed 22.124. /that they will hide nothing, but will divide all in twain, even all the treasure that the lovely city holdeth within? But why doth my heart thus hold converse with me? Let it not be that I go and draw nigh him, but he then pity me not nor anywise have reverence unto me, but slay me out of hand all unarmed 22.125. /as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.126. /as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.127. /as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.128. /as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.129. /as I were a woman, when I have put from me mine armour. In no wise may I now from oak-tree or from rock hold dalliance with him, even as youth and maiden—youth and maiden! —hold dalliance one with the other. Better were it to clash in strife with all speed; 22.130. /let us know to which of us twain the Olympian will vouchsafe glory. 22.131. /let us know to which of us twain the Olympian will vouchsafe glory. 22.132. /let us know to which of us twain the Olympian will vouchsafe glory. 22.133. /let us know to which of us twain the Olympian will vouchsafe glory. 22.134. /let us know to which of us twain the Olympian will vouchsafe glory. So he pondered as he abode, and nigh to him came Achilles, the peer of Enyalius, warrior of the waving helm, brandishing over his right shoulder the Pelian ash, his terrible spear; and all round about the bronze flashed like the gleam 22.135. /of blazing fire or of the sun as he riseth. But trembling gat hold of Hector when he was ware of him, neither dared he any more abide where he was, but left the gates behind him, and fled in fear; and the son of Peleus rushed after him, trusting in his fleetness of foot. As a falcon in the mountains, swiftest of winged things 22.136. /of blazing fire or of the sun as he riseth. But trembling gat hold of Hector when he was ware of him, neither dared he any more abide where he was, but left the gates behind him, and fled in fear; and the son of Peleus rushed after him, trusting in his fleetness of foot. As a falcon in the mountains, swiftest of winged things 22.137. /of blazing fire or of the sun as he riseth. But trembling gat hold of Hector when he was ware of him, neither dared he any more abide where he was, but left the gates behind him, and fled in fear; and the son of Peleus rushed after him, trusting in his fleetness of foot. As a falcon in the mountains, swiftest of winged things 22.138. /of blazing fire or of the sun as he riseth. But trembling gat hold of Hector when he was ware of him, neither dared he any more abide where he was, but left the gates behind him, and fled in fear; and the son of Peleus rushed after him, trusting in his fleetness of foot. As a falcon in the mountains, swiftest of winged things 22.139. /of blazing fire or of the sun as he riseth. But trembling gat hold of Hector when he was ware of him, neither dared he any more abide where he was, but left the gates behind him, and fled in fear; and the son of Peleus rushed after him, trusting in his fleetness of foot. As a falcon in the mountains, swiftest of winged things 22.140. /swoopeth lightly after a trembling dove: she fleeth before him, and he hard at hand darteth ever at her with shrill cries, and his heart biddeth him seize her; even so Achilles in his fury sped straight on, and Hector fled beneath the wall of the Trojans, and plied his limbs swiftly. 22.141. /swoopeth lightly after a trembling dove: she fleeth before him, and he hard at hand darteth ever at her with shrill cries, and his heart biddeth him seize her; even so Achilles in his fury sped straight on, and Hector fled beneath the wall of the Trojans, and plied his limbs swiftly. 22.142. /swoopeth lightly after a trembling dove: she fleeth before him, and he hard at hand darteth ever at her with shrill cries, and his heart biddeth him seize her; even so Achilles in his fury sped straight on, and Hector fled beneath the wall of the Trojans, and plied his limbs swiftly. 22.143. /swoopeth lightly after a trembling dove: she fleeth before him, and he hard at hand darteth ever at her with shrill cries, and his heart biddeth him seize her; even so Achilles in his fury sped straight on, and Hector fled beneath the wall of the Trojans, and plied his limbs swiftly. 22.144. /swoopeth lightly after a trembling dove: she fleeth before him, and he hard at hand darteth ever at her with shrill cries, and his heart biddeth him seize her; even so Achilles in his fury sped straight on, and Hector fled beneath the wall of the Trojans, and plied his limbs swiftly. 22.145. /Past the place of watch, and the wind-waved wild fig-tree they sped, ever away from under the wall along the waggon-track, and came to the two fair-flowing fountains, where well up the two springs that feed eddying Scamander. The one floweth with warm water, and round about a smoke 22.146. /Past the place of watch, and the wind-waved wild fig-tree they sped, ever away from under the wall along the waggon-track, and came to the two fair-flowing fountains, where well up the two springs that feed eddying Scamander. The one floweth with warm water, and round about a smoke 22.147. /Past the place of watch, and the wind-waved wild fig-tree they sped, ever away from under the wall along the waggon-track, and came to the two fair-flowing fountains, where well up the two springs that feed eddying Scamander. The one floweth with warm water, and round about a smoke 22.148. /Past the place of watch, and the wind-waved wild fig-tree they sped, ever away from under the wall along the waggon-track, and came to the two fair-flowing fountains, where well up the two springs that feed eddying Scamander. The one floweth with warm water, and round about a smoke 22.149. /Past the place of watch, and the wind-waved wild fig-tree they sped, ever away from under the wall along the waggon-track, and came to the two fair-flowing fountains, where well up the two springs that feed eddying Scamander. The one floweth with warm water, and round about a smoke 22.150. /goeth up therefrom as it were from a blazing fire, while the other even in summer floweth forth cold as hail or chill snow or ice that water formeth. And there hard by the selfsame springs are broad washing-tanks, fair and wrought of stone 22.151. /goeth up therefrom as it were from a blazing fire, while the other even in summer floweth forth cold as hail or chill snow or ice that water formeth. And there hard by the selfsame springs are broad washing-tanks, fair and wrought of stone 22.152. /goeth up therefrom as it were from a blazing fire, while the other even in summer floweth forth cold as hail or chill snow or ice that water formeth. And there hard by the selfsame springs are broad washing-tanks, fair and wrought of stone 22.153. /goeth up therefrom as it were from a blazing fire, while the other even in summer floweth forth cold as hail or chill snow or ice that water formeth. And there hard by the selfsame springs are broad washing-tanks, fair and wrought of stone 22.154. /goeth up therefrom as it were from a blazing fire, while the other even in summer floweth forth cold as hail or chill snow or ice that water formeth. And there hard by the selfsame springs are broad washing-tanks, fair and wrought of stone 22.155. /where the wives and fair daughters of the Trojans were wont to wash bright raiment of old in the time of peace, before the sons of the Achaeans came. Thereby they ran, one fleeing, and one pursuing. In front a good man fled, but one mightier far pursued him swiftly; for it was not for beast of sacrifice or for bull's hide 22.156. /where the wives and fair daughters of the Trojans were wont to wash bright raiment of old in the time of peace, before the sons of the Achaeans came. Thereby they ran, one fleeing, and one pursuing. In front a good man fled, but one mightier far pursued him swiftly; for it was not for beast of sacrifice or for bull's hide 22.157. /where the wives and fair daughters of the Trojans were wont to wash bright raiment of old in the time of peace, before the sons of the Achaeans came. Thereby they ran, one fleeing, and one pursuing. In front a good man fled, but one mightier far pursued him swiftly; for it was not for beast of sacrifice or for bull's hide 22.158. /where the wives and fair daughters of the Trojans were wont to wash bright raiment of old in the time of peace, before the sons of the Achaeans came. Thereby they ran, one fleeing, and one pursuing. In front a good man fled, but one mightier far pursued him swiftly; for it was not for beast of sacrifice or for bull's hide 22.159. /where the wives and fair daughters of the Trojans were wont to wash bright raiment of old in the time of peace, before the sons of the Achaeans came. Thereby they ran, one fleeing, and one pursuing. In front a good man fled, but one mightier far pursued him swiftly; for it was not for beast of sacrifice or for bull's hide 22.160. /that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 22.161. /that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 22.162. /that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 22.163. /that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 22.164. /that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 22.165. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.166. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.167. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.168. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.169. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.170. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.171. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.172. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.173. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.174. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.175. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.176. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.177. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.178. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.179. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. Then spake unto him the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene:O Father, Lord of the bright lightning and of the dark cloud, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded 22.180. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.181. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.182. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.183. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.184. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.185. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.186. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.187. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.188. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.189. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.190. /rouseth from his covert the fawn of a deer and chaseth him through glens and glades, and though he escape for a time, cowering beneath a thicket, yet doth the hound track him out and run ever on until he find him; even so Hector escaped not the swift-footed son of Peleus. oft as he strove to rush straight for the Dardanian gates 22.191. /rouseth from his covert the fawn of a deer and chaseth him through glens and glades, and though he escape for a time, cowering beneath a thicket, yet doth the hound track him out and run ever on until he find him; even so Hector escaped not the swift-footed son of Peleus. oft as he strove to rush straight for the Dardanian gates 22.192. /rouseth from his covert the fawn of a deer and chaseth him through glens and glades, and though he escape for a time, cowering beneath a thicket, yet doth the hound track him out and run ever on until he find him; even so Hector escaped not the swift-footed son of Peleus. oft as he strove to rush straight for the Dardanian gates 22.193. /rouseth from his covert the fawn of a deer and chaseth him through glens and glades, and though he escape for a time, cowering beneath a thicket, yet doth the hound track him out and run ever on until he find him; even so Hector escaped not the swift-footed son of Peleus. oft as he strove to rush straight for the Dardanian gates 22.194. /rouseth from his covert the fawn of a deer and chaseth him through glens and glades, and though he escape for a time, cowering beneath a thicket, yet doth the hound track him out and run ever on until he find him; even so Hector escaped not the swift-footed son of Peleus. oft as he strove to rush straight for the Dardanian gates 22.195. /to gain the shelter of the well-built walls, if so be his fellows from above might succour him with missiles, so oft would Achilles be beforehand with him and turn him back toward the plain, but himself sped on by the city's walls. And as in a dream a man availeth not to pursue one that fleeth before him— 22.196. /to gain the shelter of the well-built walls, if so be his fellows from above might succour him with missiles, so oft would Achilles be beforehand with him and turn him back toward the plain, but himself sped on by the city's walls. And as in a dream a man availeth not to pursue one that fleeth before him— 22.197. /to gain the shelter of the well-built walls, if so be his fellows from above might succour him with missiles, so oft would Achilles be beforehand with him and turn him back toward the plain, but himself sped on by the city's walls. And as in a dream a man availeth not to pursue one that fleeth before him— 22.198. /to gain the shelter of the well-built walls, if so be his fellows from above might succour him with missiles, so oft would Achilles be beforehand with him and turn him back toward the plain, but himself sped on by the city's walls. And as in a dream a man availeth not to pursue one that fleeth before him— 22.199. /to gain the shelter of the well-built walls, if so be his fellows from above might succour him with missiles, so oft would Achilles be beforehand with him and turn him back toward the plain, but himself sped on by the city's walls. And as in a dream a man availeth not to pursue one that fleeth before him— 22.200. /the one availeth not to flee, nor the other to pursue—even so Achilles availed not to overtake Hector in his fleetness, neither Hector to escape. And how had Hector escaped the fates of death, but that Apollo, albeit for the last and latest time, drew nigh him to rouse his strength and make swift his knees? 22.201. /the one availeth not to flee, nor the other to pursue—even so Achilles availed not to overtake Hector in his fleetness, neither Hector to escape. And how had Hector escaped the fates of death, but that Apollo, albeit for the last and latest time, drew nigh him to rouse his strength and make swift his knees? 22.202. /the one availeth not to flee, nor the other to pursue—even so Achilles availed not to overtake Hector in his fleetness, neither Hector to escape. And how had Hector escaped the fates of death, but that Apollo, albeit for the last and latest time, drew nigh him to rouse his strength and make swift his knees? 22.203. /the one availeth not to flee, nor the other to pursue—even so Achilles availed not to overtake Hector in his fleetness, neither Hector to escape. And how had Hector escaped the fates of death, but that Apollo, albeit for the last and latest time, drew nigh him to rouse his strength and make swift his knees? 22.204. /the one availeth not to flee, nor the other to pursue—even so Achilles availed not to overtake Hector in his fleetness, neither Hector to escape. And how had Hector escaped the fates of death, but that Apollo, albeit for the last and latest time, drew nigh him to rouse his strength and make swift his knees? 22.205. /And to his folk goodly Achilles made sign with a nod of his head, and would not suffer them to hurl at Hector their bitter darts, lest another might smite him and win glory, and himself come too late. But when for the fourth time they were come to the springs, lo then the Father lifted on high his golden scales 22.206. /And to his folk goodly Achilles made sign with a nod of his head, and would not suffer them to hurl at Hector their bitter darts, lest another might smite him and win glory, and himself come too late. But when for the fourth time they were come to the springs, lo then the Father lifted on high his golden scales 22.207. /And to his folk goodly Achilles made sign with a nod of his head, and would not suffer them to hurl at Hector their bitter darts, lest another might smite him and win glory, and himself come too late. But when for the fourth time they were come to the springs, lo then the Father lifted on high his golden scales 22.208. /And to his folk goodly Achilles made sign with a nod of his head, and would not suffer them to hurl at Hector their bitter darts, lest another might smite him and win glory, and himself come too late. But when for the fourth time they were come to the springs, lo then the Father lifted on high his golden scales 22.209. /And to his folk goodly Achilles made sign with a nod of his head, and would not suffer them to hurl at Hector their bitter darts, lest another might smite him and win glory, and himself come too late. But when for the fourth time they were come to the springs, lo then the Father lifted on high his golden scales 22.210. /and set therein two fates of grievous death, one for Achilles, and one for horse-taming Hector; then he grasped the balance by the midst and raised it; and down sank the day of doom of Hector, and departed unto Hades; and Phoebus Apollo left him. But unto Peleus' son came the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene 22.211. /and set therein two fates of grievous death, one for Achilles, and one for horse-taming Hector; then he grasped the balance by the midst and raised it; and down sank the day of doom of Hector, and departed unto Hades; and Phoebus Apollo left him. But unto Peleus' son came the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene 22.212. /and set therein two fates of grievous death, one for Achilles, and one for horse-taming Hector; then he grasped the balance by the midst and raised it; and down sank the day of doom of Hector, and departed unto Hades; and Phoebus Apollo left him. But unto Peleus' son came the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene 22.213. /and set therein two fates of grievous death, one for Achilles, and one for horse-taming Hector; then he grasped the balance by the midst and raised it; and down sank the day of doom of Hector, and departed unto Hades; and Phoebus Apollo left him. But unto Peleus' son came the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene
2. Homer, Odyssey, 17.383-17.385 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 569, 580-590, 382 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

382. θείνει δʼ ὀνείδει μάντιν Οἰκλείδην σοφόν
4. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 9.9-9.17, 9.23-9.25 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.92-2.95, 6.11-6.16, 6.18, 10.16-10.17 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Pindar, Paeanes, 2.67, 6.19-6.27, 6.44-6.45 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 8.38-8.60 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 160, 159 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

159. He is standing by Adrastus
9. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 287-364, 399-462, 857-917, 955-989, 286 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

286. Mother mine, why weepest thou, drawing o’er thine eyes thy veil? Is it because thou didst hear their piteous lamentations? To my own heart it goes. Raise thy silvered head, weep not
10. Herodotus, Histories, 9.33-9.36 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9.33. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city. ,This they did, for when Tisamenus was inquiring of the oracle at Delphi concerning offspring, the priestess prophesied to him that he should win five great victories. Not understanding that oracle, he engaged in bodily exercise, thinking that he would then be able to win in similar sports. When he had trained himself for the Five Contests, he came within one wrestling bout of winning the Olympic prize, in a match with Hieronymus of Andros. ,The Lacedaemonians, however, perceived that the oracle given to Tisamenus spoke of the lists not of sport but of war, and they attempted to bribe Tisamenus to be a leader in their wars jointly with their kings of Heracles' line. ,When he saw that the Spartans set great store by his friendship, he set his price higher, and made it known to them that he would do what they wanted only in exchange for the gift of full citizenship and all of the citizen's rights. ,Hearing that, the Spartans at first were angry and completely abandoned their request; but when the dreadful menace of this Persian host hung over them, they consented and granted his demand. When he saw their purpose changed, he said that he would not be content with that alone; his brother Hegias too must be made a Spartan on the same terms as himself. 9.34. By so saying he imitated Melampus, in so far as one may compare demands for kingship with those for citizenship. For when the women of Argos had gone mad, and the Argives wanted him to come from Pylos and heal them of that madness, Melampus demanded half of their kingship for his wages. ,This the Argives would not put up with and departed. When, however, the madness spread among their women, they promised what Melampus demanded and were ready to give it to him. Thereupon, seeing their purpose changed, he demanded yet more and said that he would not do their will except if they gave a third of their kingship to his brother Bias; now driven into dire straits, the Argives consented to that also. 9.35. The Spartans too were so eagerly desirous of winning Tisamenus that they granted everything that he demanded. When they had granted him this also, Tisamenus of Elis, now a Spartan, engaged in divination for them and aided them to win five very great victories. No one on earth save Tisamenus and his brother ever became citizens of Sparta. ,Now the five victories were these: one, the first, this victory at Plataea; next, that which was won at Tegea over the Tegeans and Argives; after that, over all the Arcadians save the Mantineans at Dipaea; next, over the Messenians at Ithome; lastly, the victory at Tanagra over the Athenians and Argives, which was the last won of the five victories. 9.36. This Tisamenus had now been brought by the Spartans and was the diviner of the Greeks at Plataea. The sacrifices boded good to the Greeks if they would just defend themselves, but evil if they should cross the Asopus and be the first to attack.
11. Isocrates, Orations, 4.54-4.59 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Lysias, Orations, 2.7-2.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Plato, Menexenus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

239b. deeming it their duty to fight in the cause of freedom alike with Greeks on behalf of Greeks and with barbarians on behalf of the whole of Greece . The story of how they repulsed Eumolpus and the Amazons, and still earlier invaders, when they marched upon our country, and how they defended the Argives against the Cadmeians and the Heracleidae against the Argives, is a story which our time is too short to relate as it deserves, and already their valor has been adequately celebrated in song by poets who have made it known throughout the world;
14. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 4.92-4.99, 8.1.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens, for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily .
15. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.18-2.4.19, 6.5.46-6.5.48 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.18. After saying these words and turning about to face the enemy, he kept quiet; for the seer bade them not to attack until one of their own number was either killed or wounded. But as soon as that happens, he said, we shall lead on, and to you who follow will come victory, but death, methinks, to me. 2.4.19. And his saying did not prove false, for when they had taken up their shields, he, as though led on by a kind of fate, leaped forth first of all, fell upon the enemy, and was slain, and he lies buried at the ford of the Cephisus; but the others were victorious, and pursued the enemy as far as the level ground. In this battle fell two of the Thirty, Critias and Hippomachus, one of the Ten who ruled in Piraeus, Charmides, the son of Glaucon, and about seventy of the others. And the victors took possession of their arms, but they did not strip off the tunic Worn underneath the breastplate. The victors, then, appropriated the arms and armour of the dead, but not their clothing. of any citizen. When this had been done and while they were giving back the bodies of the dead, many on either side mingled and talked with one another. 6.5.46. I see also the Thebans, who then See 35 above, and cp. note on iii. 13. did not succeed in persuading the Lacedaemonians to enslave you, now requesting you to allow those who saved you to perish. It is truly a noble deed that is told of your ancestors, when they did not suffer those Argives who died at the Cadmea to go unburied; After the defeat of the legendary expedition of the Seven against Thebes it was only the intervention of the Athenians which compelled the Thebans to permit the burial of the enemy’s dead. but you would achieve a far nobler deed if you did not suffer those Lacedaemonians who still live either to incur insult or to perish. 6.5.47. And while that other deed was also noble, when you checked the insolence of Eurystheus and preserved the sons of Heracles, The sons of Heracles, driven from Peloponnesus by Eurystheus, found protection and aid at Athens. would it not surely be an even nobler one if you saved from perishing, not merely the founders, but the whole state as well? And noblest of all deeds if, after the Lacedaemonians saved you then by a 370 B.C. vote, void of danger, you shall aid them now with arms and at the risk of your lives. 6.5.48. Again, when even we, who by word urge you to aid brave men, are proud of doing so, it would manifestly be generous of you, who are able to aid by act, if, after being many times both friends and enemies of the Lacedaemonians, you should recall, not the harm you have suffered at their hands, but rather the favours which you have, received, and should render them requital, not in behalf of yourselves alone, but also in behalf of all Greece, because in her behalf they proved themselves brave men.
16. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.129-19.130, 19.281, 60.8 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.65-1.66, 1.80, 1.1083, 2.923, 3.543, 3.916-3.917, 4.1502-4.1503 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.65. ἤλυθε δʼ αὖ Μόψος Τιταρήσιος, ὃν περὶ πάντων 1.66. Λητοΐδης ἐδίδαξε θεοπροπίας οἰωνῶν· 1.80. αὐτὸν ὁμῶς Μόψον τε δαήμονα μαντοσυνάων 1.1083. Μόψος τʼ Ἀμπυκίδης ἀδινὰ κνώσσοντας ἔρυντο. 2.923. Ἀμπυκίδης Μόψος λοιβῇσί τε μειλίξασθαι. 3.543. κίρκος δʼ ἀφλάστῳ περικάππεσεν. ὦκα δὲ Μόψος 3.916. ἦγε διὲκ πεδίου· ἅμα δέ σφισιν εἵπετο Μόψος 3.917. Ἀμπυκίδης, ἐσθλὸς μὲν ἐπιπροφανέντας ἐνισπεῖν 4.1502. ἔνθα καὶ Ἀμπυκίδην αὐτῷ ἐνὶ ἤματι Μόψον 4.1503. νηλειὴς ἕλε πότμος· ἀδευκέα δʼ οὐ φύγεν αἶσαν
18. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 128 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

19. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 12.524 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.22, 9.2.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.22. On doubling the cape of Sounion one comes to Sounion, a noteworthy deme; then to Thoricus; then to a deme called Potamus, whose inhabitants are called Potamii; then to Prasia, to Steiria, to Brauron, where is the sanctuary of the Artemis Brauronia, to Halae Araphenides, where is the sanctuary of Artemis Tauropolos, to Myrrinus, to Probalinthus, and to Marathon, where Miltiades utterly destroyed the forces under Datis the Persian, without waiting for the Lacedemonians, who came too late because they wanted the full moon. Here, too, is the scene of the myth of the Marathonian bull, which was slain by Theseus. After Marathon one comes to Tricorynthus; then to Rhamnus, the sanctuary of Nemesis; then to Psaphis, the land of the Oropians. In the neighborhood of Psaphis is the Amphiaraeium, an oracle once held in honor, where in his flight Amphiaraus, as Sophocles says, with four-horse chariot, armour and all, was received by a cleft that was made in the Theban dust. Oropus has often been disputed territory; for it is situated on the common boundary of Attica and Boeotia. off this coast are islands: off Thoricus and Sounion lies the island Helene; it is rugged and deserted, and in its length of about sixty stadia extends parallel to the coast. This island, they say, is mentioned by the poet where Alexander says to Helen: Not even when first I snatched thee from lovely Lacedemon and sailed with thee on the seafaring ships, and in the island Cranae joined with thee in love and couch; for he calls Cranae the island now called Helene from the fact that the intercourse took place there. And after Helene comes Euboea, which lies off the next stretch of coast; it likewise is narrow and long and in length lies parallel to the mainland, like Helene. The voyage from Sounion to the southerly promontory of Euboea, which is called Leuce Acte, is three hundred stadia. However, I shall discuss Euboea later; but as for the demes in the interior of Attica, it would be tedious to recount them because of their great number. 9.2.11. Also Mycalessus, a village, is in the Tanagraean territory. It is situated on the road that leads from Thebes to Chalcis; and in the Boeotian dialect it is called Mycalettus. And Harma is likewise in the Tanagraean territory; it is a deserted village near Mycalettus, and received its name from the chariot of Amphiaraus, and is a different place from the Harma in Attica, which is near Phyle, a deme of Attica bordering on Tanagra. Here originated the proverb, when the lightning flashes through Harma; for those who are called the Pythaistae look in the general direction of Harma, in accordance with an oracle, and note any flash of lightning in that direction, and then, when they see the lightning flash, take the offering to Delphi. They would keep watch for three months, for three days and nights each month, from the altar of Zeus Astrapaeus; this altar is within the walls between the Pythium and the Olympium. In regard to the Harma in Boeotia, some say that Amphiaraus fell in the battle out of his chariot near the place where his sanctuary now is, and that the chariot was drawn empty to the place which bears the same name; others say that the chariot of Adrastus, when he was in flight, was smashed to pieces there, but that Adrastus safely escaped on Areion. But Philochorus says that Adrastus was saved by the inhabitants of the village, and that on this account they obtained equal rights of citizenship from the Argives.
21. Plutarch, Theseus, 29.4-29.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.2, 1.34.4, 2.32.2, 3.11.6-3.11.10, 3.12.5, 9.18.2, 9.19.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.2. Legend says that when Amphiaraus was exiled from Thebes the earth opened and swallowed both him and his chariot. Only they say that the incident did not happen here, the place called the Chariot being on the road from Thebes to Chalcis . The divinity of Amphiaraus was first established among the Oropians, from whom afterwards all the Greeks received the cult. I can enumerate other men also born at this time who are worshipped among the Greeks as gods; some even have cities dedicated to them, such as Eleus in Chersonnesus dedicated to Protesilaus, and Lebadea of the Boeotians dedicated to Trophonius. The Oropians have both a temple and a white marble statue of Amphiaraus. 1.34.4. The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims. 2.32.2. Within this enclosure is a temple of Apollo Seafaring, an offering of Diomedes for having weathered the storm that came upon the Greeks as they were returning from Troy . They say that Diomedes was also the first to hold the Pythian games in honor of Apollo. of Damia and Auxesia (for the Troezenians, too, share in their worship) they do not give the same account as the Epidaurians and Aeginetans, but say that they were maidens who came from Crete . A general insurrection having arisen in the city, these too, they say, were stoned to death by the opposite party; and they hold a festival in their honor that they call Stoning. 3.11.6. Tisamenus belonged to the family of the Iamidae at Elis, and an oracle was given to him that he should win five most famous contests. So he trained for the pentathlon at Olympia, but came away defeated. And yet he was first in two events, beating Hieronymus of Andros in running and in jumping. But when he lost the wrestling bout to this competitor, and so missed the prize, he understood what the oracle meant, that the god granted him to win five contests in war by his divinations. 3.11.7. The Lacedaemonians, hearing of the oracle the Pythian priestess had given to Tisamenus, persuaded him to migrate from Elis and to be state-diviner at Sparta . And Tisamenus won them five contests in war. 479 B.C. The first was at Plataea against the Persians; the second was at Tegea, when the Lacedaemonians had engaged the Tegeans and Argives; the third was at Dipaea, an Arcadian town in Maenalia, when all the Arcadians except the Mantineans were arrayed against them. 3.11.8. His fourth contest was against the Helots who had rebelled and left the Isthmus for Ithome . 464 B.C. Not all the Helots revolted, only the Messenian element, which separated itself off from the old Helots. These events I shall relate presently. On the occasion I mention the Lacedaemonians allowed the rebels to depart under a truce, in accordance with the advice of Tisamenus and of the oracle at Delphi . The last time Tisamenus divined for them was at Tanagra, an engagement taking place with the Argives and Athenians. 457 B.C. 3.11.9. Such I learned was the history of Tisamenus. On their market-place the Spartans have images of Apollo Pythaeus, of Artemis and of Leto. The whole of this region is called Choros (Dancing), because at the Gymnopaediae, a festival which the Lacedaemonians take more seriously than any other, the lads perform dances in honor of Apollo. Not far from them is a sanctuary of Earth and of Zeus of the Market-place, another of Athena of the Market-place and of Poseidon surnamed Securer, and likewise one of Apollo and of Hera. 3.11.10. There is also dedicated a colossal statue of the Spartan People. The Lacedaemonians have also a sanctuary of the Fates, by which is the grave of Orestes, son of Agamemnon. For when the bones of Orestes were brought from Tegea in accordance with an oracle they were buried here. Beside the grave of Orestes is a statue of Polydorus, son of Alcamenes, a king who rose to such honor that the magistrates seal with his likeness everything that requires sealing. 3.12.5. Farther along the Aphetaid Road are hero-shrines, of Iops, who is supposed to have been born in the time of Lelex or. Myles, and of Amphiaraus the son of Oicles. The last they think was made by the sons of Tyndareus, for that Amphiaraus was their cousin. There is a hero-shrine of Lelex himself. Not far from these is a precinct of Poseidon of Taenarum, which is the surname given him, and near by an image of Athena, which is said to have been dedicated by the colonist 9.18.2. Quite close to it are three unwrought stones. The Theban antiquaries assert that the man lying here is Tydeus, and that his burial was carried out by Maeon. As proof of their assertion they quoted a line of the Iliad : of Tydeus, who at Thebes is covered by a heap of earth. Hom. Il. 14.114 9.19.4. Adjoining are the ruins of the cities Harma (Chariot) and Mycalessus. The former got its name, according to the people of Tanagra, because the chariot of Amphiaraus disappeared here, and not where the Thebans say it did. Both peoples agree that Mycalessus was so named because the cow lowed (emykesato) here that was guiding Cadmus and his host to Thebes . How Mycalessus was laid waste I have related in that part of my history that deals with the Athenians. See Paus. 1.23.3 .
23. Bacchylides, Odes, 5.13-5.14

24. Epigraphy, Seg, 16.193



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172; Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
adrastos, aigialeus and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 174
adrastos, amphiaraos and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86, 116, 117, 118
adrastos, seven against thebes Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172, 197, 198, 199
adrastus, flight to athens Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 183
adrastus, help to polynices Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 183
adrastus, recovery of the seven (bellicose version) Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 53
adrastus, recovery of the seven (peaceful version) Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 53
adrastus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
aeschines Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
aethra Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
aigialeus Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 174
aitna, hieron as oikist of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
alkmaion, amphiaraos and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
alkmaion, as leader of epigonoi Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173
alkmaion, epiphany of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 174
alkmaion, seercraft and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
ambiguity, between divine and human identity Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 199
amphiaraos, adrastos and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86, 116, 117, 118
amphiaraos, alkmaion and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
amphiaraos, and knopia Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos, as military seer Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 117, 173, 174
amphiaraos, as oracle Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 197
amphiaraos, as seer Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172
amphiaraos, cults spread to lesser sites Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos, cults theban origin Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos, departure Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 199
amphiaraos, myth Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos, myth of disappearance Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos, myth of reemergence at sacred spring Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos, promotion from hero to god Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137; Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172, 197, 198, 199; Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraos cult Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
amphiaraus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203; Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117; Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
amphiaraus the seer Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 355
ampyx Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
and, seer as threat to Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86
antilochus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
argonauts Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
aristagoras of tenedos Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 355
asklepios, cults origin at trikka Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
athletic contests, at sikyon Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 197
bacchylides Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
balaam Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
cassandra Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
chiron Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
chorus of seven, interpretation of shields Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
chromios of aitna Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 197
chromius Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
chthonic oracles Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 174
colonial discourse, absence of seers from Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86, 116
colonial discourse, centrality of delphi-oikist relationship in Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86
colonial narrative, role of delphi in Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
comparisons, with heroes and gods Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
demosthenes Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
discourse of, oikist and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86
disorientation Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 197, 198, 199
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
divination, and patronage Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
divination, and war Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
divination, inherited divinatory ability Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
dramatic festivals, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
epidauros asklepieion, overshadowing of trikka asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
epigonoi Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
epinician poetry Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 53
epinikion, ideology of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173
epiphany, of alkmaion Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 174
eteocles, interpretation of shields Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
euripides suppliant women, dating Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
euripides suppliant women, interpretation Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
fate, in the iliad Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172
fathers and sons Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
funeral, corpse Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 198
funeral, pyre Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 198
generational repetition, and epinikian ideology Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173
hagesias, amphiaraos as a model for Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116, 117, 118
hagesias, as despotas Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 118
hagesias, as mantis Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116, 117, 118
hagesias, hieron and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116, 117, 118
hagesias, talismanic power of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
hagesias Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
hagesias of syracuse Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 355
hagesidamus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
harma, and cult of amphiaraos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
healing Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 199
hector Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
hektor Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172, 197
helenos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
heracles Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
hieron of syracuse, hagesias and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116, 117, 118
hieron of syracuse Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 197; Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
horkos (oath) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 355
hymn Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
iamidai, melampodidai and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 118
iamos, genealogy of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 118
iamos, melampous and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 118
ilas, trainer of hagesidamus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
immortality, and mortality Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 197
immortality, in epinician narrative Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
immortality, of fame Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 198
immortality, poetic Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172
impiety Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 194
jason Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
kleonai, cult of amphiaraos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
komos Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 199
lapiths Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
light Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172
mania, in warfare Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
mantic authority, colonial ideology and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116, 117, 118
mantic authority, of hagesias Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116, 117, 118
mantic inheritance Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
mantis, battle participation of manteis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
melampodidai Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 118, 174
melampous, iamos and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 118
melampous Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
melampus, melampids Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
melissus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
memory Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 198, 199
military seers, amphiaraos as Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86, 117, 174
military seers, hagesias and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 117, 118
military seers, paired with military commanders Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86
mopsos Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 118
mopsus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
multiple versions Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 53
myth, athenians knowledge of Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 53
mythological figures (excluding olympian gods and their offspring), baton Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
mythological figures (excluding olympian gods and their offspring), tyndaros Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
nai ma oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 355
narrative Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
oikists, religious authority of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
olympia, oracle and sanctuary of zeus at Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
oropos amphiareion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
orpheus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
osborne, m. j. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
papademetriou, j. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
patroclus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
philoctetes Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
pindar Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
polyneices Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
register, hymnic Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
religious authority, of oikist Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
rhamnous amphiareion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
scout in seven Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
seercraft (mantikē, mantosunē), inheritance of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
seercraft (mantikē, mantosunē), of alkmaion Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 173, 174
seers, absence from colonial discourse of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86, 116
seers, as sunoikistēr Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
seers, as threat to political authority Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86
seers, as warriors' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
seers Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
seven against thebes, burial in thebes Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 53, 183
shields in seven against thebes, of amphiaraus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
sicilian expedition Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
snake imagery Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 174
song, epic Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172
sparta, and amphiaraos cult Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
stasis, explusion of adrastos due to Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86, 117
stasis, seer as instigator of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 86
sthorys Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
sunoikistēr, hagesias as Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
syracuse, hagesias as sunoikistēr of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
talaos Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 198
talismanic power, hagesias and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 116
tellias, telliadae Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
thebes (greece), and early cult of amphiaraos Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
thebes (greece), knopia as site of amphiareion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
theological modeling Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 197
thermopylae Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 137
thrasybulus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
tisamenus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
toil Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 198
trikka asklepieion, original asklepios sanctuary Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
trikka asklepieion, overshadowed by epidauros asklepieion Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 672
troy, sack of Eisenfeld, Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes (2022) 172
vision, of amphiaraus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 128
wooden walls, oracle concerning Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
xenophon Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 203
zeus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77
χαῖρε Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 77