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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9362
Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6
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1. Homer, Odyssey, 1.415-1.416, 8.59-8.65, 8.71-8.82, 15.160-15.178, 15.223-15.257, 17.384-17.386 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 471-472, 532-540, 556, 470 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

470. The deathless gods, and you are good and strong.
3. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 18 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. ἵζει τέταρτον τοῖσδε μάντιν ἐν θρόνοις·
4. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 10.24 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Herodotus, Histories, 5.44.2, 8.27.3, 9.33-9.35, 9.33.1, 9.37, 9.92-9.94 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.44.2. This is the story which the Sybarites tell of Dorieus and his companions, but the Crotoniats say that they were aided by no stranger in their war with Sybaris with the exception of Callias, an Elean diviner of the Iamid clan. About him there was a story that he had fled to Croton from Telys, the tyrant of Sybaris, because as he was sacrificing for victory over Croton, he could obtain no favorable omens. 8.27.3. When the Phocians were besieged on Parnassus, they had with them the diviner Tellias of Elis; Tellias devised a stratagem for them: he covered six hundred of the bravest Phocians with gypsum, themselves and their armor, and led them to attack the Thessalians by night, bidding them slay whomever they should see not whitened. 9.33. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city. ,This they did, for when Tisamenus was inquiring of the oracle at Delphi concerning offspring, the priestess prophesied to him that he should win five great victories. Not understanding that oracle, he engaged in bodily exercise, thinking that he would then be able to win in similar sports. When he had trained himself for the Five Contests, he came within one wrestling bout of winning the Olympic prize, in a match with Hieronymus of Andros. ,The Lacedaemonians, however, perceived that the oracle given to Tisamenus spoke of the lists not of sport but of war, and they attempted to bribe Tisamenus to be a leader in their wars jointly with their kings of Heracles' line. ,When he saw that the Spartans set great store by his friendship, he set his price higher, and made it known to them that he would do what they wanted only in exchange for the gift of full citizenship and all of the citizen's rights. ,Hearing that, the Spartans at first were angry and completely abandoned their request; but when the dreadful menace of this Persian host hung over them, they consented and granted his demand. When he saw their purpose changed, he said that he would not be content with that alone; his brother Hegias too must be made a Spartan on the same terms as himself. 9.33.1. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city. 9.34. By so saying he imitated Melampus, in so far as one may compare demands for kingship with those for citizenship. For when the women of Argos had gone mad, and the Argives wanted him to come from Pylos and heal them of that madness, Melampus demanded half of their kingship for his wages. ,This the Argives would not put up with and departed. When, however, the madness spread among their women, they promised what Melampus demanded and were ready to give it to him. Thereupon, seeing their purpose changed, he demanded yet more and said that he would not do their will except if they gave a third of their kingship to his brother Bias; now driven into dire straits, the Argives consented to that also. 9.35. The Spartans too were so eagerly desirous of winning Tisamenus that they granted everything that he demanded. When they had granted him this also, Tisamenus of Elis, now a Spartan, engaged in divination for them and aided them to win five very great victories. No one on earth save Tisamenus and his brother ever became citizens of Sparta. ,Now the five victories were these: one, the first, this victory at Plataea; next, that which was won at Tegea over the Tegeans and Argives; after that, over all the Arcadians save the Mantineans at Dipaea; next, over the Messenians at Ithome; lastly, the victory at Tanagra over the Athenians and Argives, which was the last won of the five victories. 9.37. Mardonius' sacrifices also foretold an unfavorable outcome if he should be zealous to attack first, and good if he should but defend himself. He too used the Greek manner of sacrifice, and Hegesistratus of Elis was his diviner, the most notable of the sons of Tellias. This man had been put in prison and condemned to die by the Spartans for the great harm which he had done them. ,Being in such bad shape inasmuch as he was in peril of his life and was likely to be very grievously maltreated before his death, he did something which was almost beyond belief; made fast in iron-bound stocks, he got an iron weapon which was brought in some way into his prison, and straightway conceived a plan of such courage as we have never known; reckoning how best the rest of it might get free, he cut off his own foot at the instep. ,This done, he tunneled through the wall out of the way of the guards who kept watch over him, and so escaped to Tegea. All night he journeyed, and all day he hid and lay hidden in the woods, till on the third night he came to Tegea, while all the people of Lacedaemon sought him. The latter were greatly amazed when they saw the half of his foot which had been cut off and lying there but not were unable to find the man himself. ,This, then, is the way in which he escaped the Lacedaemonians and took refuge in Tegea, which at that time was unfriendly to Lacedaemon. After he was healed and had made himself a foot of wood, he declared himself an open enemy of the Lacedaemonians. Yet the enmity which he bore them brought him no good at the last, for they caught him at his divinations in Zacynthus and killed him. 9.92. He said this and added deed to word. For straightway the Samians bound themselves by pledge and oath to alliance with the Greeks. ,This done, the rest sailed away, but Leutychides bade Hegesistratus to sail with the Greeks because of the good omen of his name. The Greeks waited through that day, and on the next they sought and received favorable augury; their diviner was Deiphonus son of Evenius, a man of that Apollonia which is in the Ionian gulf. This man's father Evenius had once fared as I will now relate. 9.93. There is at Apollonia a certain flock sacred to the Sun, which in the daytime is pastured beside the river Chon, which flows from the mountain called Lacmon through the lands of Apollonia and empties into the sea by the harbor of Oricum. By night, those townsmen who are most notable for wealth or lineage are chosen to watch it, each man serving for a year, for the people of Apollonia set great store by this flock, being so taught by a certain oracle. It is kept in a cave far distant from the town. ,Now at the time of which I speak, Evenius was the chosen watchman. But one night he fell asleep, and wolves, coming past his guard into the cave, killed about sixty of the flock. When Evenius was aware of it, he held his peace and told no man, intending to restore what was lost by buying others. ,This matter was not, however, hidden from the people of Apollonia, and when it came to their knowledge they brought him to judgment and condemned him to lose his eyesight for sleeping at his watch. So they blinded Evenius, but from the day of their so doing their flocks bore no offspring, nor did their land yield fruit as before. ,Furthermore, a declaration was given to them at Dodona and Delphi, when they inquired of the prophets what might be the cause of their present ill: the gods told them by their prophets that they had done unjustly in blinding Evenius, the guardian of the sacred flock, “for we ourselves” (they said) “sent those wolves, and we will not cease from avenging him until you make him such restitution for what you did as he himself chooses and approves; when that is fully done, we ourselves will give Evenius such a gift as will make many men consider him happy.” 9.94. This was the oracle given to the people of Apollonia. They kept it secret and charged certain of their townsmen to carry the business through; they acted as I will now show. Coming and sitting down by Evenius at the place where he sat, they spoke of other matters, till at last they fell to commiserating his misfortune. Guiding the conversation in this way, they asked him what compensation he would choose, if the people of Apollonia should promise to requite him for what they had done. ,He, knowing nothing of the oracle, said he would choose for a gift the lands of certain named townsmen whom he thought to have the two fairest estates in Apollonia, and a house besides which he knew to be the fairest in the town; let him (he said) have possession of these, and he would lay aside his anger, and be satisfied with that by way of restitution. ,So he said this, and those who were sitting beside him said in reply: “Evenius, the people of Apollonia hereby make you that restitution for the loss of your sight, obeying the oracle given to them.” At that he was very angry, for he learned through this the whole story and saw that they had cheated him. They did, however, buy from the possessors and give him what he had chosen, and from that day he had a natural gift of divination, through which he won fame.
6. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 556 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.68 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 48.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Theocritus, Idylls, 10.22-10.23 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Cicero, On Divination, 1.91 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.91. nec quisquam rex Persarum potest esse, qui non ante magorum disciplinam scientiamque perceperit. Licet autem videre et genera quaedam et nationes huic scientiae deditas. Telmessus in Caria est, qua in urbe excellit haruspicum disciplina; itemque Elis in Peloponneso familias duas certas habet, Iamidarum unam, alteram Clutidarum, haruspicinae nobilitate praestantes. In Syria Chaldaei cognitione astrorum sollertiaque ingeniorum antecellunt. 1.91. Indeed, no one can become king of the Persians until he has learned the theory and the practice of the magi. Moreover, you may see whole families and tribes devoted to this art. For example, Telmessus in Caria is a city noted for its cultivation of the soothsayers art, and there is also Elis in Peloponnesus, which has permanently set aside two families as soothsayers, the Iamidae and the Clutidae, who are distinguished for superior skill in their art. In Syria the Chaldeans are pre-eminent for their knowledge of astronomy and for their quickness of mind.
11. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 6.14, 9.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.14. He who rises early to seek her will have no difficulty,for he will find her sitting at his gates. 9.4. give me the wisdom that sits by thy throne,and do not reject me from among thy servants.
12. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.49.1, 11.66, 11.76.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11.49.1.  Hieron removed the people of Naxos and Catana from their cities and sent there settlers of his own choosing, having gathered five thousand from the Peloponnesus and added an equal number of others from Syracuse; and the name of Catana he changed to Aetna, and not only the territory of Catana but also much neighbouring land which he added to it he portioned out in allotments, up to the full sum of ten thousand settlers. 11.66. 1.  When Lysistratus was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Lucius Pinarius Mamertinus and Publius Furius Fifron. In this year Hieron, the king of the Syracusans, summoning to Syracuse the sons of Anaxilas, the former tyrant of Zanclê, and giving them great gifts, reminded them of the benefactions Gelon had rendered their father, and advised them, now that they had come of age, to require an accounting of Micythus, their guardian, and themselves to take over the government of Zanclê.,2.  And when they had returned to Rhegium and required of their guardian an accounting of his administration, Micythus, who was an upright man, gathered together the old family friends of the children and rendered so honest an accounting that all present were filled with admiration of both his justice and good faith; and the children, regretting the steps they had taken, begged Micythus to take back the administration and to conduct the affairs of the state with a father's power and position.,3.  Micythus, however, did not accede to the request, but after turning everything over to them punctiliously and putting his own goods aboard a boat he set sail from Rhegium, accompanied by the goodwill of the populace; and reaching Greece he spent the rest of his life in Tegea in Arcadia, enjoying the approval of men.,4.  And Hieron, the king of the Syracusans, died in Catana and received the honours which are accorded to heroes, as having been the founder of the city. He had ruled eleven years, and he left the kingdom to his brother Thrasybulus, who ruled over the Syracusans for one year. 11.76.3.  While these events were taking place, Ducetius, the leader of the Siceli, harbouring a grudge against the inhabitants of Catana because they had robbed the Siceli of their land, led an army against them. And since the Syracusans had likewise sent an army against Catana, they and the Siceli joined in portioning out the land in allotments among themselves and made war upon the settlers who had been sent by Hieron when he was ruler of Syracuse. The Catanians opposed them with arms, but were defeated in a number of engagements and were expelled from Catana, and they took possession of what is now Aetna, which was formerly called Inessa; and the original inhabitants of Catana, after a long period, got back their native city.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 177 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 194 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

194. Accordingly the holy scriptures tell us that, "Shechem spake according to the mind of the virgin, having first humbled Her." It is not said then, with great purpose and accuracy, that he spake according to the mind of the damsel, for the purpose of showing distinctly that he acted in a contrary manner to that in which he spoke? For Dinah means "incorruptible judgment:" justice the attribute seated by God, the everlasting virgin; for the name Dinah, being interpreted, means either thing, "judgment" or "justice.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 4.201 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.201. Why then should those who forget themselves, and who in their arrogance fancy that they themselves are superior to the ordinary natural weakness of mankind, and that they are out of the reach of the invisible and unexpected attacks of fortune, which often aims sudden blows at all people, and which has often wrecked men, who up to that moment had enjoyed a prosperous voyage through life, when they had almost arrived in the very harbour of ultimate happiness, why, I say, should such men triumph in and insult the misfortunes of others, having no respect for justice, the ruler of human life, who sits by the side of the great Ruler of the universe, who surveys all things with sleepless and most piercing eyes, and sees what is in recesses as clearly as if it was in the pure sunlight?
16. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.53 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.53. on which account those men who have had unbounded prosperity bestowed upon them, and all things tending to the production of health of body, and riches, and glory, and all other external parts of good fortune, but who have rejected virtue, and have chosen crafty wickedness, and all others kinds of vice, not through compulsion, but of their own spontaneous free will, looking upon that which is the greatest of all evils as the greatest possible advantage, he looks upon as enemies not of mankind only, but of the entire heaven and world, and says that they are awaiting, not any ordinary punishments, but new and extraordinary ones, which that constant assessor of God, justice, who detests wickedness, invents and inflicts terribly upon them, turning against them the most powerful elements of the universe, water and fire, so that at appointed times some are destroyed by deluges, others are burnt with fire, and perish in that manner.
17. Strabo, Geography, 14.5.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14.5.16. After the Cydnus River one comes to the Pyramus River, which flows from Cataonia, a river which I have mentioned before. According to Artemidorus, the distance thence to Soli in a straight voyage is five hundred stadia. Near by, also, is Mallos, situated on a height, founded by Amphilochus and Mopsus, the latter the son of Apollo and Manto, concerning whom many myths are told. And indeed I, too, have mentioned them in my account of Calchas and of the quarrel between Calchas and Mopsus about their powers of divination. For some writers transfer this quarrel, Sophocles, for example, to Cilicia, which he, following the custom of tragic poets, calls Pamphylia, just as he calls Lycia Caria and Troy and Lydia Phrygia. And Sophocles, among others, tells us that Calchas died there. But, according to the myth, the contest concerned, not only the power of divination, but also the sovereignty; for they say that Mopsus and Amphilochus went from Troy and founded Mallos, and that Amphilochus then went away to Argos, and, being dissatisfied with affairs there, returned to Mallos, but that, being excluded from a share in the government there, he fought a duel with Mopsus, and that both fell in the duel and were buried in places that were not in sight of one another. And today their tombs are to be seen in the neighborhood of Magarsa near the Pyramus River. This was the birthplace of Crates the grammarian, of whom Panaetius is said to have been a pupil.
18. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.6.2, 3.6.7, 3.7.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.6.2. Ἀμφιάραος δὲ ὁ Ὀικλέους, 1 -- μάντις ὢν καὶ προειδὼς ὅτι δεῖ πάντας τοὺς στρατευσαμένους χωρὶς Ἀδράστου τελευτῆσαι, αὐτός τε ὤκνει στρατεύεσθαι καὶ τοὺς λοιποὺς ἀπέτρεπε. Πολυνείκης δὲ ἀφικόμενος πρὸς Ἶφιν τὸν Ἀλέκτορος ἠξίου μαθεῖν πῶς ἂν Ἀμφιάραος ἀναγκασθείη στρατεύεσθαι· ὁ δὲ εἶπεν εἰ λάβοι τὸν ὅρμον Ἐριφύλη. Ἀμφιάραος μὲν οὖν ἀπεῖπεν Ἐριφύλῃ παρὰ Πολυνείκους δῶρα λαμβάνειν, Πολυνείκης δὲ δοὺς αὐτῇ τὸν ὅρμον ἠξίου τὸν Ἀμφιάραον πεῖσαι στρατεύειν. ἦν γὰρ ἐπὶ ταύτῃ· 1 -- γενομένης γὰρ †αὐτῆς 2 --πρὸς Ἄδραστον, διαλυσάμενος ὤμοσε, περὶ ὧν ἂν 3 -- Ἀδράστῳ 4 -- διαφέρηται, διακρίνειν Ἐριφύλῃ 5 -- συγχωρῆσαι. ὅτε οὖν ἐπὶ Θήβας ἔδει στρατεύειν, Ἀδράστου μὲν παρακαλοῦντος Ἀμφιαράου δὲ ἀποτρέποντος, Ἐριφύλη τὸν ὅρμον λαβοῦσα ἔπεισεν αὐτὸν σὺν Ἀδράστῳ 6 -- στρατεύειν. Ἀμφιάραος δὲ ἀνάγκην ἔχων στρατεύεσθαι τοῖς παισὶν ἐντολὰς ἔδωκε τελειωθεῖσι τήν τε μητέρα κτείνειν καὶ ἐπὶ Θήβας στρατεύειν. 3.6.7. ἦν δὲ παρὰ Θηβαίοις μάντις Τειρεσίας Εὐήρους καὶ Χαρικλοῦς νύμφης, ἀπὸ γένους Οὐδαίου τοῦ Σπαρτοῦ, γενόμενος τυφλὸς τὰς ὁράσεις. οὗ περὶ τῆς πηρώσεως καὶ τῆς μαντικῆς λέγονται λόγοι διάφοροι. ἄλλοι μὲν γὰρ αὐτὸν ὑπὸ θεῶν φασι τυφλωθῆναι, ὅτι τοῖς ἀνθρώποις ἃ κρύπτειν ἤθελον ἐμήνυε, Φερεκύδης δὲ ὑπὸ Ἀθηνᾶς αὐτὸν τυφλωθῆναι· οὖσαν γὰρ τὴν Χαρικλὼ προσφιλῆ τῇ Ἀθηνᾶ 1 -- γυμνὴν ἐπὶ πάντα ἰδεῖν, τὴν δὲ ταῖς χερσὶ τοὺς ὀφθαλμοὺς αὐτοῦ καταλαβομένην 2 -- πηρὸν ποιῆσαι, Χαρικλοῦς δὲ δεομένης ἀποκαταστῆσαι πάλιν τὰς ὁράσεις, μὴ δυναμένην τοῦτο ποιῆσαι, τὰς ἀκοὰς διακαθάρασαν πᾶσαν ὀρνίθων φωνὴν ποιῆσαι συνεῖναι, καὶ σκῆπτρον αὐτῷ δωρήσασθαι κράνειον, 3 -- ὃ φέρων ὁμοίως τοῖς βλέπουσιν ἐβάδιζεν. Ἡσίοδος δέ φησιν ὅτι θεασάμενος περὶ Κυλλήνην ὄφεις συνουσιάζοντας καὶ τούτους τρώσας ἐγένετο ἐξ ἀνδρὸς 1 -- γυνή, πάλιν δὲ τοὺς αὐτοὺς ὄφεις παρατηρήσας συνουσιάζοντας ἐγένετο ἀνήρ. διόπερ Ἥρα καὶ Ζεὺς ἀμφισβητοῦντες πότερον τὰς γυναῖκας ἢ τοὺς ἄνδρας ἥδεσθαι μᾶλλον ἐν ταῖς συνουσίαις συμβαίνοι, τοῦτον ἀνέκριναν. ὁ δὲ ἔφη δέκα μοιρῶν περὶ τὰς συνουσίας οὐσῶν τὴν μὲν μίαν ἄνδρας ἥδεσθαι, τὰς δὲ ἐννέα 1 -- γυναῖκας. ὅθεν Ἥρα μὲν αὐτὸν ἐτύφλωσε, Ζεὺς δὲ τὴν μαντικὴν αὐτῷ ἔδωκεν. τὸ ὑπὸ Τειρεσίου λεχθὲν πρὸς Δία καὶ Ἥραν· οἴην μὲν μοῖραν δέκα μοιρῶν τέρπεται ἀνήρ, τὰς δὲ δέκʼ ἐμπίπλησι γυνὴ τέρπουσα νόημα. 2 -- ἐγένετο δὲ καὶ πολυχρόνιος. οὗτος οὗν Θηβαίοις μαντευομένοις 3 -- εἶπε νικήσειν, ἐὰν Μενοικεὺς ὁ Κρέοντος Ἄρει σφάγιον αὑτὸν ἐπιδῷ. τοῦτο ἀκούσας Μενοικεὺς ὁ Κρέοντος ἑαυτὸν πρὸ τῶν πυλῶν ἔσφαξε. μάχης δὲ γενομένης οἱ Καδμεῖοι μέχρι τῶν τειχῶν συνεδιώχθησαν, καὶ Καπανεὺς ἁρπάσας κλίμακα ἐπὶ τὰ τείχη διʼ αὐτῆς ἀνῄει, καὶ Ζεὺς αὐτὸν κεραυνοῖ. 3.7.7. δηλώσαντες δὲ τῇ μητρὶ ταῦτα, τόν τε ὅρμον καὶ τὸν πέπλον ἐλθόντες εἰς Δελφοὺς ἀνέθεντο κατὰ πρόσταξιν Ἀχελῴου. πορευθέντες δὲ εἰς τὴν Ἤπειρον συναθροίζουσιν οἰκήτορας καὶ κτίζουσιν Ἀκαρνανίαν. Εὐριπίδης δέ φησιν Ἀλκμαίωνα κατὰ τὸν τῆς μανίας χρόνον ἐκ Μαντοῦς Τειρεσίου παῖδας δύο γεννῆσαι, Ἀμφίλοχον καὶ θυγατέρα Τισιφόνην, κομίσαντα δὲ εἰς Κόρινθον τὰ βρέφη δοῦναι τρέφειν Κορινθίων βασιλεῖ Κρέοντι, καὶ τὴν μὲν Τισιφόνην διενεγκοῦσαν εὐμορφίᾳ ὑπὸ τῆς Κρέοντος γυναικὸς ἀπεμποληθῆναι, δεδοικυίας μὴ Κρέων αὐτὴν γαμετὴν ποιήσηται. τὸν δὲ Ἀλκμαίωνα ἀγοράσαντα ταύτην ἔχειν οὐκ εἰδότα τὴν ἑαυτοῦ θυγατέρα θεράπαιναν, παραγενόμενον δὲ εἰς Κόρινθον ἐπὶ τὴν τῶν τέκνων ἀπαίτησιν καὶ τὸν υἱὸν κομίσασθαι. καὶ Ἀμφίλοχος κατὰ χρησμοὺς Ἀπόλλωνος Ἀμφιλοχικὸν Ἄργος ᾤκισεν. 1 --
19. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 2.3.3 (1st cent. CE

2.3.3. καί ποτε ἀροῦντος αὐτοῦ ἐπιστῆναι ἐπὶ τὸν ζυγὸν ἀετὸν καὶ ἐπιμεῖναι ἔστε ἐπὶ βουλυτὸν καθήμενον· τὸν δὲ ἐκπλαγέντα τῇ ὄψει ἰέναι κοινώσοντα ὑπὲρ τοῦ θείου παρὰ τοὺς Τελμισσέας τοὺς μάντεις· εἶναι γὰρ τοὺς Τελμισσέας σοφοὺς τὰ θεῖα ἐξηγεῖσθαι καὶ σφισιν ἀπὸ γένους δεδόσθαι αὐτοῖς καὶ γυναιξὶν καὶ παισὶ τὴν μαντείαν.
20. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.9.2, 3.11.5-3.11.10, 10.9.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.9.2. Now the Corinthians were most eager to take part in the expedition to Asia, but considering it a bad omen that their temple of Zeus surnamed Olympian had been suddenly burnt down, they reluctantly remained behind. The Athenians excused themselves on the ground that their city was returning to its former state of prosperity after the Peloponnesian war and the epidemic of plague, and the news brought by messengers, that Conon, son of Timotheus, had gone up to the Persian king, strongly confirmed them in their policy of inactivity. 3.11.5. At the altar of Augustus they show a bronze statue of Agias. This Agias, they say, by divining for Lysander captured the Athenian fleet at Aegospotami with the exception of ten ships of war. 405 B.C. These made their escape to Cyprus ; all the rest the Lacedaemonians captured along with their crews. Agias was a son of Agelochus, a son of Tisamenus. 3.11.6. Tisamenus belonged to the family of the Iamidae at Elis, and an oracle was given to him that he should win five most famous contests. So he trained for the pentathlon at Olympia, but came away defeated. And yet he was first in two events, beating Hieronymus of Andros in running and in jumping. But when he lost the wrestling bout to this competitor, and so missed the prize, he understood what the oracle meant, that the god granted him to win five contests in war by his divinations. 3.11.7. The Lacedaemonians, hearing of the oracle the Pythian priestess had given to Tisamenus, persuaded him to migrate from Elis and to be state-diviner at Sparta . And Tisamenus won them five contests in war. 479 B.C. The first was at Plataea against the Persians; the second was at Tegea, when the Lacedaemonians had engaged the Tegeans and Argives; the third was at Dipaea, an Arcadian town in Maenalia, when all the Arcadians except the Mantineans were arrayed against them. 3.11.8. His fourth contest was against the Helots who had rebelled and left the Isthmus for Ithome . 464 B.C. Not all the Helots revolted, only the Messenian element, which separated itself off from the old Helots. These events I shall relate presently. On the occasion I mention the Lacedaemonians allowed the rebels to depart under a truce, in accordance with the advice of Tisamenus and of the oracle at Delphi . The last time Tisamenus divined for them was at Tanagra, an engagement taking place with the Argives and Athenians. 457 B.C. 3.11.9. Such I learned was the history of Tisamenus. On their market-place the Spartans have images of Apollo Pythaeus, of Artemis and of Leto. The whole of this region is called Choros (Dancing), because at the Gymnopaediae, a festival which the Lacedaemonians take more seriously than any other, the lads perform dances in honor of Apollo. Not far from them is a sanctuary of Earth and of Zeus of the Market-place, another of Athena of the Market-place and of Poseidon surnamed Securer, and likewise one of Apollo and of Hera. 3.11.10. There is also dedicated a colossal statue of the Spartan People. The Lacedaemonians have also a sanctuary of the Fates, by which is the grave of Orestes, son of Agamemnon. For when the bones of Orestes were brought from Tegea in accordance with an oracle they were buried here. Beside the grave of Orestes is a statue of Polydorus, son of Alcamenes, a king who rose to such honor that the magistrates seal with his likeness everything that requires sealing. 10.9.7. Opposite these are offerings of the Lacedaemonians from spoils of the Athenians: the Dioscuri, Zeus, Apollo, Artemis, and beside these Poseidon, Lysander, son of Aristocritus, represented as being crowned by Poseidon, Agias, soothsayer to Lysander on the occasion of his victory, and Hermon, who steered his flag-ship.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegina Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
aetiology Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
agias Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
alexandrian aesthetics Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 553
allegory, kairos statue Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
amphiaraus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174; Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
amphilochus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
apollo, as father of manteis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110, 112
apollo Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
apollo (god), sanctuary at syracuse Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
aristotle Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
asclepius Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
athena Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
athena (goddess), sanctuary at syracuse Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
attention, forms of, interpreting vs. baffled Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
bacchylides Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
battus, founder of cyrene Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
bees and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 112
blindness and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 112
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174, 192, 193
contests, athletic Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
conversion, greek ecphrasis Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
corinth Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
cult, transfer Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
cyrene Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
delphi Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174, 192, 193
dinah Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
dinsmoor, william b. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174, 192, 193
divination, and colonization Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 193
divination, and patronage Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174, 192, 193
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
dunbabin, t. j. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
ecphrasis, in epigram Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
ecphrasis Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
enargeia Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 413
epigrams, christian Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
epinician poetry Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
gnomology Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
gods and goddesses, olympian' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
gorgo Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 553
gutzwiller, kathryn Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
healing magic Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
helen Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
heracles Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
herodotus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
heroic ideal Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
iamus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
judaism Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
kairos statue, ecphrases of Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
lyric Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
magna graecia (south italy and sicily), religious tradition and innovation Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
magna graecia (south italy and sicily), temples and sanctuaries Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
magna graecia (south italy and sicily) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
malkin, i. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 193
mania, and social class/status Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174
mania, family genealogies of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174, 192, 193
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174, 192, 193
mantis, becoming a mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110, 112
mantis, guild/family membership of manteis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110, 112
manto Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
marriage Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
medicine Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
melampus, anscestors of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174
melampus, melampids Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
menelaus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
mopsus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
odysseus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
oenomaus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
olympia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
olympics Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
panhellenism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
paredros Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
pelops Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
pericles Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 193
pfaff, c. a. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573
philo Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
phineas Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 112
pindar Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174, 192, 193; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 413, 553
political geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
polyidus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
polyphemus Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 553
prauscello, lucia Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
prioux, e. Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
renunciation Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
rhodes Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
ritual Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
sicily Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
solomon Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
sophocles Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 192
sparta Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
statues Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
teiresias Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 192
tellias, telliadae Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
temporality, in epigram Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 28
theoclymenus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
thestor Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
tiresias Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110, 112
tisamenos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
tisamenus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 110
tlepolemus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25
virginity Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
wilamowitz, u. v. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174
zeus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 25; Pevarello, The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism (2013) 71
zeus (god), sanctuary at syracuse Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 573